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Full text of "Antioch News 09/30/1994"

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ANB757 12/28/94 ** c ~ 7 

ANTIOCH TOWNSHIP LIBRARY 

757 MAIN STREET 

Anticcr, IL «2 



VOL. 1 08 NO. 59 



ANTIOCH SEPTEMBER 50, 1 




NT, ^m&^ ARY DlSTR,CT 

757ft, Main Street 
Antioch, I L 60002 '••, 



C1994-A Sdiro odor Publication 



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MARY FOLEY 



Staff Reporter 

Approximately 42,000 marked 
largcmouth bass were released 
into the Chain O' Lakes last 
weekend. The fish release was a 
result of the collaborative efforts 
of the. Illinois Department of 
Conservation, specifically the 
officers at the Spring Grove Fish 
Hatchery, and area fishing 



enthusiasts including the 
Northland Bass Group. 

"Largcmouth bass Is probably 
one of the most sought after of 
the game fish in the Chain," said 
Greg Dickson, owner of Triangle 
Sports and Marine in Antioch. 
Dickson was just one of the many 
volunteers who helped with the 
release, * 

The bass were raised from the 



fingcrling stage at the rearing 
ponds in Spring Grove. "We- 
raised them here in the ponds," 
said Dick Corey, the hatchery 
manager. After 11 to 12 weeks/ 
the fish reached the size of 
roughly 5 inches. The legal 
minimum for taking the fish 
from the Chain is 14 inches. . 

"There were so many 
volunteers, "said Corey. M Wc 



groups 



worked with local- 
marking the fish." 

"They drew the water down 
and the approximately 1,400 
pounds of fish were taken 
indoors," said. Dickson. .'.He 
estimates it took eight volunteers 
to freeze brand the fish, using a 
tool with liquid nitrogen, to mark 
the fish. "The brands should stay 
See FISH page AiO 




The great pumpkin 

With fail in the air, pumpkins are being harvested and carved 
Into Jack-c-Iantems throughout the county. Alfred Kohler. left, 
and his son-in-law Jim Noga load a hybrid pumpkin onto a 



tractor at Kohler's Nursery in Volp. Kohler weighed In his 
heaviest pumpkin at 240 pounds.— Photo by Todd F. Hobtor 




Pumpkins for sale 

Antioch 's Boy Scouts of America Troop 92 Is selling pumpkins 
on Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at 
Antioch Auto Parts on Route 173. Just east of Route .83. 



Three cars crash, two 
injured on North Ave. 



MARY FOLEY 



Staff Reporter 

Two people were injured as a 
result of an early evening 
collision on North Avenue 
Monday night. The accident 
occurred when a 1986 Plymouth, 
driven by 16-year-old James 
Cogley of Gurnce, swerved into 
an oncoming car driven by Louis 
Rosen of Skokie. 

According to Lieutenant 
Charles Watkins of the Antioch 
Police Department, Cogley was 
traveling westbound on North 
Avenue, while the Rosen vehicle 
was traveling castbound. 
"Witnesses said the Cogley 
vehicle just veered out to the 
left," he said. 

Coglcy's car struck Rosen's 
1987 Buick Skylark head-on. A 
third car, a 1987 Dodge Omni 
driven by Michael Madson of Las 
Vegas, was also headed 



eastbound and ran into Rosen's 
car. "It was unavoidable," said 
Watkins. 

. Cogley was pinned in the 
vehicle. Antioch Rescue Squad 
Was able to remove Cogley from 
the car and the Flight for Life 

\lh\s year we have 
had more fatalities 
than I, can ever 
rem ember' 

-Lt, Charles Watkins 

helicopter was called. 
Unfortunately, the weather was 
too inclement for the helicopter 
to land and instead, Cogley was 
transported to St. Thcrcsc 
Hospital. 

Rosen was also injured in the 
crash and taken to St. Thcrcsc. 
Sec CRASH page AIO • 



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SfpTCMbfR 10, 1994 LAkeUNc! Newspapers COMMUNITY 



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Martini, Farrell vie 
for County Board seat 



MARY FOLEY 



Slithery friend 

Cub Scouts from Pack 80 check out a tang snake at a seminar with Dr. Mike Com, associate pro- 
fessor of biology at.the College of Lake County. This was the first In a series of monthly seminars and ; 
workshops hosted by the Northern lllnote Conservation Club.— Photo by Andrew Konrath 







MARY FOLEY 



Staff Reporter 

A representative from the Lake 
County Sheriffs Department, 
Officer Marty Smith, spoke to sub- 
division representatives of United 
Homeowners Associations of 
Unincorporated Antioch (UHAUA) 
last week about subdivision safety. 
Hie thrust of Smith's message was 
that neighbor responsibility is the 
key to subdivision safety. 

"We need the community's 
cooperation to act as the eyes and 
ears of the police," Smith said. 
"This is one of the responsibilities 
of citizenship." 

Smith told the group the rea- 
son the Sheriffs Department can- 
not drive through subdivisions 
looking for crime is because of the 
small number of officers and cars 
assigned to the Antioch area. 
Since only two cars are assigned, 
per shift, Sheriffs Deputies can 
only react to crimes already com- 
mitted instead of cruising neigh- 
borhoods to deter crime. 

"You expect the police to pro- 



tect you, but we can't," Smith 
explained. "When I go to work, 
who protects my house? Who pro- 
tects your house? Not the police." 

Smith estimated that approxi- 
mately 250,000 people come 
through Antioch during a summer 
weekend. But, he pointed out that 
it is more likely visitors are victims 
of crimes, not residents. 

"The population in the 
Antioch District is one-quarter of 
a million on summer weekends," 
said Smith. "The victims most 
often are the visitors. They come 
up here and their guard is down." 

The good news, according to 
Smith, is that ■ neighborhood 
watch programs do work. "The 
program is so successful if done 
correctly,'* he stated. "But, the 
programs must be maintained. " 

Smith offered to present the 
Neighborhood Watch Program to 
any subdivision in which 50 per- 
cent of the homes show an inter- 
est in becoming involved. Smith 
told the group the program lasts 
approximately 2-3 hours and he 



will teach homeowners how to 
correctly call the police, how to 
properly report a crime or suspi- 
cious circumstance, and how to 
follow through with the call. 

"We will teach you ho w to get 
service from the police," Smith 
told the group. , "What we are 
looking for, number one, is gain- 
ing the cooperation of our com- 
munities. We'll teach you to call 
the police." 

During the presentation, 
Smith distributed forms for sub- 
division representatives to bring 
back to their membership, to 
help residents record informa- 
tion. He also distributed a home 
security check-off list to deter- 
mine if security precautions are 
being followed. 

Smith also told the group how 
to get a program off the ground in 
a subdivision. He suggested 
holding an informal meeting to 
determine homeowner interest. 
"If you can't get 50 percent, get 
those that are interested to get 
others, " he suggested. . 



Lakeland <■£«*■ 

NewHpopem 027-080) 

Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 1886 

Otiiee of Publication: 30 South Whitney St, 

G ray »!aka, I L 60030. Phone {708)223-01 61 . 

Published weekly, second class pottage paid at 
Oraytlaka, IL 60030. 

Mail Subscription Rain: £19.50 Par Year by Mail 
pakl in advance in Lake, Cook, Kenosha and 
McHanfy Countm; elsewhere $27.00 Per Year 
by Mai paid In advance. 

Postmaster Send address changes to Antioch 
News-Reporter, 30 South Whitney Street, P.O. 
Box 263, Qrayslake, llinois 6003a 

(708)223-8161 



New park to be given a name 



Artwh News-Reporter 
Lake Zurich Enfeipfisa 
Lab Vila Record 
MunoWn News 
Grayslaka Tints 
Fox Lake Press 



GumM Press 

Round Lake News 

Wanconda Leader 

LfceityvSle News 

Lindenhurct News 

Warren-Newport Press 



' Vemon Hife News 

M.R. SCHROE0ER 

Founder-1904-1086 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

PuWbhor/Praskteni 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

General Manager 

SHARON ZASADIL 

Operations Manager 

JUL DePASGUALE BOB SCHROEDER 

0asa ;A> siat | lHr. " ' Csaeawisfr. 

J0DAVB ANN H.ROBERTS 

tot****/. anWW^isk;. 

RHONDA HETRKK BURKE 

EdMtOmt " 



MARY FOIEY __ 

Staff Reporter 

The park board has submitted 
a list of suggested -names to the 
Antioch Village Board for the new 
park located on Route 173. The 
park, which has been opened for 
most of the summer, has been 
without an official name. 

"It has no name yet," explained 
the new Parks Director Cheryl 
McCameron. "However, we have 
submitted a proposed list of 
names to the Village Board. They 
are the ones who will decide. " 

The new park is located off 
Route 173 across from the jewel 
food store. It has already had the 
parking lot black topped and the 
potential uses are currently being 
discussed by the park board. 

Initially, the park was to be used 
for soccer fields, but the park has 
wonderful open spaces and access 
to a channel. The board Is consid- 
ering placing a pavilion in the park, 
non-permanent restrooms, and 
even allowing fishing. 

However, after the park board 
met last week and discussed the 
matter, more nature oriented 
uses are being considered. 
Instead of soccer, McCameron 



hopes the park will be. used for 
scouting programs, wildlife pro- 
grams, and fishing derbies. 

"It is really pretty back there," 
said McCameron. "We hope to take 
advantage of its natural setting." 

While the channel in the park 
does not open up onto the Chain 
O' Lakes, it can offer Antioch resi- 
dents and visitors a place to spend 
an afternoon fishing. Also, the 
setting, provides an extremely 
attractive place to hold a picnic 
The park would also provide a 
wonderful place for students to. 
learn about the wetlands that sur- 
round Antioch. 

The park is open every day 
from dawn until dusk, but at this 
time, the portable restrooms have 
not been installed. McCameron 
said, "We expect to have rcstroom 
facilities in the spring." 

It is also not known if a pavil- 
ion can even be installed in the 
park. According to McCameron, 
"The pavilion is up for discus- 
sion." One of the problems is that 
the park is located on the wet- 
lands and. it does not require 
much digging to hit water. 
McCameron said that a floating 
pavilion is being considered. 



Staff Reporter 

The race for Jim Fields' Dlst. 1 
County Board spot Is nearing as 
Republican contender Judy 
Martini squares off with 
Democratic candidate Grant 
Farrcll. Interestingly enough, 
both candidates have pledged 
not to use campaign signs. 

With the agreement: not to use 
campaign signs, the only evi- 
dence of campaigning in Dist 1 
may well be door-to-door can- 
vassing, phone calls, and mailers. 
And, maybe not even that. Both 
candidates say they want low key, 
more orderly campaigns than last 
April's primary. 

Farrell is a life-long resident of 
Lake County. He was raised in 
Waukegan and' attended 
Roosevelt University, Farrell 
resides in Antioch with his wife, 
Debra, and their sons, Andrew 
and Bret Farrell owns his own 
business consulting firm. 

A member of the 
Experimental Aircraft 

Association, Farrell is also serving 
His third term as an elected offi- 
cial on the executive Health and 
Welfare Board of the Plumbers 
Local 93. In addition, he has 
completed his second term as 
president of the Illinois branch of 
the Orton Dyslexia Society and is 
now chairperson for the national 
board. Many Antioch residents 
know Farrell from his work with 
the Antioch Swim Team Board. 

Martini. Is also a well known' 
Antiochian. . She is a director on 
the Waterway- Management 
Agency, a member of Citizens 
Against • Unsafe Electricity 
(CAUSE), and a former member 
of the Special Area Management 
Planning Commission (SAMP) 
which was abolished when the 
Environmental Impact Study was 
completed earlier this year. 

Age 42, Martini has lived in 
Antioch for 18 years, graduating 
from Richmond-Burton High 
School. She studied environ- 
mental horticulture at the College 
of Lake County and is a licensed 
personal assistant and Realtor at 
RE/MAX Advantage in Antioch, 

Martini lives with her son, 
Jesse, and is a member of St. Peter 
Church in Antioch. In April, she 
won the Republican spot on the 
ballot from Incumbent/ Antioch 




Judy Martini 







Grant Farted 

Township Supervisor Jim Fields. 
- Both Farrejl and Martini have 
similar ideologies. Both want 
"impact fee's to be increased, 
increased local representation at 
the County level, and both claim 
to have that sometimes unheard 
of political quality, common 
sense. 

When asked, each candidate 
admitted a similarity in ideology. 

"We're going to be fairly close 
on the issues," said Farrell. - 

"We're probably going to 
agree," said Martini. 

Farrcll believes the differ- 
ences may be in their approach 
and backgrounds. "I have. busi- 
ness skills which were developed 
through my consulting business, " 
explained Farrcll. He suggested 
Martini's background -in real 
estate would provide a different 
approach. 



Br.eFs 



CAUSE to sell books 

Citizens Against Unsafe Electricity (CAUSE), a group 
opposed to the installation of overhead electrical lines, is sell- 
ing Entertainment '95 discount savings books. Entertainment 
'95 is one of Chicagoland's leading discount dining and leisure 
discount books. The price of the books arc $35 each and can 
be obtained by calling any member of CAUSE or call 395-1872. 
The organization would also like to thank everyone for their 
•help during the summer rummage sales. 

Fetters holds elections 

The Felters Homeowner Association has elected new offi- 
cials for the '94-'95 fiscal year. Carole Jonites will be the new 
president and Mary Jones will be the acting vice president 
Forest Anderson is the new treasurer and Pam Dec is secretary. 
Aldermen for the year will be Fran Tomasik, Donna Raymo, 
Gene McMcel, and Chuck Pall. 

Millburn Ladies Aid to meet 

Roast beef cafeteria dinner will be served by the Millbum 
Ladies Aid Society Thursday, Oct 6 at noon at the Millbum 
Congregational United Church of Christ, Rtc. 45 and Grass 
Lake Road, Millbum. Admission is $6 for adults; $3 for children 
ages five and older; free for those under five. Tickets may be 
purchased at the door. For further information, call 356-8160. 



SHM 



COMMUNITY LaIceUnc! Newspapers. StpTtMbcn 10, .1 994 



Ell 

Unit support asks to meet with boards 



ALEC JUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

Lake Villa unit district sup- 
porters arc organizing meetings 
with school districts to facilitate 
discussion on determining the 
legal and financial Impact of the 
district. 

Members of the Committee of 
10, arc asking for public forums 
with two representatives and a 
superintendent of all the boards 
effected within the proposed unit 
district boundaries. The aim is to 
provide solutions with other school 
districts and provide the public 
with information concerning the 
real costs of the unit district 

. Former Lake County Regional 
Superintendent Bill Thompson 
has agreed to act as a mediator at 
these meetings. 

Joanne Osmond, president of 



the Committee of 10, said the 
committee is trying to inform the 
public but is having a difficult 
time finding correct and current 
information. 

"We are having a problem 
determining what the numbers 
arc. Each time the numbers can 
be different depending on what Is 
more favorable to them. Some 
districts seem to be spending 
more time trying to protect them- 
selves than work with us," 
Osmond said. 

Osmond said so far Lake Villa 
Elementary District, Grayslakc 
High School District and Grant 
High School District have been 
very cooperative in providing 
accurate numbers which haven't 
changed. 

The unit district is a proposal 
to have a K-12 district covering 



most of Lake Villa Township 
Including Lake Villa Elementary 
District, portions of Antioch, 
Grayslakc, Grant High School 
Districts, Antioch District 34 and 
Millburn Elementary District- 

Voters in April will be asked if. 
they want to pay $39 million for a 
high school in the affected dis- 
trict, whether they want the dis- 
trict and elect a school board. 

Among the issues to be. dis- 
cussed will be the division of 
assets. The division Is required as 
payment from the old districts to 
the unit district for the portion 
determined as the unit's value of 
the current districts. 

Osmond believes the num- 
bers don't have to be arbitrary 
figures but mutually agreed num- 
bers which can benefit all dis- 
tricts. 



Dist. 41 to attend forum on unit district 



ALEC JUNGE 



Staff Reporter 

Lake Villa District 41 
Elementary school board mem- 
bers will attend an informal 
meeting set up for the Lake Villa 
unit district Committee of 10. 

The meeting is scheduled for 
Oct 19 and former Lake County 
Superintendent of Schools Bill 
Thompson is holding it as an 
intermediary. District 41 will 
send two members to the meet- 
ing. Unit district representatives 
want to meet with school boards 
to begin discussions on financial 
issues which will impact the 
school district 

"We will have two representa- 
tives. We haven't decided what 
two. We have to look at our calen- 
dars," said Dr. Alan Simon, 
District 41 superintendent 



A Lake Villa unit district, pro- 
posed in the April ballot, would 
encompass all of the current 
District 41 territory. The district 
would also cover portions of the 
Antioch District 34 Elementary 
District, Grant High School District, 
Antioch District 117 High School 
District and Millburn District 24. 

The unit district would be a K- 
12 school district covering most of 
Lake Villa Township. Voters will 
decide if they want to finance a $39 
million building bond for a high 
school and an elementary school. 

Also on the ballot is the issue 
of deciding if voters would want a 
unit district and to vote on school 
board candidates. 

Millburn and Antioch 34 are 
appealing the decision made by 
Joseph Spagnolo, state superinten- 
dent of schools, which allowed the 



issue to appear on the ballot 

District 41 has remained neu- 
tral of the unit plan. Simon said 
the district will send only two 
board members to avoid having 
to go through the process of call- 
ing a special meeting. 

Dr. Jim Biockingcr, District 24 
superintendent,, said the Mill- 
burn board will have a committee 
meeting on Oct. 3 before making 
a decision on attending. 

Joanne Osmond, president of 
the Committee of 10, has called 
for meetings with school boards 
to determine the actual costs of a 
Unit District and costs to the 
other affected districts. 

Simon said he expects the 
meeting to be informal In nature. 
At this point it's not known if the 
meeting will be a public or a pri- 
vate meeting. 



School BrIeFs— — 

Calligraphy classes 

Calligraphy classes, at both the beginning and intermediate 
skill levels, arc being offered at the Antioch Upper Grade • 
School. The class will meet for eight weeks and the fee is $50. It 
is open to all ages and anyone interested should call the school 
at 395- 1905. 

Up the creek 

The seventh-grade science classes at Antioch Upper Grade. 
School will be Investigating the water of Antioch and Scquplt 
Creek. Students will be modeling rivers in a stream table, water 
testing of lakes and streams, and water supplies. At the end of 
October, students will spend a week at Scquoif Creek measuring 
the creek profile, the speed of the water, testing the soil around 
the creek and the quality of water. ' 

Sixth day enrollments 

The sixth day enrollment figures arc In from the elementary 
districts in Antioch. For District 34 (Antioch Lower Grade, , 
Antioch Upper Grade, Oakland, and Petty) a slight increase was 
reported from last year's sixth day figures. The district has 1,877 
students at this point, up from the 1,067 of last year. Oakland 
School reports an increase of 23 students. Emmons School 
District reports an enrollment of 297 students. At the end of last 
year, Emmons had 274 students attending. Grass Lake District 
reports a slight drop in enrollment from the end of last year. 
Grass Lake's sixth day figure is 277, down from the 283 students 
reported at the end of the year. 

Peddlers Alley 

The Antioch Community High School Student Assistance 
Program (SAP) presents the Third Annual Peddler's Alley Craft 
Show on Saturday, Oct. 8 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. With over 40 
craftcrs on hand, there should be something for everyone. 
Food will be served along with a bake sale and raffle to benefit 
various programs within the SAP. 



Write Us 



Lakeland Newspapers wants to 
hear : news of local sporting 
events, clubs, organizations, etc. 
Black and white photos are also 
welcome. Please send news items 
to Claudia M. Lenart 30 S. 
Whitney, Grayslake, 60030. or call 
223-8161. 




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ScpTtMbER JO, 1994 UkclANd Newspapers COMMUNITY 





Beat 



Persons charged with a crime are Innocent until proven 
guilty In a court of law. 

ANTIOCH 

licenses revoked 

Peter J. Gargano, age 30, of Antioch, was also charged with 
driving on a revoked drivers license on Sept. 25. He was addi- 
tionally charged with no taillights, and operation of an unin- 
sured vehicle. He was released on bond but arrested again on 
Sept, 26 for once again driving on a revoked license and opera- 

. tion of an uninsured vehicle. He was again released on $2,000 
bond. 

Keith L Gant, age 35, of Trevor, Wis., was charged with dri- 
ving on a revoked Wisconsin and Illinois drivers license on Sept. 
24. He was stopped when officers observed his registration 
sticker had expired. Police observed several cans of beer on the 

; front passenger floor area, but Gant was able to perform various 
field sobriety tests successfully. Gant was charged with operat- 
ing on a foreign license while revoked, operation of a vehicle, 
with an expired registration, illegal transportation of alcohol, 
and driving while revoked. He was released on bond. 

Omit A. Knapowski Jr., age 25, of Park City, was charged with . 
driving on a revoked license on Sept. 25. He was also charged 
with no registration light, and operation of an uninsured motor 
vehicle. He was released on bond. 

Consumption by minor 

After a routine traffic stop, police arrested Monila A. Roed, ' 
age 17, of Antioch on Sept. 23, after the arresting officer detect- 
ed an odor of alcohol on his breath and two open bottles of beer 
- on the drivers side floor. Roed was charged with disobeying a 
traffic device, transportation of open alcohol, and consumption 
of alcohol by a minor. ' 

Car attack 

Richard W. Turner, age 19, of Antioch was charged with dis- 
orderly conduct after an altercation in the parking lot of the 
Squire Restaurant According to the report, a group of • 
unknown juveniles allegedly led by Turner began yelling pro- 
fanities and kicking a car on Sept. 23. He was released on bond. 



Damage to truck 



On Sept. 20, person(s) unknown threw two lit cigarettes on 
the bed cover of a pick-up truck parked at Ben Franklin. 
Estimated damage to be $250. 



broken at school 

A 36-inch by 20-inch window on the second floor of Antioch 
Community High School was broken on Sept. 19. An employee 
who was working in the school saw a white male wearing a red 
shirt and jeans running from the area The damage is estimated 
to be approximately $60 and police are investigating. 



Police thwart suicide 
attempt at jail cell 



MARYFOliY 

Staff Reporter 

As a result of quick action by 
the Antioch Police Department, 
Thomas E. Patton, age 24, of 

. Antioch, is still alive today. Patton 
was despondent after he was 
arrested when police responded to 
a domestic dispute on Sept 9 and 
discovered an outstanding war- 
rant for deceptive practices. 

According to police reports, 
Patton became involved in a ver- 
bal argument that turned physi- 
cal. Police brought Patton to the 
police station where he became 
combative, threatening, and 
refused to cooperate with book- 
ing procedures. He was placed 
into a cell for "safety reasons." 
Patton then began threatcn- 

; ing to "off' himself and police 



summoned the Antioch Rescue 
Squad. Unfortunately, prior to 
the arrival of the emergency 
squad, Patton attempted to hang 
himself with a blanket. 

Police were able to subdue 
Patton with pepper spray and 
gain entry to the cell before he 
harmed himself further. Patton 
was then taken to St. Thcrcse 
Hospital for observation. 

Patton refused to cooperate 
with medical staff and police 
were told that he could be accept- 
ed on a suicide watch with pend- 
ing charges. After refusing med- 
ical treatment, Patton was taken 
to Lake County Jail on a suicide 
watch. 

He was charged with battery 
and criminal damage to property 
by the Antioch Police. 



i, 

Pedestrian killed on Main St. 



fiindclaria Aguirre, age 60, of 
Antioch was killed when she crossed 
Main Street. Aguirre was from 
Mexico and had only been in Antioch 
for one month before the accident 

According to reports, Aguirre 
was walking near Antioch Com- 
munity High School when she 
began to cross Route 83. The driver 
of a car, traveling southbound, 



apparently did not sec her. Antioch 
Police Department officials said no 
ticket was issued to the driver. 

"She just walked out into the 
street," said Lieutenant Charles 
Watkins. Watkins said it occurred 
by Strang Funeral Home. 

Aguirre was taken to Froedtert 
Memorial Hospital, where she died 
Several days after the accident 



Kentucky officials praise local police 



STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter 

Cooperation among Illinois 
and Kentucky law enforcement 
officials is being praised as the 
prosecution of Michael Louis 
Anderson nears. 

Anderson waived his extra- 
dition rights, which is something 
which Owensboro, Ky. police feel 
is a plus in speeding the process. 

" If we had the cooperation we 
had with Lake County elsewhere, 
law enforcement would be able 
to put a lot tighter net around 
criminals. The conduct of the 
Lake County authorities speaks 
well for their agencies," Captn, 
Steve Kimble of Owensboro, Ky. 
police said. 

Law enforcement officials in 
Lake County are working with 
Owensboro; Kyi counterparts on 
the extradition of Michael An- 
derson. Anderson has requested 
the death penalty. He is likely to 
face fugitive from justice and 
strong armed robbery charges. 

Anderson,' age 18, is wanted 



for a July 13 murder committed in 
his Owensboro apartment. 
Anderson confessed to the mur- 
der Sept 16 at Lake County Jail. 

"From what we understand, 
from Owensboro, Ky. police, he 
robbed and strangled an 84-year- 
old lady in his apartment It was a 
hideous crime," Lt Chester Iwan 
of the Lake County Sheriffs 
Department said. 

Anderson has requested the 
death penalty. 

Kimble said the Ownesboro 
police do not state if someone 
has confessed. "We say he made 
statements which lead us to be- 
lieve he was the criminal," Kim- 
ble said. "The details will come 
out In court.'.' 

Anderson will be proscuted 
by Commonwealth of Kentucky 
Atty.TomCastllen. 

Owensboro police came to 
Lake County, Sept. 17. "They 
reinterviewed him and we as- 
sume he cave the same confes- 
sion," Iwan said. 

Kimble said Owensboro po- 



lice were not expecting to bring 
Anderson back to Kentucky that 
trip. 

Iwan said Lake County State's 
Attorney Mike. Waller and his 
- counterpart from the Common- 
wealth of Kentucky are working 
out the details of the death penal- 
ty request 

Anderson Is charged with 
fugitive from justice as well as 
armed robbery. He stole about 
$500 at Stan's gas station Sept; 11; 
$106 at Gurnce Plggly Wiggly 
video section Sept 12 and an 
undisclosed amount of cash at a 
Citgo north of Antioch Sept 13, 

It was after the Wisconsin in- 
cident that led to the chase in- 
volving Lake Villa, Lindenhurst, 
Gurnee and Lake County Sheriffs 
Department Anderson was 
stopped without injury after he 
tried to exit Wendy's restaurant 
parking lot 

Kenosha County Lt Larry 
Zarletti said Anderson displayed 
a weapon, as he had at the Lake 
County thefts. 



Waterfalls, residents to work on noise 



MARY FOLEY 



Staff Reporter 

Approximately 30 residents 
appeared Tuesday night at the 
Antioch Village Liquor Commis- 
sion hearing regarding com- 
plaints against the Waterfalls 
Restaurant The types of viola- 
tions discussed included loud 
noise complaints, battery and 
disorderly conduct .complaints, 
minor drinking complaints, crim- 
inal damage to property, and 
other miscellaneous complaints. 

Despite the various problems, 



according to Mayor Marilyn 
Shineflug, neighbors are most 
concerned with noise. "Most of 
the residents are concerned with 
the loud noise complaints," said 
Shineflug. "Specifically, the bass 
vibrations." 

The village liquor commission 
has the authority to fine] the 
owner, John Karris, or even sus- 
pend or revoke his liquor license. 
"We've fined them before," 
Shineflug said. 

. No decision was made regard- 
ing the complaints at this hearing, 



however, some of the residents 
have agreed to form a committee 
to work with Katris to "establish 
noise limits." Shineflug seemed 
hopeful that the restaurant owner 
and staff will be able to work out 
the problem with neighbors. "It 
was good," she said of their coop- 
erative effort 

According to Shineflug, "The 
least expensive way to reduce the 
noise is turn down the volume." 
The board is waiting to get a tran- 
script of the hearing before mak- 
ing a determination. 



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COMMUNITY' UktlANtl Newspapers StpTCMbcit ?0, 1994 



'/ 



Terry-Ross 

On Aug. 7, Rantll Terry mar- 
ried Jim Ross In a beautiful pool- 
. side, backyard, garden wedding. 
Randi is the daughter of Fran and 
Paul Adcllzzi of Antioch, and this 
very special wedding ceremony " 
and reception was hosted in their 
beautiful Antioch homo. About 
35 close family members and 
friends were on hand for the 
occasion. 

Little Paige Majcwskl, Fran 
and Paul's granddaughter, came 
in from Florida to be Randi and 
Jim's very special little flower girl. 
Rand i's maid of honor was her 
sister, Chcrri Majcwskl, and 
Griffin Ross was the best man. 

Shona and John Gcycr were 
the bridesmaid and groomsman, 
and Nicholc and Ken Adelizzi 
were the junior bridesmaid and 
junior groomsman. 

It was a total family affair, 
even little Paige's daddy, Mark 
Majcwskl, walked her down the 
aisle assisting her with her flower 
girl duties. Randi and Jim arc liv- 
ing in the Antioch area and, natu- 
rally, Momma Fran is very happy 
to have them so close to home. 
Congratulations, everyone, and 
many years of love, happiness 
and health for Randi arid Jim. 

Many awards 

Nineteen members of Health 
Systems Tae Kwon Do Club of 
Antioch qualified to enter the 
Junior Tae Kwon Do Olympics 
held at the Roscmont Horizon. 
They competed with over 4,700 
participants from all over the 
country. When all was said and 
done, seven of the 19 walked 
away winners. 

Congratulations to Wally 
O'Connor (third-place, forms), 
John Sicbert, Jr. (third-place, 
sparring), Dana Glcwicz (third- 
place, sparring), Greg Hiigcnbeig 
(second-place, sparring), 

Michelle Elliott (third-place, 
sparring), Matthew Elliott (first- 
place, sparring) and Mitchell 
Elliott (first-place, forms). 

Easy to please 

Once again I am reminded 
how easy it is to please a child. 
On Labor Day, as I was busy in 
the kitchen, Andrew and Bertha 
began to bark excitedly, and then 



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Don't Forget 




I heard a faint knock at the door. 
It was my sweet little friends, 
nine-year-old Kjcrstcn and eight- 
year-old Ursula Martens. 

They wanted to play on our 
swing set. As they entered my 
home to verbalize their request, 
they greeted me with a hug. I 
gave them permission and told 
them after I completed my 
chores and got dressed I would 
come out to visit I mentioned 
that our cat, Sophie, had kittens 
and when Donna came home 
they could sec them. 

After a short time 1 walked 
outside with my bag of bread. I 
called the girls to me. As we sat 
feeding the "sharks" (Ursula's 
version of Carp Whales), some 
ducks swam over to get their 
share of the goodies. 

The excitement on the girls' 
faces and in their voices as they, 
marveled over the compatibility 
of the fish and ducks reminded 
me how the most simple activi- 
ties makes a child happy. 

When Donna arrived home, 
they almost knocked her down 
with their requests to sec the kit- 
tens.- They cuddled them gently, 
well aware that their presence 
made Momma Sophie a bit ner- 
vous. They were a little disap- 
pointed when they discovered all 
the kittens already had homes. 
Especially Ursula, who put in her 
request should Sophie bless us 
with another titter. . 

They we're human 

If you attended a Catholic 
School in the '50s and '60s, you 
will most likely relate to what I 
am about to write here. To me, 
and many of my friends and fel- 
low classmates, the nuns that 
taught us our reading, writing, 
arithmetic and religion had a 
very mysterious quality about 
them— almost as if they were not 
human. 

For example, we thought they 
were completely bald under 
those enormous headdresses. We 
also thought they slept in their 



habits and absolutely, did not 
take them off for any reason. 
Therefore, they couldn't possibly 
bathe or use the bathroom. 

Also, nuns never got sick and 
they also never laughed or had 
fun with each other— that Is, in 
our opinion. To us, they prayed 
in the morning, came to school to 
teach us; then returned to the 
convent to continue praying 



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until bedtime. 

This misbelief continued until 
we were in the seventh or eighth 
grade, at which time we actually 
mustered up the courage to 
question them about some of 
these myths. When I was a 
sophomore in high school, some- 
thing Happened in my geometry 
class that convinced me and my 
fellow classmates that the holy 
sisters were definitely human. To 
continue . . . 

Couldn't stop 

The name of our geometry 
teacher was Sister Mary Sheila. 
She was very sweet and soft spo- 
ken, and an excellent geometry 
teacher. This one particular day 
the class as a whole was having 
difficulty understanding a partic- 
ular problem. She decided to go 
to the board to demonstrate the 
steps to work it out. 

She picked up the chalk and 
drew a straight line on the board 
and said, "This is aline," as if we 
couldn't figure it out for our- 
selves, having been in her class 
for several months and all of us 
being 15 or 16 years of age. 

- When she realized she verbal- 
ly Identified what all of us already 
knew, she got the giggles and 
absolutely could not stop. We, in 
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garden 

with her. She would then com- 
pose herself and we would do the 
same. 

However, each time she went 
back to the board to demonstrate 
the problem, her giggles would 
return. Finally she said, "Forget 
this problem, let's move on to 
something 0180," However, try as 
she might, she absolutely could 
not teach us for the rest of the peri- 
od, because no matter what she 
said or did her giggles persisted. 

She finally gave up, assigned 
us a few problems for homework 
and promised to be back under 
control the next day— and she 
was. From that day forth, it was, 
business as usual in geometry 
class. In hindsight, we may have 
lost one day of geometry, but we 
gained so much more. 

We all finally realized that the 
holy sisters were definitely 
human, and learned that laughter 
had a way of binding people 
together in a very special way. We 
gained a different degree of 
respect for Sister Mary Sheila, and 
as we would see her in the halls 
over the years we would always 
inquire, "Sister, arc you still draw- 
ing lines on your blackboard?" 
Her warm, all-knowing smile 
would return as she bid us a good 
day and went merrily on her way. 




Special kit 

Mrs. Phillips, a teacher at 
Grass Lake School, sent the fol- 
lowing list of positive usage Ideas 
for school supplies home with; 
each student. I was touched by 
the love, respect and, caring, the 
messages imparted, so I decided 
to share them with all of my read- 
ers. 

Tissue; To remind you to dry 
someone's tears (or perhaps your 
own, so you can see the. tears of 
others). Button: To button your 
lips to keep from saying mean 
things about others or talking 
when it is not • appropriate. 
Toothpick: To pick put the good 
qualities of everyone— including 
yourself. DandAid: To heal the 
hurt feelings, cither, yours or 
someone else's. Candy Kiss: 
Everyone needs a nice treat occa- 
sionally. Gold Thread: Friendship 
is the golden thread that tics 
together the hearts of everyone. 
Eraser Everyone makes mistakes 
and that's all right. Lifcsaver 
Candy: To think of your teacher 
as your lifcsaver. When you need 
to talk, feel free to come see me. 
Mint You are worth a mint to 
me. While these special messages 
were given to the children, I think 
It contains wonderful food for 
thought for adults as well. 



will sponsor 
12th Annual Craft Festival 



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CounW tten * LAKE VILLA, ILLINOIS 



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SfpTCMbcit 70, 1994 La^Ianc! Newspapers COMMUNITY 






Antioch howls this Halloween 



Eye to eye 

Secqnd-grado^ Rachel Romle of Antioch gets a mouse's eye 
view during an open house at Ihe Seventh-day Adventist 
Christian School of Lake County, located In Gumee. The 35-. 
year-old school, which accepts students of all denomina- 
tions, has seen a dramatic enrollment growth In the past few 
years— Photo by N*al Tucker 





iNqs- 

FaH classes starting at park 



Now that we're approaching 
the start of October, many of you 
probably have been out shopping 
for Halloween, making party 
plans, or trying to find just the 
right guy to be the third person 
for the Fruit of the Loom cos- 
tume. If you arc already busy 
making your Halloween plans, 
don't forget to include Antioch's 
first annual Halloween Howl on 
your agenda. 

Friday, Oct. 29, will bring an 
evening of spooks, haunts, bar- 
gains, pumpkin contests, 
hayrides and goblins to down- 
town . Antioch. Saturday after- 
noon and evening will also 
Include a costume contest and, 
possibly, a large bonfire. 
Saturday's activities will run early 
In the evening to allow you 
spooks plenty: of time to attend 
those wild private Halloween 
parties afterwards. 

The Halloween Howl means, 
you need to be in the right "spir- 
it" to enjoy the .Haunted 
Walkways created by the people 
of Antioch. Try the Happy 
Haunted Graveyard, perfect for 
the younger child— you'll only 
find happy ghosts there. Or for 



the more daring person, try out 
the Mummy's Tomb for size. If 
that isn't enough for you, head 
for the Tunnel of Terror and try 
your luck. If you're starting to get 
hungry, don't forget to experi- 
ence the Witch's Kitchen, where 
you'll find lots of "appetizing'* 
specialties. Dracula's Cave is a 
must for those fans of Friday the 
13thl 

Friday night you'll And pump- 
kins lining the streets for the 
Pumpkin Decorating and Carving 
Contests. Saturday night promis- 
es to be a "hair-raising" event 
with the costume contest, bonfire 
and storyteller. Hayrides will take 
place Friday afternoon and 
evening, as well as all Saturday 
afternoon. If you won't wear a 
costume, have your face painted 
by one of the leading face 
painters in our area Face paint- 
ing will take place Friday late 
afternoon and evening and 
Saturday afternoon. 

With darkness approaching 
earlier and earlier as fall progress- 
es, the Howl will be combined 
with a Moonlight Madness sale 
throughout downtown. 

Beginning on Friday and last- 



ing through Saturday (or possibly 
Sunday for some stores), there 
will be plenty of spooky price 
slashing. Stores will remain open 
till 11 p.m. on Friday with slash- 
ing prices occurring hourly at 
some shops. Dress in costume 
either night or day for additional 
savings at participating stores. 
Watch out for creatures lurking 
inside the shops, I've heard many 
creepy talcs of vampires and 
ghouls that will be waiting to 
"serve" you in the shops during 
the Howl. 

Kids of all ages (including you, 
Grandma and Grandpa) will 
enjoy the atmosphere and festivi- 
ties that Antioch has planned for 
you. Bring your appetites with 
you to enjoy some ghoulish fare 
at participating restaurants. You 
never know, perhaps you'll come 
across some blood soup or eye-, 
.ball stew, perfect for the damp, 
cool evenings of the .Howl. Bring 
the family, bring your friends. 
The Howl is great for everyone. . 

Editor's note: Shop Antioch is a 
weekly newsletter showcasing 
Antioch's merchants and retailers. 
Prepared and written by Barbara 
Porch of Choosey Child. 



Aerobics 

Adult aerobics classes will be 
held Monday, Wednesday and ... 
Friday mornings from 6:15 to 7:1 5 
a.m. at the Antioch Senior Center, 
817 Holbek Dr. CI ass meets Oct. 3 
to Dec. 23. Fee is $40 for resi- 
dents, $45 for township residents 
and $50 for others. 

Boys basketball 

Boys basketball is a seven week 
clinic-style program for boys 9 to 12 
years old which meets on Monday 
nights. After registration, the coach 
will divide the players into two 
groups. One group will play in the 
Petty Gym from 5:45 to 7 p.m., the 
other at the Antioch Upper Grade 
School from 7 to 8:15 p.m. Parents 
will be notified prior to the first 
meeting which group their son has 
been assigned. Clinic dates are Nov. 
14, 21, 28, Dec. 5, 12 and fan. 2 and 
9. Fee is $30. 

Bridge lessons 

The park district is looking for 
persons interested In learning how 
to play Bridge. If enough interest is 
shown, they will start a class. Call 
Cheryl at 395-2160. Sunday, Sept 
25. It meets at the Antioch Senior 
Center, 817 Holbek Dr. and costs 
$120 per couple. 

line dancing 

The park district wants to 
hold aline dancing class, but can- 
not until there is a minimum of 
20 people signed up. Call 395- 
2160 if interested. 

Sign language for fun 

This eight week class is for 
beginners, focusing on the finger 
spelling of the alphabet and three 
to four letter words. Hie student 
will also learn to read short words 
and sign short phrases and sen- 
tences. Open to ages 12 through 
adult, it meets on Thursdays, start- 
ing Sept 29, at the First National 
Bank of Antioch Community Room 
from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Fee is $40 for 
residents, $45 for township resi- 
dents and $50 for others. 

Tumbling and things 

Tumbling class includes 
warm up, flexibility exercises, for- 
ward and backward rolls and 
much more. The class will be 
divided into four week sessions. It 
is for ages 4 - years and up and 
meets at the Antioch Senior 



Center on Tuesdays from 6:30 to 

7:30 p.m. Cost is $22. 

Young Rembrandfs 

Young Rcmbrandts is a drawing 
program for children. Basic drawing 
and observation skills arc Incorpo- 
rated into this program, as well as 
learning and practicing different 
shapes, lines, textures and tech- 
niques. All materials are supplied 
Each session is four weeks, with the 
first one starting Sept 23, the second 
Oct 21. Fee for each session is $25 
for residents, $30 for township res- 
idents and $35 for others; 

For more Information call the 
parks and recreation office at 
395-2160. 



Fox Waterway Agency may move to new location 



TINALSWIECH 

Staff Reporter 

McHenry might just be the 
new home for the Fox Waterway 
Agency. 

-The Agency has had its marine 
base In Fox Lake for about the past 
five years, and officials are becom- 
ing distressed over the location. 

Building commissioner Ken 
Buchardt said the former DuBeU's 
property on the Fox Lake near Rta 
12 is zoned B-4 Resort/Business. 
Buchardt said what would be 
more compatible for the Agency 



marine base- would be if it were 
zoned for marina use. 

The building commissioner 
said he has sent several letters to 
Dr. William Dam,, chairman of 
the Agency, regarding the reloca- 
tion of the marine base. 

Because the village felt noth- 
ing had been accomplished, they 
requested an answer from Dam. 
" 'Consider it done, ' " Dam told 
officials at the last village board 
meeting. 

The chairman said he has 
been working with the. Illinois 



Department of Transportation's 
department of water resources, 
to help them find a new location 
to purchase. Currently the 
Agency is leasing the property in 
Fox Lake. 

Dr. Dam noted there arc 
three Agency board members 
from Antioch Township and 
three board members from 
McHenry County. Moving to 
McHenry looks favorable, said 
Dam. And he added none of the 
taxpayers money will be used in 
the move. 




CoMMUNity CaIenqar 



, - ■ . -;■■-■■ ■''."■ 

. ;- • * ' t i - . ' ' i .'v " : '■" 1 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Friday 



30 



9 am;- Friends of Antioch 
4 p.m. Library hold .book 
sale. After 1 p.m — 
bag of books, $1. 
395-6588 

8 p.m. PM8d. presents 

. "Annie.* Tickets- 
adults $8 advance, 
$9 at door. 395- 
3055 



Saturday 



l 



Tuesday 



2 p.m. Antioch Public 
and library holds class 

7 p.m. " on using computer 
catalog. 395-0874 

7:30 p.m. St. Peter Council of 
Catholic Women 
meets at Parish Hall. 
395-0274 



1 a.m.- Friends of Antioch 
4 p.m. Library hold book 
sale. 395^588 

4 p.m.- Northern Illinois 
8 p.m. Conservation Club 
holds flsh boll din- 
ner. 395-NICC 

8 p.m. PM&L presents 

~Annle/ Tickets- 
adults $8 advance, 
$9 at door. 395- 
3055 



Sunday 



2:30 p.m. PM&L presents 

"Annie." Tickets- 
adults $8 advance, 
$9 at door. 395- 
3055 



Monday 



Wednesday 



9 a.m.- 

10 a.m. 



Line dancing at 
Antioch Senior 
Center 



10:30 am. Sing-a-long at 
Antioch Senior 
Center 

8 p.m. Safe Place hosts 
support group for 
battered women. 
Call for Round Lake 
location, 249-5147 



Thursday 



9:30 a.m.- Lakeland Newcom- 
1 1:30 a.m. ers Club hosts 

Mother's coffee at 
St. .Mark In Linden- 
hurst. Open to all; 
children welcome, 
356-8153 

7:30 p.m.- Country dancing at 
10:30 p.m. VFW. $4 per person. 
Beginners through 
advanced wel- 
come. 395-4915 



12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center. 
Anyone over 60 
welcome 

7 p.m. Multiple Sclerosis 
support group 
meets at Antioch 
Moose Lodge 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Village 
Board meets 



Coming Up: 



Oct. 15 



Holiday Craft 
Show hosted by 
VFW Post 4551, 
Antioch. 395- 
6934 



■GOT SOMETHING G0INGON? CALL USt Tina Reulbach 223-8161. 



. . • I \ \ 



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* : COMMUNITY L/IeIanc] NwspApEK Si P TEnl>« JO, 1994 



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PADS to open homeless shelters 



The CONNECTION/PADS 
(Public Action to Deliver Shelter) 
program is ready ,on October 1 to 
begin it's seventh season serving 
the homeless people of Lake 
County. Over 2,400 trained vol- 
unteers from local congrega- 
tions, organizations and groups 
will be providing shelter, food 
and hospitality during the cold 
weather months to individuals 
and families who have no place 
to call home. 

There arc PADS shelters locat- 
ed in Antioch, Grayslakc, Gurncc, 
Llbcrtyvillc, Lindcnhust, 

Mundclcin, Wauconda, 

Waukcgan and Wildwood. They 



open at 7 p.m. and close at 7 a.m. 
from October 1 through April 30, 
There arc at least two and some- 
times three shelters open each 
night. They are located in 14 
churches and one park district 
facility. Dinner and breakfast arc 
provided. Guests arc also given a 
sack lunch before leaving in the 
morning. Individuals and families 
needing a place to spend the night 
arc welcome on a first-come basis. 
Limited shuttle bus service is pro- 
vided from the Township Office In 
.downtown Waukcgan to the out- 
lying shelters that guests would 
otherwise not be able to reach. 
PADS+ daytime resource cen- 



ter at 214 S. Genesee in down- 
town Waukcgan is open all year 
long to provide outreach help for 
PADS, guests seeking guidance 
for employment, housing, health 
care, etc to help themselves out 
of homclcssncss. PADS+ is open 
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday 
through Friday. 

Special orientation classes arc 
available to prepare anyone over 
18 who is Interested in becoming 
a PADS volunteer. Orientations 
are scheduled at the College of 
Lake County on October 11 from 
7 to 9 p.m. For more information, 
call, the CONNECTION/PADS 
office at 362-3381.. 



LOCAL CriURCrlES 



Assembly Of God: 

CHRISTIAN LIFE FELLOWSHIP, 
41625 N. Deep Lake Road, 
Antioch, 395-8572. 
Services: Sunday at 10 a.m. and 
6:30 p.m.; Wednesday at 7 p.m. 
Sunday school at 9 a.m. 

Baptist: 

CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH, 
554 Parkway, 
Antioch, 395-3393. 
Services: Sunday at 1 1 a.m.; 
Sunday school at 9:45 a.m. 

Bible Church: 

CHAIN OF LAKES COMMUNITY 

BIBLE CHURCH, 

23201 W. Grass Lake Road, 

Antioch, 838-0103. 

Services: Sunday at 8:15 

a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; 

Sunday school at 9:45 a.m. 

Episcopal: 

ST. IGNATIUS EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH, 
977 Main St., 
Antioch, 395-0652. 
Services: Sunday at 7:30 a.m. 
and 9:30 a.m., Wednesday at 8 



Where to Write 
Representatives 

U.S. Senators 
Paul Simon (D) 

230 S. Dearborn St. 
Room 3892 
Chicago, IL 60604 
426 Dirksen Senate Office 
Washington, D.C. 20510 
Carol Moseley-Braun (D) 
230 S.- Dearborn St. 
Room 3996 
Chicago, IL 60604 
320 Hart Senate Bldg, 
Washington, D.C. 20510 
U.S. Representatives 
Philip Crane (R) 
8th Congressional Dist. 
1450 S. New WIlkeRd. 
Suite 101 

Arlington Heights, IL 60005 
233 Cannon House 
Office Bldg. 
Washington, DC 2051 5 
State Senators 
Adeline Geo-Karis 
31st Senatorial Dlst. 
2612 Sheridan Rd., 
Suite 213 Zlon, IL 60099 
323 State House 
Springfield, IL 62706 
State Representatives 
Robert Churchill 
62nd Representative Dlst.. 
976 Hillside Ave. 
Antioch, IL 60002 
Room 300 State House 
Springfield IL 62706 






a.m. and 7 p.m.; Sunday 

school at 9:30 a.m. 

Evangelical-Free: 

ANTIOCH EVANGELICAL FREE 

CHURCH, 

42457 N. Highway Drive, 

Antioch, 395-4117. 

Services: Sunday at 8: 15 am., 

1 1:00 a.m. and 6 p.m., 

Wednesday at 6 p.m.; Sunday 

School at 9 am., Awana Club on 

Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. 

Lutheran— Evangelical: 

ST. STEPHEN LUTHERAN 

CHURCH, 

1155 Hillsdale Ave., 

Antioch, 395-3359. 

Services Sunday at B a.m., 9:15 

a.m. and 10:30 am.; Sunday 

school at 9 a.m., 

(June -Labor Day, Sunday 

services at 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., 

No Sunday school). 

Lutheran— Wisconsin Synod: 

FAITH EVANGELICAL 
LUTHERAN CHURCH, 
1275 S. Main, 

Antioch, 395-1660 or 395-1665. 
Services: Sunday at 8 a.m. and 
10:30 a.m.; Sunday school at 
9:25 a.m. 

Non-Denominational: 

RUSSELL COMMUNITY 

CHURCH, 

14610 W.Russell Road, 

Russell, 395-4939. Service: 

Sunday at 10:15 a.m.; Sunday 



school at 9 a.m. 

Roman Catholic: 

ST. PETER'S CATHOLIC 
CHURCH, 
557 Lake St, 
Antioch, 395-0274. 
Services: Saturday at 5:30 p.m., 
Sunday at 6:30 am., 8 am., 9:30 
a.m., 11 am. and 12:15 p.m. 
(Latin); Weekdays at 7:15 am. 
and 8:00 am. 

ST BENEDICT'S ABBEY & ST. 
CATHERINE BENET LAKE 
CENTER, Nelson Road, 
Benet Lake, Wis., 
(414) 396-4351. Services: 
Saturday at 5 p.m. and Sunday 
at 10:30 am 

United Church Of Christ; 

MILLBURN CONGREGATIONAL 
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST, 
Comer of Grass Lake Road and 
Rte. 45, 

Millbum, 356-5237. 
Services; Sunday at 8:30 a.m. 
and 10 am.; Sunday School at 
10 a.m. 

United Methodist 

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 
OF ANTIOCH, 
848 Main, 
Antioch, 395-1259. 
Services: Sunday at 8:30 a.m. 
and 10:45 am. Sunday school at 
9:30 a.m. (Summer services on 
Sunday at 8 ani. and 9:30 a.m.). 



State Farm 
Sells Life Insurance. 



Michelle Wolf 

1724 E. Grand Ave. 

Lindenhurst 

(708) 356-3353 



^ 



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IHtUIANCI 



State Farm Lift Insurance Company 
Home Office Bioonwvgton, H inert* 




Mid-American 

Heating & Air Conditioning 



Serving Lake & Mchenry Counties 




Donate to Snowflake 

Linda Egram, social worker for the Antioch Upper Grade 
School, accepts a $100 check for the Snowflake program 
•from Antioch VFW Past Commander Stan Jendras and VFW 
Public Relations Director Al Hlmber. 



Dist. 34 teachers receive masters 

Antioch School Dlst. 34 Board of Education has announced that 
the following teachers completed and received their master's degrees 
within the past 12 months: Kim Kleisner, third grade teacher and 
Michelle Malo, second grade teacher at Oakland Elementary School; 
Elaine Hofman and Judy LaPlante, fourth/fifth grade teachers, and 
Diane Loughlin, fifth grade teacher at the W.C. Petty Elementary 
School; Sandra Borries, math teacher. Christopher Bryant, Social stud- 
ies teacher, Margaret Segersten, science and computer teacher, and 
Sharon Stidfole- Sortie, social studies /reading/ language arts teacher at 
the Antioch Upper Grade School. 

School board member Ken Cichon noted that the Antioch Board of 
Education encourages its staff to further their education. "After all," he 
said, "as they advance their knowledge and expertise, the more effec- 
tive they are in working with and nurturing our students." 




Patricia Nlbblo.LCSW 

708-526-8737 



Ton. Rey, LCSW 
708-945-5827 



Eld* Bennett, LCSW 
708-526-5533 



COUNSELING CENTER 

DEVELOPING SELF ESTEEM 

Gradual steps towards self-understanding, direction & self-esteem 
Hda Bennett, LCSW Oct. 3 -Nov. 14 

(708)526-5533 10:00 am - 12:00 noon 

Call for further information 

PARENTING WORKSHOP < 2 PART 

Learn: To survive and thrive as a parent 
„ Positive parenting skills 
How effective discipline develops positive self-esteem 
$60 per family* Sat. Oct. 29, 2-4 p.m. 

Toni Rey, LCSW Sat. Nov. 5, 2-4 p.m. 

(708)945-5827 . 

PROGRESSIVE RELAXATION 

For anxiety & stress 
Elda Bennett, LCSW Oct. 6 - Nov. 10 

(708) 526-5533 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon 

CALL FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 
1 1 Sf E. LIBERTY WAUCONDA, IL 




1-800-283-4500 

•24 Hour Emergency Service 
•All Makes & Models 




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INTEREST RATE WILL NEVER CHANGE! 



SIMPLY CONTACT A MORTGAGE OR CONSUMER LENDING OFFICER IN 
ANTIOCH, LINDENHURST OR OUR NEW GRAYSLAKE OFFICE 
NEW ADVANCES OF 8 5,000 OR MORE. 

•$5000 APPRAISAL, TITLE AND RECORDING FEES FOR AMOUNTS UNDER $50,000 

$100.00 APPRAISAL, TITLE AND RECORDING FEES FOR AMOUNTS 

BETWEEN $50,000 AND $100,000 

(Otter Effective Through October 31, 1994) 



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"^^^R^oncommun^b an^/or^rlOO^ LINDENHURST ^SLAKE ' ^JJ™ 

s — : — : 2031 E. Grand Avenue 50 Commerce Drive 440 Lake Street 

Antioch £ Qrayslake - Undenhurst Lindenhurst, IL 60046 Grayslake, IL 60030 Antioch, IL 60002 

fC^ (708) 356-5700 (708) 548-2700 (708) 395-2700 






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l] COMMUNITY LaIceIancI Newspapers SiprcMbER 70, 1994 



1 



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■ 



Share Food program is back, great way to volunteer, save money 



The new Share Food program 
is back In Antioch. It Is coming 
from Milwaukee, Wis., and the 
cost is $14.50 per order. To get 
into the program you need to 
volunteer two hours of time to 
the community, I.e. church, 
school, scouts, 4-H, helping an 
elderly neighbor, etc. If you're 
unable to do this, but you can 
knit, you can help the program 
by knitting or crocheting hats, 



scarves, lap robes, etc. Just call 
and volunteers will get the yarn 
to you and when you arc done, 
they'll pick up the finished 
product and distribute it back 
into the community where 
needed. 

For those of you who don't 
know what Share is all about— 
you volunteer your time, and 
give $14.50 to the Share program 
and once a' month you will 



receive $35 to $40 worth of food. 
Since Share is coming from 
Milwaukee, they have to add a 
transportation fee. 

If you arc already doing com- 
munity service, great! If not help 
they can help you get Involved. 
Share is a way of saying thank 
you for helping your communi- 
ty. 

There arc several areas in the 
community for you to sign up: 



Fish 



From page Al 

with the fish for two to three 

years," he said. 

The conservation officers will 
then do surveys in order to mon- 
itor growth, check for disease, 
and to monitor fish movement. 



The officers hope to continue to 
work with local fishing enthusi- 
asts and area ccologists on future 
projects. 

Another fish release is 
planned this ■ week. The 
Minnesota Musky Farm will be 



meeting South of the Border 
Musky Club to release approxi- 
mately $10,000 to $11,000 worth 
of muskics. The fish arc expected 
to be 9 to 12-inches in length. 
These fish will be released in 
Loon Lake as well as the Chain. 



Crash 



From page Al 

Mad son was not Injured. Coglcy 

is listed in critical condition with 

head and chest injuries and is in a 

coma. 

The accident occurred at 



North Avenue and Long View, 
near Oakwood Knolls 

Subdivision. Coglcy was ticketed 
for improper lane usage. 

Watkins noted sadly the large 
amount of fatal and near fatal 



accidents in Antioch. "This year 
we have had more fatalities than I 
can ever remember," he said. 
Watkins believes it is the result of 
the increased population and 
greater traffic. 



First National Bank, Antioch; 
State Bank of the Lakes, Antioch; 
Lake Villa Township office and of 
course on the day of delivery at 
the Antioch VFW hall on North 
Ave. in Antioch. 

The following are dates in 
which you must have your money 
lntp the Share program in order 
to be able to pick up your order, 
October 4; delivery October 22; 
November 3, delivery November 
19 and December 1 with a 



December 17. delivery date. 

You must pick up your order 
between 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. 
on the above dates at. the 
Antioch VFW Hall located at 75 
North Ave. 

Call if you arc willing to help 
unload orders, we can use all the 
muscles that arc available. 

If you have additional ques- 
tions, call Ardccn Harris at 395- 
2761 or Claudcttc Skvarcc at 
395-6744. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

. LAKE COUNTY - IN PROBATE 
In the Matter of the Estate of 

SOPHIE MASILUNAS No. 94 P 791 

Deceased 

CLAIM NOTICE 
Notice is given of the death of SOPHIE MASILUNAS of Antioch, 
Illinois. Letters of office were issued on August 29th, 1994, to Kenneth 
M. Clark, 425 Lake St, Antioch, Illinois 60002 whose attorney is himself. 
Claims against the estate may be filed In the office of the Clerk of the 
Circuit Court at 18 N. County Street, Waukegan, Illinois 60065 Room 
C-104 or with representative, or both, on or before March 30, 1995 
which date is not less than six months from the date of the first publi- 
cation of this notice and any claim not fifed within that period is barred. 
Copies of this claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to. 
the representative and to the attorney within 10 days after it is filed. 
FILED: Aug. 29, 1994 0994E-179-AR 

Sally D. Coffeft, Circuit Clerk September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 
October 14, 1994 



V. 



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PUBUC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION 
OF Bonnie Kathleen McLaln, 
minor, by parent Kim Cathie Chapln 
FOR 
CHANGE OF NAME 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 
Notice is hereby given that on November 15, 1994, being one of the 
return days in the Circuit Court of the County of Lake, I will file my 
Petition in said Court praying for the change of my name from Bonnie 
Kathleen McLain to that of Bonnie Lynn Chapin, pursuant to the Statute 
in such case made and Provide. 

Dated at Grayslake, Illinois, Sept. 22, 1994 



v 



* • 



I 



3 



li 



Kim Cathie Chapin 

0994E-184-AR 

September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 

October 14, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY - IN PROBATE 
In the Matter of the Estate of 

ALTA MAE TURNER No. 94 P 792 

Deceased 

CLAIM NOTICE 

Notice is given of the death of ALTA MAE TURNER of Antioch, 
Illinois. Letters of office were issued on August 29th, 1994, to THOMAS 
F. TURNER, 11514 4th Ave., Kenosha, Wl 53143 whose attorney is 
KENNETH M. CLARK, 425B Lake Street, Antioch, Illinois 60002. 

Claims against the estate may be filed in the office of the Clerk of the 
Circuit Court at 18 N. County Street, Waukegan, Illinois 60085 Room 
C-104 or with representative, or both, on or before March 30, 1995 
which date is not less than six months from the date of the first publi- 
cation of this notice and any claim not fifed within that period is barred. 
Copies of this claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to 
the representative and to the attorney within 10 days after -it is filed. 

0994E-180-AR 

September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 

October 14, 1994 




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SepTtwbtn 70, 1994 UkElANd Newspapers COMMUNITY 








Miwiifc 



era 



Sequoits test ^rls golf 

Mte^CE AI2 

Sequoitsremamaindefeat^ 
din NSC -PAGE All 

Iihclen sbceer 



out soccer 
team scores. PAGE A 1 5 

For More 
Sports/Leisure 
See Pacje G56 




North Suburban 

; Conference \:y : j-'^^iv" 
•:c6hf.;-:j6v«r«U' 

Ubertyvtlk 14-L - 4-1 
North Chlcago^4-l ^ 4-1 
Sleyenion 31 3-2 

Warren 2-2 3-2 

Zion-Iknton; 2-2 2 : 3 . 
Mundekln ; 2-3;l 2-3 
Antioch S :'& \i 2-2 2-3 
Lake Forest 1-3 l-4 : 
VFenton 0-5 0-5 

Northwest Suburban 
Conference 

: Conf. OyenUI- 

Crayvlike 1-0 2 3 

Marian Central 1-0 50 

Round Uke 1-0 1-4 

Grant 0-1 ? 6-5 

Johnaburg Ojl 0-5^ 

'••' WaucorkU ; . • •,:. 0-1 . 0-5'" 

East Suburban p$| 

Catholic Conference 

Conf. Overall 

SL Patrick 3-0 ^-0- 

lalietCathoUc , 3-0 4 1 
MariahGath6llc3-0 3-2 .; 
SL Viator 2-1 3-2 

Marist": 2-1 '•-, 3-2 

Carmel 1-2 2-3; 

NotrcDarne 1-2 1-4 
Holy Cross ; ;:] . 0-3 2 3 
Benct AcaderayiX)-3 ; ' ; 0-5 

^SL;IoscphX: 3 °- 5 

Fox Valley Conference 

'■':■■■/■ Conf. V Overall ■' . 
Lake Zurich 3-0 n5-0 v 
McHchry 3-0 5-0 

DundeeCrown 2-1 3-2 -<^ 

dCenUa! ::i-2: ; : vv 2-3;\: 
CL South 1-2 1-4 

-Jacobs 1-2 3-2 

Woodstock 1-2 1-4 
Gary Grove 0-3 2-7 

Aritiocli Golf 

Chit) to offer 
winter series 

The AntlbcK Gtolf Club 
announced its new "Hearty 
Golf Classic Tournament 

Beginning In December 
and running through March, 
1995, the Antioch Golf Club 
will host a different event each 
month m me golfer who is 
hearty of spirit arid docs not 
let Crilcago £ ^winters deter 
them from ^'teleJng it up.T 

Before thetiew series, the 
Antirxh course is holo^its; 
two-person . scramble 
"Otobberfest* Cost is $64. 
Eri«iescl6s^Gcti7. 






Antioch soccer Coach Brad 
Wilson said fan support played a 
big role in Antioch's 2-1 victory 
over soccer rival Steven son. 

"The extra fan support cer- 
tainly helped, especially after we 
took the lead," said Wilson, who 
estimated that 200 Antioch fans 
made the trip to Lincolnshire for 
the North Suburban Conference 
showdown. "It sent tingles down 
my spine and it gave us a charge 
which allowed us to step it up a 
notch," he added. 

Playing In "messy, rainy" con- 
ditions, the Scquoits defeated the 
Patriots at their home field. 
Stevenson has been ranked as 
high as No, 2 in the state, and 
Antioch shared the NSC crown 



Sequoit 

with Stevenson and Llbcrtyviile 
last year, The Scquoits dropped a 
4-2 game against Llbcrtyviile the 
week before. 

"We didn't play exceptionally 
well against Llbcrtyviile, We're 

"The extra fan support 
certainly helped/ 
especially after we 
took the lead.' 

-Brad Wilson 
ACHS Soccer Coach 

hoping that Stevenson can come 

back and beat Llbcrtyviile and 

then we're right back i n the race, " 

Stevenson scored first, but 

Antioch midfielder Brian Weeks 




in 2-1 victory over Pat's 



tied the game with a header from 
a throw-In from Jon Zora. 

Weeks also played a role in 
the game-winning goal Joe Earl 
volleyed the ball past the 
Stevenson goalie following a cor- 
ner kick from Weeks, who lofted 
the ball over Stevenson players 
defending the goalie box. 

Allowing only nine shots on 
goal, Antioch's defense kept 
Stevenson's explosive offense 
from approaching the net, 
although goalie Keith Jackson 
made some tough saves. 

"Pretty much the whole game, 
we played a nice tight defensive 
game," Wilson said. 

In the 4-2 loss to Llbcrtyviile, 
Earl and Lane Bcnzigcr scored for 



Antioch. In a non-conference 
match, Antioch tied McHenry 1- 
1. Kevin" Erlcksbii dribbled 
through a host of McHenry. 
defenders in a 60-yard breakaway 
score. . 

"After a couple of slumping 
games, we were able to bring it 
back together against 

Stevenson," said Wilson. Antioch 
was 11-3-1 overall and 1-1 in the 
conference before hosting Lake 
Forest Thursday and traveling to 
Mundclcin Tuesday. 

"I think we had more fans 
than Stevenson did," said Wilson 
of Antioch's fans at the Stevenson 
away game. "Hopefully, we're 
turning some people into soccer 
fans." 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Scquoits to regroup after battle with No. 1 team 



Antioch's football season has 
been Uke a seesaw so far. Up and 
down, down' and up. The contest 
against Rockford Boyian proved no 
different, as the Sequoits played a 
strong first half, but lost its compet- 
itiveness in the second half. 

The Sequoits suffered a 42-13 
defeat. Rockford Boyian also hap- 
pens to be the number one team 
in the state. 

.,; "When you go against the 
number one team in the state, it's 
going to be a battle," said Antioch 
Coach Del Pechauer. 

His Sequoits 'kept It close in 
the first half. Rockford scored 
twice on an 18-yd. run and a 54- 
yd . :. interception touchdown 
return. Antioch walked off the 
field at halftime trailing 13-0, 

Shortly into the second half, 
Antioch running back Brad 
Rubash broke through the line for 
a 54-yd. touchdown run. 
Quarterback Walter Martens con- 
nected with Rubash for the two- 
point conversion, and Antioch 
Was back In business losing 13-8. 

"We were right in the game 
until the third quarter," said 
Pechauer. 

After that score, it was all 
Rockford, who managed to find 



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the end zone four more times. 
One of Rockford's scores was a 
70-yd. punt return. 

"We had a breakdown on spe- 
cial teams the last couple of 
games, so we're going to try to 
improve that," said Pechauer. 

Antioch's final score came on 
a 3-yd. reception to wide receiver 
Justin Jenison from Martens. 
Jenison caught an earlier pass 
good for 51 yards. 

The game was not without 
some fine individual perfor- 
mances, Pechauer said. Safety 
Dan Newcomb had eight solo 



tackles and knocked down four 
passes intended for Rockford 
receivers. Eric Dams also record- 
ed three sacks. 

The Scquoits will return to ' 
North Suburban Conference 
action Saturday when they travel 
to Lake Forest Antioch is now 2-2 
in the NSC and 2-3 overall, mak- 
ing every game important if the 
Sequoits hope to see some play- 
off action. 

"We'll try to get this win on' 
Saturday and go from there," 
Pechauer said. 



Youth Vikings can see game for free 

For the second straight week, Antioch Vikings youth football players 
and cheerleaders will be allowed into a Lake County Vikings game free 
of charge if they wear a uniform. Family members will be charged $2. 

The Lake County Vikings semi-pro team hosts Racine at Round 
Lake High School at 6 p.m. 




Brad Rubash dash©* for a 52- 
yd. TD reception.— Photo by 
Steve Young 



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Rams 9 'Little freshman 9 Lady golfers top Deerfield, Rockow places seventh 



makes quite an impact 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

Gmyslake soccer Coach Paul 
Missavagc was impressed with a 
player his teammates call "the lit- 
tle freshman" right from the start. 

"He is awesome. He is a dan- 
gerous player and that is what we 
have on this team, a group of dan- 
gerous players, not just one or two 
goal scorers/' Missavagc said. 

Brian Phillip is the player who 
wears No. 4 and was receiving his 
share of accolades following a 5-3 
win over Round Lake. 

Phillip and Peter Szcntcndrei 
both scored two second-half goals 
in the entertaining second half. 

"I thought I would make var- 
sity, but I did not think I would 
play that much," Phillip said. 

Phillip had several close miss- 
es in the first 40 minutes, which 
were turned away by Round Lake 
goalie Henry Campos. 

"They went for some long balls 
in the second half and that gave 
us some brcak-aways," Phillip 
said. 

The win gives Grayslakc a 4-0 
Northwest Suburban Conference 
record and the league lead. 

"We played decent, but not 
good enough to win," Round Lake 
Coach Dob Cumin said. 

Steve Prior scored first in the 
match's opening five minutes off 
a throw-in. The former Califor- 
nian notched his seventh goal. 

The Rams Jason Patterson 
handled all good Round Lake 
scoring chances as the first half 



ended with a 1-0 Rams lead. 

Julio Duran tied the match af- 
ter dribbling some 20 yards on a 
break-away with 33:59 left. 

A controversial penalty kick 
was called less than a minute later 
and Macario Quevcdo beat 
Patterson on a shot above the . 
goalie for a 2-1 Round Lake lead. 

Szcntcndrei scored the first of 
his two goals five minutes later on 
a header for a 2-2 tie. 

Phillip took over, scoring at 
the 27:45 mark as he rebounded 
his own shot and another goal for 
a 4-2 Rams lead. 

Sikifredo Tovar scored for 
Round Lake for a 4-3, but Szcn- 
jendrei scored at the 10:21 mark 
to pad the home team's margin. 

"This win is very big for us. 
Our goal is to win the conference 
and this is a big step to that But 
we know the other teams will be 
tough in the second half," Mis- 
savage said. 

The Rams Improved to 7-3-1 
with the win, coming back from a 
disappointing . 2-2 tic against 
Mundelcin. 

"We rebounded the way we 
should have. This is a very tight- 
knit group and they deserved the 
win," Missavage said. 

Missavagc noted the com- 
munity and parental support the 
team receives. 

The Rams are at the McHenry 
tournament Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 
before resuming the league tide 
quest by hosting Marian Central 
Oct. 5. 





Lakeland Newspapers wants to -hear news 
of local sporting events, clubs, organiza- 
tions, etc. Black and white photos are also 
welcome. Please send news Items to 
Claudia M. Leriart 30 S. Whitney, Grdyslake, 
60030 or call 223-8161. 



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The Antioch High School lady 
golfers completed another busy 
week out on the links with two 
wins and two losses. The Scquolts 
were defeated by Marengo (233- 
197) and Palatine (227-222), and 
came back with big wins over 
Dcerfield (233-264) and Evanston 
(167-224). 

Antioch scores . In the 
Dcerfield/Marengo match includ- 
ed: Sarah Murphy-55, Kelly 
Periman-57, Sarah Rockow-59, 
Marrissa Blasko-62, Angle 
Pcdcrson-63, and Lisa Murphy-63. 
- In the five-stroke loss to 
Palatine at Palatine Hills Golf 
Club, Scquolt scores . included 
Rockow-52, Sarah Murphy-57, 
Lisa Murphy-58, BIasko-60, 
Pederson-60, and Pcriman-76. 



The four low scores totaling 
227 were 40 strokes better than 
last year on the same course. 

In the Evanston match, Sarah 
Murphy and Rockow each carded 
a 39, followed by Lisa Murphy-44, 
Pcderson-45, Blasko-50, and 
Pcriman-51, 

The 167 on the Peter Jans Golf 
Course in Evanston is another 
team best for the Lady Scquoits. 

Antioch coach Steve Wapon 
said, "The par-34 course was a 
challenging test for our short 
game on tight fairways. You still 
have to chip and putt in order to 
score. I felt as a team bur course 
management was good." 

The Antioch junior varsity 
team scores from Evanston 
included Jessica Shore-42, Jessica 



Schmitt-54, Krlsta Workman-57, 
Abigail Clark-50, April Bolton-63, 
Crystal Divls-05 and Laura 
Czlczo-90. 

ACHS lady golfer Sarah Rockow 
brought home the seventh-place 
medal from the Antioch 
Invitational held at Hunter 
Country Club this past weekend. " 

Rockow, a sophomore, carded 
an 18-holc score of 99, followed 
by Periman-114, Lisa Murphy- 
116, Blasko-122, Pedcrson-123, 
Jessica Shore-132 and DcAnne 
DaIgaard-139. 

Team scores in the tourna- 
ment included Libertyvillel-393, 
Kenosha-Tremper-395, Lake 
Forest-396, tIerscy-400, Palatine- 
432, Antioch-451, Wheeling-497 
and Stevenson-490. 



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Spikers peaking at right time 



';' Antioch's lady spikers had 
Improved their record to 12r6 
overall and remained undefeated. 
In conference action before tak- 
ing on Fenton Tuesday and 
Mundclein Friday In two key 
North Suburban Conference ' 
matches. 

Since the disappointing 
showing at the Stevenson 
Invitational, Antloch has 
regrouped* and has beaten their 
opponents In straight matches, 
nullifying the need for a third 
game. 

. The Sequoits improved their 
conference record to 3-0 after 
defeating Libertyvillc 15-8, 15-0. 
Seniors Carrie Curtis and Katy 
Harney led the Sequoits with six 
kills and 100 percent hitting. 



Junior Mary Ipscn also converted 
23 of 25 sets. 

Against Carmel, Tricia Keefc, 
another senior, put up impressive 
numbers with six kills to help 
Antloch beat the Corsairs 15-10, 
15-11. . 

"My seniors have been so 
consistent all season," said 
Antloch Coach Gwen Varney. 
Curtis, Harney and Keefc have 
been the driving force for 
Antloch. this season. Senior 
Stephanie Montgomery and 
junior Erin O'ConnclI have been 
contributing to the starting line 
up as well. 

Highland Park was no match 
for Antloch, as other non-starters 
were able to see some quality 
playing time in the 15-1, 15-5 



Scquoitvictory. 

Junior Melanlc Rodgers regis- 
tered three aces in five serving 
attempts against Highland Park/ 
Sophomore - Carrie Gofron gar- 
nered a kill and connected on all 
four of her hits. 

"They're really playing as a 
team," Varney said. "We're play- 
ing on a higher level, .which is 
where we want to be at this point 
In the season." 

After facing Fenton Tuesday, 
the Sequoits travel to Mundclein 
Friday In a key NSC matchup. 
The Mustangs arc perennial 
favorites in volleyball action. 

"We're excited," Varney. said 
of the Mundclein game. "These, 
kids don't have any problem get- 
ting up for a game." 



Lindenhurst girls 9 field mixed results 



Tina Koopfo celebrates after a winning point with teammate Mary 
Ipsbn. Antloch takes on Murtdoteln Friday at 5 p.m.— Photo by 
Todd F. Helslor 



In week three of the IWSL fall 
soccer season, five of the six girl's 
travel teams played with mixed 
results. 

Blitz 

The Blitz (U-16) remained 
undefeated .with their third 
straight win and third straight 
shutout The Libertyvillc Wildcats 
fell to the Blitz at Policy Field by a 
score of 3-0. 

A fired-up Lindenhurst team 
came out roaring at the start of 
the contest, finding the net twice 
early in the first half. 

After beating the Libertyvillc 
defender, Becca Bleyer came in 
from right-wing and rocketed in a 
shot that found the upper corner 
of the net The play was made 



possible by a perfectly placed 
pass from Jill Denoma. 

Moments later, Carrie Gofron 
was in a perfect position to punch 
home a rebound off a shot sent in 
by Bleyer. The half ended with 
the Blitz on top 2-0. 

The Blitz started the second 
half a bit flat. Libertyville was 
putting tremendous pressure on 
the Lindenhurst net, but Blitz 
goalkeeper Melissa Helbig rose to 
the occasion. 

Making several big saves, 
Helbig was superb in holding off 
the attack, while the Blitz 
regained control of the game. 

The Final Blitz goal came off an 
accurate chip pass from Carrie 
Gofron that Bleyer headed Into 
the goal. 



Other strong performances 
were turned in by Taml Wright, 
Nickl Krai, Erin Sparkman, 
Stacey Alberts, Sondra Woodruff 
and Robin Levy. 

The Blitz (3-0) travel to 
Naperville this Sunday. 

Stars 

The Stars (U- 14) suffered their 
first loss of the season by falling 
to the Arlington Aces 1-0 at Policy 
Field. 

Arlington's good defense and 
the Star being unable to convert 
several scoring chances were 
contributing factors to the loss. 

Megen Rinkenbergcr, Cheri 
Case, . Angela Tournis, Megs 
Kotlaiz and Amie Carlbcrg were 
the Lindenhurst standouts. 



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ANTIOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY OlSTRiCT 

757 N. Main Stre* ^ StpimbUJO, 1 994 UUIancI Newspapers COUN- 

AniiociilL " 





MARY FOLEY 



Staff Reporter 

Jack "Red" Anderson, the 16 year incumbent Lake. 
County Treasurer, wants to be there when the office Is 
modernized with a system upgrade. Anderson, who lias 
seen the office through numerous changes since he began 
there 36 years ago, feels he Is the best person for the job, 

"Right now, I would put this office up against any in 
Illinois," said Anderson. "1 would hate to sec it slip." 

Anderson, the Republican candidate, is running 
against Democrat Arlcnc Dcmb. He believes he is a dedi- 
cated public servant and is running on his record. And, 
Anderson's record appears to be pretty good. 

He has seen the total collections grow from $34 mil- 
lion to the current year's $716 million. He has reduced his 
staff and is particularly proud of the turn -around time 
record of his office, distributing real estate tax monies to 
taxing bodies faster than most other counties . 

"When I took over in 197B there were 28 employees," 



explained Anderson. "Now wc have only 17 full-time 
employees." 

Anderson still remembers when all of the records were 
hand-written. When he took office 90 percent of Lake 
County money was invested in Chicago banks. He had 
even found accounts earning no interest at all. All that 
has changed now, and money is invested locally in Lake 
County institutions. 

"People used to hand write things and enter payments by 
pen," he said. . Now, of course, many things are done on com- 
puter, but he believes things can be done even faster. 

Some of the new innovations with the upgrade would 
be bar codes which would allow staff to simply scan tax 
payments instead of the current system of manually typ- 
ing every number. Anderson said the current computer 
system is near capacity. 

"Our system Is to the max," he said. "The County has 
grown so immensely. Wc. can't put anymore on the sys- 
tem." 



Anderson hopes to be re-elect- 
ed so that he can assist in the con- 
version. He predicts that with the 
changes, at the most, only one 
additional employee will.be need- 
ed, and maybe not even that. 

"It will take approximately one 
and one -half to two years to con- 
vert. If wc get this system, wc won't 
need anymore employees," he said.. 
"I want to be a part of that" 

The Treasurer's Office is a very -Rod" Anderson 
busy place. Not only docs it admin- 
ister funds as the Treasurer for Lake County but the office 
also collects funds for the taxing districts. At this time 230 
taxing districts look to the County Treasurer's Office for 
disbursements. 

The office has a number of peak periods. The first 
Sec OFFICE page B3 



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A Whodunnit with 
a twist 
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Family fun 

PM&I/s'^nie" 
a family favorite 
RAGEB8 



^Domestic 
Violence 

October is 
awareness month 
PAGBB24 



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Seniors should have 
regular exams 
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Finances 

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Sandwich Generation 
'explores issues 
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violations unfounded 



MARY FOLEY 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 
Staff Reporters 

After consulting with the 
Illinois State Board of Elections, 
the Lake County Republican 
Central Committee requested an 
investigation into the voter regis- 
tration practices of Democratic 
County Clerk candidate Kathy 
Ryg. 

Ryg, the village, clerk . for 
Vernon Hills, was observed by 
Melody Miller registering Voters 
at a candidates forum at 
Trustmark, in Lake Forest. She 
was sitting under a sign stating, 
"Lake County Voter Registration 
provided by Village Clerk 
Kathleen Ryg." Ryg was also 
spotted wearing a name badge, 
"Kathy Ryg, Village Clerk." 

According to Ryg, the 
Republican allegations were 
incorrect because she has the 
authority to register voters out- 
side of Vernon Hills as a deputy 
register. "They were in error," 
said Ryg. "I have done nothing 
wrong." 



Mitchell Hoffman, of the 
State's Attorney's Office agreed. 
"Based on our review, we did not 
find any evidence of a violation," 
he said. 

Valcry Gallagher, of the 
Republican Central Committee, ' 
defended the Committee's 
actions. Gallagher said that when 
the issue was brought to their 
attention, the Committee had 
contacted .Lynn Mastrogany of 
the .'Illinois State. Board of 
Elections. "She said, to file,"- 
explained Gallagher. 

Mastrogany even sent the 
Committee a copy of a statute 
indicating the actions of Ryg were 
Improper. The relevant statute 
said, in part, "municipal and 
township or road district clerks or 
their duly authorized deputies as 
deputy registrars may accept the 
registration of all qualified resi- 
dents of their respective munici- 
palities. . ." 

The statute sent, however, 
was for counties with less than 
500,000. ' Lake County has 
approximately 516,000 people, 



and as a result, the applicable law 
permits Ryg to register voters all 
over Lake County. 

The Committee's other objec- 
tion related to Ryg sitting under a 
banner and wearing a badge with 
her name on it. However, since 
neither item had any reference to 
her campaign, Hoffman did not 
pursue the matter. "I don't sec 
that as a problem," said Hoffman. 

However, according to 
Gallagher, Mastrogany felt it was 
wrong! Gallagher said she was 
told the banner and name badge 
may "disenfranchise voters." 

"The thing that struck us," 
said Gallagher about the banner 
and badge, "is that when Willard 
(Hclander, Republican candidate 
for County Clerk) attended a class 
last summer for deputy registrars, 
she was specifically told not to 
wear a name tag." 

Gallagher said it was suggest- 
ed, during that class, that 
Helandcr not register voters at all 
during her campaign. "It can't 
be one way for a Democrat and 
another way for a Republican," 




Happy 25th 

College of Lake County alumni chefs Bob Nlles, Rick Broquet and Paul Louis wheel out the 25th 
anniversary cake during the college reunion and picnic on the College of Lake County 
grounds. Sunday. The event drew hundreds of alumni, family members and staff from through- 
out the metropolitan area. —Photo by Krlston Johnson 




Kathy Ryg 

said Gallagher. 

Ryg said she frequently brings 
a sign which states "Lake County 
Voter Registration provided by. 
Village Clerk Kathleen Ryg." She 
docs this because, "That is the 
authority by which I register vot- 
ers." 

Integrated recruit 
training underway 
at Great Lakes 

JUDY R. LAZARUS 

Staff Reporter 

Approximately 60 women 
recruits stood side by side with 
their male counterparts at the 
graduation review at Great Lakes 
Naval Training Center. 

For the first time in the base's 
history, women received their 
recruit training in integrated 
companies with men. Companies 
281 and 282 trained together in 
the classroom and in outdoor 
military drill. 

Following World War II, from 
1948 to 1951, women in the 
WAVES (Women Accepted for 
Volunteer Emergency Service) 
received recruit training at Great 
Lakes. But this was completely 
separate from the men in con- 
trast to Recruit Training 
Command's (RTC's) present sys- 
tem. 

"I didn't do anything different 
with the women," said Company 
Commander Boatswain's Mate 
Chief Petty Officer Francesca 
Sec RECRUIT page B2 



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COUNTY UIceIancJ Nev^papcrs , Sept** be* TO, 1 f 94 &3\t'd, meM 



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Awareness week activities set 



scoo 




Each year, it is estimated that 
mental illness affects more than 
three million young people, cost- 
ing the country billions of dollars 
in lost productivity, social depen- 
dence, and health care costs. 

More alarming, the elderly 
arc our fastest growing popula- 
tion segment and arc even more 
susceptible to mental illness than 
arc young people. Fortunately, 
even though mental illness is 
widely misunderstood and 
feared, It has become more treat- 
able with new techniques. 

October 1 through 7 is Mental 
Illness Awareness week. The 
theme for this year's awareness 
week is 'Treatment works, so 
people can too.' 

The Alliance for the Mentally 
111 of Lake County has a goal to 
continually work toward estab- 
lishing community vocational 
rehabilitation services 'that work' 



so people with a mental illness 
can become as productive and 
independent as possible and 
have a rewarding life. 

The Alliance will have a bevy 
of activities and seminars during 
the week at the College of Lake 
County, beginning with a 10K 
Awareness Walk. The walk 
begins at the CLC grounds Oct. 1 
at 10 a.m. 

All the events during Mental 
Illness Awareness Week arc being 
co-sponsored by The Alliance, 
CLC, Highland Park Hospital, 
Forest Hospital, Independence 
Center, Victory Memorial 
Hospital, Lake County Mental 
Health Department, and Rock 
Creek Center. 

. For more Information on the 
10K walk or the week's other 
scheduled events, call The 
Alliance at 249-1515.— by NEAL 
TUCKER 



Voter registration deadline nears 



"The last day to register to vote 
before the November general 
election is Tuesday, Oct. 1 1," said 
Linda Hess, Lake County Clerk. 

On Nov. 8, we'll be voting for 
federal, state and county offices, 
as well as for various referenda. 

"I want to emphasize that if 
you've moved recently, you will 



need to re-reglster," Hess said. If 
you've changed your name 
because you've married, you 
must also re- register. 

Anyone who is 17 years' old ' 
but will be 18 by election day 
(Nov. 8) can register now. There 
arc many places throughout Lake 
County to register to vote. 



From page 111- 

Dra'dshaw, who has been training 
recruits at Great Lakes since 1992. 
"I treated them exactly the same." 

"It went well, It was very pos- 
itive with the females here," 
noted Operations Specialist Chief 
Petty Officer Vivien nc Cousins, 
who served as company com- 
mander along with Dradshaw for 
ttic first five weeks of the training. 

Integrating the two companies 
made the men push a little harder 
and gave the females a goat, 
Cousins explained. "The women 
wanted to show they could do it 
too. It gave a balanced effect Both 
were pushing forward." 

Women recruits asked more 
questions, Bradshaw noted. 
"They would rather ask questions 
than make mistakes," she said. 
"They had no infractions on the 
street or in the barracks. And aca- 
demically they did well also." 

The belief that women cry 
more than men proved to be a 
fatsc one, according to the chief. 
"They didn't cry anymore than 
the men did," she observed. 

"During service week, we 
received compliments from all 
over the base," Bradshaw said." 
In the fifth week of training, a list 
is drawn up of where people are 
needed and recruits arc assigned 
to those areas. 



There is more stress on inte- 
grated companies than on regu- 
lar companies, Bradshaw said, 
"Because people arc not used to 
having women here. They dealt 
with it really well." 

"The men now have expert 



ence working with the women," 
Cousins noted. "Now they will 
know what to expect when they 
are with them in trie fleet." ' 

An averaging of 300 women 
recruits a week arc now coming 
to Great Lakes. 




A company commander (loft. In whlfo uniform) adjusts the com- 
pany guide-on bearer's grip on the company flag, as an Inte- 
grated recruit training company prepares to hit the streets: 
Women are once again going through boot camp at Great Lakes, 
for the first time In 43 years. This time, though, men and women 
train slde-by-sfde In the classroom and In outdoor military drill. 
(Photo courtesy Great Lakes Navy Exchange Photo Lab) 





NATURE'S BOUNTY 



"S&'&l 




Apple pudding 

Filling: 

1 pound (2-3 medium-sized) cooking 
apples 
4 cloves 

2 This, seedless raisins 
1 Tbl. lemon Juice 

1 Tbl. honey 

Batter: 

2 cups whole wheat flour 
pinch of salt 




1/3 cup honey 

2 eggs 

2 cups milk 

Preheat oven o 350 degrees. Peel, 
core, and slice the apples into the 
bottom of a greased 8x8 -inch baking 
dish. Add the cloves and raisins, 
sprinkle with lemon juice, and dab 
with honey. Mix the batter ingredients 
together in a bowl, and pour over the 
apples. Bake at 350 degrees for one 
hour. 




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At A GIance 





Suspected gun seller caught 

ROUND LAKE BEACH— Robert Pashegoba, 43, of 

Fox Lake is under 24 -hour police watch at St. Theresc 
Hospital after he allegedly tried to sell a loaded shot- 
gun at Kristof s World of Fun. In Fox Lake, he had 
reportedly had taken actions which implied he would 
rob the J&L Gas station. He was arrested on charges of 
unlawful use of a weapon in Fox Lake as well. 

Boating class offered 

FOX LAKE— Flotilla 06-11 of the United States 
Coast Guard Auxiliary announced a new boating skills 
and seamanship class which began this week. Every 
Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Fox Lake Community 
Center another class will take place. The course is free 
and the charge for books and materials is $20. For 
more information on this and future classes "please call 
Herman Schacfcr (708) 587-8407. If no answer please 
leave a message and your call will be returned. 

Student attends contest 

HAINESVIULE-Seventh grade Grayslakc Middle 
School student and Haincsville resident Colleen 
Peterson may soon be called an academic wonder. Her 
parents, Sharon and Gary are all for their daughter com- 
peting in the Prc-Tccn America ' Scholarship and 



Recognition Program in Springfield. "It's an academic 
event," said her mother, a chemistry teacher at Antioch 
Community High Schobl. "If this were a beauty thing, I 
wouldn't let her. do it." Over $5,000 in educational 
bonds, prizes and awards will he presented to the win- 
ner of Prc-Tccn Illinois. 

Development criticized 

ROUND LAKE nOGirTS— Hie zoning board is con- 
tinuing a hearing on a proposed 105-unit housing devel- 
opment by Pasquinclli Inc. on a DO-acrc parcel off Lotus 
Road. The development would be within 150 feet of the 
Fairfield Marsh, federal advanced indentification wetland.- 
Residents and Lake County Board Members criticized the 
development be cause they fear future flooding and dam- 
age to the ecosystem. The zoning board hasn't addressed 
the environmental issue and wants more information 
from the developer before giving a recommendation to 
the village board. Another meeting is slated for Oct. 3 at 
the village hall on 629 Pontiac Court. 

Blood drive for youth 

M IJNDELEIN— A community blood drive ha; been 
scheduled from 3 to 8 p.m. Sept 30 at the Community 
Protestant Church in Mundclcin, 418 N. Prairie. 
Although all blood types arc needed for general use, 
organizers hope to identify type O negative donors to 
help David Weitzcl, a 12-year-old undergoing 
chemotherapy treatments. for a brain tumor. 

Monastery seeks annexation 

GURNEE— St Sava Serbian Orthodox Monastery 
would like to be part of Gumce. Church officials pre- 
sented an annexation plan to Gurnce Village Board, 
which gave its approval to proceed. 

Park donation unacceptable 

VERNON HILLS— The Vernon Hills Park District 
feels the park plans offered by the developers of the 
Cuneo estate are 'deficient.' A park district planner 
pointed out that the majority of the park lands lie in 
100-year flood plains and wetlands. Some 39 acres of 
one parte site donated arc Lake Charles. Out of the 
approximately 71 acres donated to the park district, 



only 11.75 acres arc what park district commissioners 
deemed as "bulldable" for athletic fields or other recre- 
ational activities. Park officials said 37.5 acres would he 
necessary to serve the estimated 3,750 residents 
expected to move into the development, which has 
been named "Gregg's Landing." 

Kid's Korner opens 

IAKE COUNTY— Hie Lake County Circuit Court is 
pleased to announce the opening of the Kid's Korner, a 
waiting room for children between the ages of 3 to 12, 
located in the courthouse. The room will provide a safe 
environment for children who arc required to be in the 
courthouse. The Kid's Korner was a collaborative effort 
between many Lake County organizations and wis 
chaired by Judge Jane D. Waller. For more information 
call Carol Yates at the Fighting Back office at 546-7144. 

Composting permit undecided 

GRAYSLAKE-DK Recycling Systems, Inc., of rural 
Grayslakc, has granted the Illinois Environmental 
Protection Agency a thirty day extension to make a per- 
mit decision on its composting facility. In August, DK 
Recycling, which is owned and operated by Schroeder's 
Nursery, applied for a 2 -year extension to operate its 
composting facility at the site on Rte 60. At a public , 
hearing, the permit renewal met with staunch opposi- 
tion by neighbors of the facility, with complaints of foul 
smells intruding into their airspace. The IEPA now has 
until Oct 15 to consider the permit renewal. 

Industrial housing plan nixed 

LAKE ZURICH— The proposed developers of the 
Cuneo property in Vernon Hills have presented a plan 
to village officials for a 172-home residential project 
next to the community's industrial park. The 82-acrc 
parcel on Qucntin Road north of Route 22 is in the 
park now. Joel .[-I ill man, owner of the land, has pro- 
posed to sell the land to the Zale Companies of Buffalo 
Grove and purchase a 70-acrc tract directly to its north, 
thereby preserving the industrial park- Village trustees 
rejected the preliminary plans, saying they were too 
dense and did not provide enough open space for each 
home. 



Pesticide pollution involves many scapegoats, solutions 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 
Staff Reporter 

Pesticides, herbicides, insecti- 
cides, rodenticides, and many 
other "...cides" are chemicals 
commonly affiliated with farm- 
ing. While that may be true, they 
are also very common chemicals 
used by schools, businesses and 
homeowners to control pests on 
lawns. 

Illinois has the second highest 
use of pesticides in the country, 
and four leading environmental 
organizations have joined forces 
to address urban and rural pesti- 
cide use in a project called "Safer 
Pest Control Project." 

The project was recently 



launched in Chicago and is head- 
ed by Liz Payer, an environmen- 
tal biology instructor at the 
College of Lake County. 

"Pesticides arc a leading envi- 
ronmental problem in Illinois 
because we are such a big 
ag(riculture) state," Payer said. 
But she also noted that subur- 
banites are adding to the prob- 
lem as well with their weekly 
chemical sprayings for their 
lawns. Schools and businesses 
arc' other leading contributors to 
pesticide or chemical pollution. 

"The overall message is that 
we arc filling the environment 
with chemicals which are causing 
problems at all levels in the food 



chain," said Payer. 

She also said Lake County 
bird watchers are finding more 
and more birds with deformities 
because they are filled with 
chemicals. Although the correla- 
tion between deformed animals 
and chemicals has not been 
proven directly, she said it should 
still raise concerns among envi- 
ronmentally conscious citizens. 

The "Safer Pest Control 
Project" is not necessarily out to. 
eliminate all chemicals, rather it 
aims to promote alternatives 
through an Integrated Pest 
Management program. 1PM, 
Fayer said, "is a very effective and 
environmentally sensitive 



approach to pest management." 
Fanners, for example, could 
use smaller amounts or doses of 
pesticides on their fields, which 
also saves them money in the 
long run, she said. 1PM also intro- 
duces other biological controls, 
such as "predatory bugs that cat 
bugs eating the plants," Fayer 
said. 

As the primary resource and 
networker, Fayer hopes to 
encourage environmental groups 
to become interested in the pro- 
ject. For homeowners, schools 
and businesses that frequently 
use chemicals for their lawns, she 
will have literature and contacts 



available on how to maintain 
healthy lawns in an environmen- 
tally responsible way. 

"They are a lot of people out 
there who arc not aware that their 
schools and businesses are being 
sprayed when they arc not there," 
Fayer said. "It could be a great 
learning- project for teachers and 
students." 

Fayer pointed out that the 
harmful effects of asbestos did 
not gain people's attention 
until they realized it . had 
adverse effects on their chil- 
dren's Health. For more about' 
"Safer Pest Control Project," 
call 634-4737. 



Office 



From page Bl 
week in June and September, are 
very busy and several part-time 
employees join the regular staff. 
As a convenience to the public, 
the office is open on Saturdays 
and evenings near the penalty 
dates. "I work too," Anderson 
quipped. 

Anderson recently under- 
went surgery for an aneurysm 
in August. The surgery was very 
successful and he is already 
back on the job on a part-time 
basis. He expects to be back 
full-time by the middle of next 
month. He jokingly referred to 
other illnesses he has had over 
the years, which, seemly occur 
every six years. 

"It seems every six years 
something happens to me," 
Anderson joked. "I think I'll be 
great for the next six years." 
Anderson wants to make sure 
that voters know that he is recov- 



ering nicely and will be back "full except for the fact he delayed the 
tilt" in October. "I'm getting operation in order to fulfill some 
stronger every day," he said. obligations. "Spending more 
He said his surgery has not time than money," is his cam- 
affected his campaign much paigning creed. 



Pet of the WEEk 



Sweet Thing looking for a home 

Sweet Thing— the 
names says it all! She is 
one of the sweetest, 
most outgoing crea- 
tures we've encoun- 
tered. She'll call to 
you, like a puppy and 
stretch up her paws to 
be picked up. She's 
unusual in facial 
markings and in an 
exceptional pcrsonali- Sw©«i Thing 

ty. Another case in point for considering the adoption of adults cats in 
whom the personality is already clearly evident. 

For an adopting appointment call the Assisi Animal Foundation at 
(815)455-9411. 




Wellness weekend offers insight 

SUSAN KLEIN _^ 

Correspondent 

Area women who Find they spend most of their time doing 
for others may want to take time for themselves to attend the 
Women's Wellness Weekend. 

Long Grove resident Andrea Shainberg is touting the two-day 
seminar as an "outstanding" program for women who arc inter- 
ested in staying well or getting well. 

The Women's Wellness Weekend, which will focus on mind 
and body healing techniques, will be held on Oct. 8 and 9 from 
9 am. to 5 p.m. daily at the Ramada Woodfield Hotel at 920 E. 
Northwest Hwy. in Palatine. 

"This wonderful seminar is about women taking time for 
themselves and learning tools for staying or getting healthy," 
said Shainberg, who helped organize the seminar. 

Gail Petrowsky, M.S.W., an internationally certified therapist 
and holistic counselor, will present techniques for healing old 
patterns and wounds, energizing and empowering one's life, 
enhancing relationships and creating happiness and wellness. 

Petrowsky practices ncuro-linguistic programming, which 
stresses the connection between mind and body and employs 
relaxation techniques as the basis to effect healing. A former 
director and founder of Insight, a Connecticut-based self aware- 
ness program, Petrowsky has been giving personal development 
seminars for the past 20 years. 

The cost of the two-day seminar is $225, and seating is limit- 
ed. For more information or to register, call Shainberg at 520- 
1111. 




1 EDITORIAL LaIceIancI NewspApEs StpTf wbt* 10,1 994 , 




If there's any common dehomiriatorto the new wave 
of residential growth in west Lake County, ifs higher 
density being planned by builders and developers that 
increasingly is getting the greenlight from of!lciaI<i6m. 

Of sue projects that have attained public' attention of 
late, the question of how many units are reasonable 
and appropriate for a given land unit is paramount. 
Significantly, opposition typically raises arguments 
based on other points than development itself.' That's a 
new attitude, in our opinion, a i\nevvpoint mat bodes 
well for compromise; 

•%Ttie public seems'to understand that development is 
inevitable. Arguments arise oyer the degree to which 
the land will be impacted. Questions regarding envi- 
ronmental protection, storm drainage, traffic and 
;schopl-impact have become parts of the broader con- 
cern over wbri^ble density.; 
| The density factor is evident in deb 
ment^enyironmentally sensitive land abutting 
Fairfield Marsh adjacent to Round I^e.Heights. 
Unaccephble density is me underlying cause of public 
outrage oyer three projects, including 150 mobile 
homes, ; planned for Wooster Lake, a smaU.recreational 
body of water in Grant Township. > Renewed effort to 
develop the 430 acre Roriey Farm near Wauconda for 
850 homes has rekindled .public debate oyer how many 
homes can be crammed on the given acreage consider- 
ing there are iST^acresJof wetlands on the prpperty. 
Slocum Lake townhouses proprosed in Island Lake are 
mired-deeply in drainage problems; but high density for 
the available buildable land isn't helping. ■•;•' 
; ■ The time has come to recognize density* as a root 
cause for the societal problems associated with over 
development; - Not everyone can afford to live on a five 
acre estate, but then ifs also sensibieto recognize that 
allowing affordable condos oh filled-iri wetlands i isn't 
the answer, either. 

Main street USA 
back in style 

Just as the nation is rediscovering the importance of 
family values (shades of Dan Quayle) , there is a resur- 
gence i of interest in the role a viable main street plays in 
advancing community living. 

Illinois politicians are jumping on the downtown 
bandwagon as fast as they can— if they can find room. 
Lt. Gov. Bob Kustra, campaigning with his boss for re- 
election, says the year-old Illinois Main Street program 
ought to turn its attention to me suburbs now that ithas 
a I3-town toe hold dowristate. Yes it should; 

In short, Illinois Main Street provides technical- assis- 
tance to help communities set up local corporations 
formed to revitalize sagging downtowns; This is^ort of J 
apolitical quick fix. No grants. No aid. Communities 
still are on their own when it comes to funding , ^ 
upgrades of deteriorating infrastructures and rehabbing 

ancieiit buildings. . 

The state could learn a thing or two from Libertyyille, 
which tied into a Washington-based organization long 
enough ago to achieve measurable results. In their own 
fashion, Antibch and Mundelein are engaged in boot- 
strap efforts to revitalize aging downtowns. Grayslake 
trustees are doing their best to interest downtown mer- 
chants in organizing for revitalization, going so far as 
dangling a $35,000 carrot for administrative costs in 
front of them.. ^ ; ; 

Tb many communities, a downtown is an irresistible , 
lure. Buffalo Grove, Vernon Hills and Schaumburg are 
in various stages of campaigns to "manufacture" a 
downtown where one never existed in the first place. 
Other Lake County communities like Gurnee and Lake 
Zurich grew so fast in recent years that crossroads clus- 
ters of business never reached main street status. : Like 
Vernon Hills, the Round Lake area has become a "mall < 
town." It remains to be seen whether this rapidly grow- 
ing sector will get the main street bug in the future; > ■■* 

This newspaper has its share of battle scars to show 
for our unstinting main street support from 'way back. . 
Our adherence to main street values is based on the 
corivjedon that every universe, no matter how small, 

. ne^s;a^enter.;; ■;/■'':;.'; 7\>- ■'':.;■:-> S! -ff0^ip-® 
Jdst like the uriendin^Odyssey of the^rnerican hem- 
lir^^afetreet America has had Itstips and downs. 
^WeWBappy to see downtown baclciri style. 



Vi Ewpoi NT - 

Move over Big Mac, 
supper's on table 



BILL SCHROEDER 



Publisher 

Will wonders never cease! 
McDonald's is going downhome. 
Would you believe mcatlc-af and 
mashed potatoes? 

Big Mac's experimental 
Hearth Express has debuted in 
west suburban Darien to rave 
notices. McDonald executives 
aren't talking, but they're said to 
be thrilled about going toe-to-toe 
with successful home-style cook- 
ing places featuring $4.99 to $5.99 
sit-down meals. 

Look for future Hearth Express 
outlets to spout in Vernon Hills 
and near Gurnee Mills. 
A A A A A A A 

SECRET'S OUT— Environ- 
mentalists have figured out why 
controversial developer Bruno 
Pasqulneili is drawn to wetlands- 
impacted areas like kids to a 
candy store when other builders 
shy away from cattails. 

They say Pasquinclli knows 
that land near protected wetlands 
can be purchased cheaper and 
that the cagey builder has figured 
out how to wend his way through 
the thicket of bureaucracy sur- 
rounding wetlands. 

Pasquinclli, a major Chicago 
developer, personally has been 
dealing with' officials in Round 
Lake Heights, Mundelein and 
Island Lake to gain approval for 
building projects. Complaints 
about potential flooding and 
king-size drainage headaches 
don't faze him. 

■ t t L 1 i 1 

SICK HOUSE— Employees in 
the office of Libcrtyville High 



School arc happy the district's 
"This Old House" adventure Is 
coming to an end soon. 

Early in 1995 the more than 
100-year-old house on W.Park 
Ave. that has been district head- . 
quarters for 14 years will be lev- 
eled to make room for a new 
$352,000 administrative center. 

Supt. Don Gossett liked the 
place, but workers said that mold 
and bacteria collecting in damp 
spots made them sick. Board 
members Richard Friedenberg 
and Donald Ransom said the 
structure, formerly the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Baldwin, 
has become a nuisance. 
Somewhat nettled by the criti- 
cism, the Baldwins indicated that 
school officials probably forgot to 
keep the roof patched. "The 
house was in splendid condition 
when we sold it to the school," 

Mrs. Baldwin declared. 

* ******* 

SONG BIRD— Coroner 

Barbara Richardson, known for 
her knack of putting words to 
songs for just about every occa- 
sion, was up to the task at a 25th 
anniversary luncheon at College 
of Lake County. 

Richardson . adapted Bob 
Hope's theme song, "Thanks for 
the Memory," for a luncheon 
opus she retitled, "Thanks for the 
Memories." Long-time CLC 
.trustee Jim Lumber recounted 
interesting anecdotes about the 
school's formative years, includ- 
ing the somewhat embarrassing 
tale that harried staff members 
(Richardson happened to be one) 
misplaced the application of the 




school's first president,; Dr. 
Richard Erzen. "We found it 
behind a radiator six months 
later," Lumber grinned sheepish- 

A A A A A A A- 

BIRD WATCHING— We stand , 
corrected. A few weeks ago this 
column recounted the 11 endan- 
gered bird species in Fairfield 
Marsh. One of them was pretty 
garbled. It should have been the 
pied billed grebe. Sony. 
"A^A'Ar A A A A 

WAVES ABOARD— Women 
now In boot camp at Great Lakes 
Naval Training Center are not the 
first women to be trained there as 
recruits. Sometime after World 
War II and until 1952, Waves 
trained at Great Lakes, according 
to Helen Anderson. 

Helen ought to know. She was 
one of them. Helen recalled 
undergoing boot camp at Great 
Lakes in 1951. Next year Wave 
recruit training was moved to 
Bainbridge, Md. 

Now retired and living in 
Arkansas, Helen was honored for 
voluntcerism at a, luncheon • 
presided over by Gov. Jim Guy 
Tucker. 

^H^Ar A'A'^Ht 

ONE MAN'S FAMILY— Collie, ,- 
our mild-mannered, kindly 
German shepherd, has taken a 
, dislike to the mild-mannered, , 

kindly gentlemen in brown who 
. deliver packages for UPS. The 
other day our pet pinned the UPS • 
driver to a tree in the backyard. 
Maybe she doesn't like brown 
uniforms. 



LU I I \J I V I f\ I— Newspapers 

-Commentary- :..,:, 

Developer's 'protection' belies responsibility 



Francos B. Sholdon • 

Thank heaven! Finally 
Pasquinclli is proposing a wet- 
lands development so outra- 
geous that Bill Schrocdcr is blow- 
ing the whistle. Keep your whistle 
handy. 

Here on Slocum Lake we've 
been, trying to fend off a 
Pasquinelli/Island Lake cozy col- 
lusion since January, and the only 
progress we can claim is that 
nothing has been built so far. 

The editor is so right about the 
Indifference of village officials to 
environmental issues. Island 
Lake trustees are far more con- 
cerned about getting some land- 
scaping and a $100,000 stoplight 
from Pasquinclli than they are in 
maintaining the integrity of the 
area's drainage resources. 
They're a bit worried about how 
they're going to manage snow- 
plowing in the cramped quarters 
of the proposed Clearwater Oaks 
subdivision, but they actually 
snicker when "bleeding hearts" 
urge retention of wildlife habitat. 



Our wetlands (ADID Wetland 
No. 121) arc neither as extensive 
nor as pristine as Fairfield Marsh, 
but they arc vital to the viability 
of the Slocum Lake drainage 
basin (the most flood-prone of 
the four major drainage basins in 
Lake County). 

It's the lake's northeast, slough 
that Pasquinclli is targeting. He 
wants to put 21 buildings (142) 
families) on the slightly higher 
ground north, east and south of a 
cattail swamp. He's purchased 31 
1/2 acres, 19 of which arc delin- 
eated wetlands. Through multi- 
ple variances, he's managed to 
squeeze out about 18-19 acres of 
"buildable" land. 

All the usual governmental 
entities have Investigated 
Pasquinelli's plans and issued 
reports ranging from cautionary 
to negative to incomplete (no 
biological survey has ever been 
done). The Army Corps, of 
Engineers, however, can override 
anybody else's recommenda- 
tions. The OCE has approved not 



only the building site, but also the 
construction of a big, long, grav- 
el-and-earthcn bcrm .right 
through the peat-bottomed cat- 
tail swamp that comprises the 
heart of the slough. This would 
run parallel to Mylith Park's west- 
ern border and "protect" us from 
flooding. Pasquinclli docs not 
own the swamp; it's still in the 
hands of a private land specula- 
tor. The bcrm is to be maintained 
in perpetuity through the "prop- 
erty owners' association" scam so 
accurately described: 

Island Lake has already flood- 
ed into Mylith Park twice recently 
(April 1993 and February 1994) 
from its new Westridge subdivi- 
sion to our north. This should be 
hard to do during- a dry weather 
cycle. Island Lake achieved it by 
running Wcstridge's storm sew- 
ers under Rte. 176 and then sim- 
ply dumping the water but onto 
the ground to find its own path to 
the slough. About half of it 
detoured via Mylith Park. 
See COMMENTARY page B5 



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StpTtwbf 70,1994 UkcUNd Newspapers COUNTY. 



-Party Unes— — ~~ — 

No-show Republicans hot sending 






Party Lines, the lakeland Newspapers col- 
umn of political commentary, Is prepared 
from staff reports. 

No-show means nothing— Lake 
Zurich Mayor Deborah A. Vasels said 

her no-show at a 
press conference of 
County mayors and 
village presidents 
giving Gov. Jim 
Edgar their support 
should hot be an 
indication of where 
she stands in the ' 
election. - 

Vajol* "Philosophically 

speaking, I have more Republican tenden- 
cies than Democratic tendencies, but I 
tend to look at the way a candidate looks at 
the issues," she said. 

"My non-appearance should not indi- 
cate anything," she said; adding a conflict 
precluded her from making the afternoon''*;' 1 
meeting in Gurnec. . 

"My reason for not appearing had 
nothing to do with supporting Edgar," she 
said. 

Vasels said she has not made a deci- 
sion for either Edgar or Dawn Clark 
Netsch, as neither candidate is perfect. 

Either way, her choice as Mayor of 
Lake Zurich may be different than her 
choice as a resident of Illinois, she said, 

depending on the issues involved. 

• • • 

Eckmann note— As president of the 
Northwest Municipal "Conference, 
Libertyvill e Mayor Jo Ann Eckmann did 
not attend the Guv's pep rally in Gumee. 
Various Republican mayors demonstrated 
their support for : the' Governor Edgar by 

■ o?1vv rr.'v id.r f H'JU'i ■'>'■■: ■■ 



attending the event, but Eckmann said she 
felt it necessary to maintain a non-partisan 
stand as president of the NVVMC. She said 
the conference has sent letters to both 
Edgar and Democrat candidate Dawn 
Clark Netsch on its wish to form a proper- 
ty tax reform task force; 

Other missing members— Other 

Lake County mayors missing for the 

Gubernatorial event 
included: Lenore 
Simmons of Long 
Grove who was out- 
of-town as well as 
Douglas Challos 
of Hawthorn Woods 
who had other com- 
mitments. Teaching 
careers prevented 
Park City Mayor 
Robert Allen and 

Third Lake Mayor Karen McClnskey 

from attending. 

• • • 
Democracts give no 

endorsement— Among the Democratic 

Lake County members including: Former 

Republican Ralph Davis of Round Lake 

Beach , Jim Lumber of Round Lake, 

Bobby Thompson 

of North Chicago 

and BID Durkin of 

Waukcgan, none 

have come forward 

to formally endorse 

Dawn Clark Netsch 

in the governor's 

race. Perhaps there 

is an announcement 

brewing? 




Challos 




Gash 



Dirty tricks— Supporters of State 
Rep. Lauren Beth Gash (D-Highland 

Park) arc charging that her Republican 
opponent, Edna Schade, attempted to 
plant a mole in Gash headquarters. 

According to Gash backers, a young 
man lied about his name, phone. number 
and address In offering to volunteer for the 
first term Democrat. A few days later, Gash 
herself spotted the young man wearing a 
Schade campaign shirt. When confronted, 
the political spy hopeful shrugged, "Well, 

you know how the game is played." 

' •*• • 

Future on line — Open space advo- 
cates In Wauconda say Mayor James 
Eschenbauch is walking a political 

tightrope by back- 
ing not one but two 
controversial build- 
ing projects at the 
same - time. 

Eschenbauch is 
supporting a new 
plan for Roney 
Farms and the 100- 
home project for 
Wauconda 
Orchards. Support Eschenbauch 
among village residents for growth and 

development reportedly is soft 

• • • . 

Glad and sad— Members of the Lake 
County Republican Federation tempered 
their lively annual meeting with a touch of 
sadness noting the death of Ned Fisher, . 
46, a former Federation stalwart. 

The late Waukcgan attorney and GOP 
partisan was a past winner of die coveted 
Bob Milton Award for leadership and ser- 
vice which went this year to State Rep. 
Virginia Flester Frederick (R- Lake 




Frederick 



Forest). 

The, award . to 
Frederick was a 
meeting high point 
State Sen. David 
Barkhausen (R- 
Lake Forest) led 
eulogies to the for- 
mer leader, recalling 
with lump in throat 
the many happy 
times he and' Ned 



shared in rehearsing and performing their 
popular political skits. :< * ' 



• • • 




Waiting* for Bill— Democrats in 

Waukcgan are noting with glee that: BUI 

Stanczakf a state employee, is having a 

hard time getting his campaign off ground 

to unseat County Board Rep. Bertha 

Ogrln, a highly respected. Democrat. Bill 

already has suffered one defeat at the 

hands of Ogrin and was a reluctant starter. 

• ••'■- 
..... ■ ... 

Working with children— County 
Board member Pam Newton finds her- 
self working with children all day long. In 
addition to representing district 18 as a 
County Board mem- 
ber, she is director 
of Christ Lutheran 
Preschool in Vernon 
Hills. She attends 
county committee 
meetings in the 
morning and then 
races back to 
. Vernon Hills to take 
care of preschool 
business. "I work Newton 
. with children all day long. Some arc older 
than others," Newton quipped. 





From page B4 

Apparently in tacit recognition 
of the Westridgc episodes (Island 
Lake has never formally admitted 
culpability), Pasquinclli magnan- 
imously offered to construct yet 
another berm to "protect" us a 
few months ago. This would be a 
one -foot-high earthen mound on 
the 40-foot-widc casement along 
Mylith Park Rd. (our northern 
boundary). A shallow ditch would 
be dug behind it Our own storm 
sewer is already in place in this 
casement; Island Lake is talking 
about using this same easement 
to run its sanitary sewers over to 
Pasquinclli's development and 
beyond. Just how all this would fit 
into the same 40-foot width I 
don't know, but I'm quite sure 
the tall trees and verdant under- 
growth now lining Mylith Park. 
Rd. would no longer be here. 

Island Lake's "final" approval 
of Pasquinclli's latest "final" 
plans seems imminent The plans 
are rumored to contain yet more 
brand new twists, including 
dredging into Slocum Lake. Other 
rumors indicate Pasquinclli may 
also be involved in commercial 
development (gas station? hotel? 
marina? bar?) on the adjacent 
property to the east (corner Rtc. 
176 and Darrcll Rd.). 

Remember the "Year 2000 



LAMCOG Comprehensive Plan" 
published in 1904? That docu- 
ment was so carefully researched 
and sensitively reasoned that it 
was probably doomed to oblivion 
from the very beginning. 
Certainly the current Island Lake 
trustees arc paying no attention 
to it The "Parcel Map" in the 
LAMCOG Plan appendix, recom- 
mended nothing but estate 
development (one- to five-acre 
homesites) on the land north arid 
cast of the slough, and nothing at 
all on the Rte. 176, Darrell Rd. 
corner. Island Lake has zoned the 
entire area for multi-family and 
commercial development 

Pasquinclli had planned to 
start building this spring. There's 
only one reason it hasn't hap- 
pened yet: The incredible effort 
expended by Slocum Lake citi- 
zens determined to avert disaster 
in at least the one small part of 
Lake County we call home. We 
have neither money nor clout So 
we really appreciate putting the 
spotlight on developers in gener- 
al, and PasqUinelli in particular. 

Editor's note: Frances B. 
Sheldon is a longtime resident of 
Mylith Park in unincorporated 
Wauconda fwp. Besides keeping 
abreast of environmental issues, 
Sheldon is an active bird watcher 
and nature lover. 




-Letters WElecxiyiE 



... :. - ■■.--. : ; _- 



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' .- •:■ '■:■. ':■::■ "- - 



Letters to the editor are Welcome; They should 
; c^^h v toplcs of General' Interest; .approximately 

contain "d: home address and telephone 
number. Jt)e;edltor reserves the right to 
r^Sondehse all letters ;, 



-Letters to 

Building case for Gash 

Editor. 

I want to sec elected officials work hard, get 
tilings done, and not be consumed about how it 
makes their political party or the other party look. 
For this reason, I have been thrilled with State Rep. 
Lauren Beth Gash. She has fought for things we care 
about such as education reform, economic develop- 
ment, crime prevention, changes at the Illinois Toll 
Highway Authority, child rights and reproductive 
choice. 

The most important quality about Lauren Beth 
Gash is that she will work with people from both 
parties to get things done. She has sponsored bills 
that were supported by leaders of both parties at 
various times and signed into law by the governor, 
and she has voted against bills that had the support 
of both parties, such as the budget, because it was a 
political sham and everyone knew it 

The next day, major newspapers editorialized 
that the budget was going to fall apart after the 
November election and it was passed simply to end 
the session. Lauren Beth Gash is a refreshing 
change, and many other elected officials could learn 
a lot from her. 

Robin Cosco 
Lincolnshire 

District fulfilling mission 

Editor. 

In your Sept. 9 edition, Tom Vaughn wrote about 
the Forest Preserve Dist's interest in participating in 
a public/private partnership effort which would 
establish a golf learning center on district land. Mr. 
Vaughn asks, "Docsn'tthis bother anyone that these 
people arc going to bulldoze a forest preserve?" He 
interprets this project as meaning "that the pro- 
development forces . . . have now found a way to 
develop a forest preserve." 

With all due respect, I would suggest that Mr. 
Vaughn is ill-advised. State statutes charged forest 
preserve districts with multiple responsibilities; 
preservation, education, restoration and recreation 
arc the four main ones, in addition to flood control 
and others. Furthermore, the property in Beach Park 
which the district owns was purchased for specific 



EdiTOR 



and publicly announced purpose of building a golf 
course on it 

We provide trails for horse riding, snowmobiling, 
cross-country skiing and hiking. We also make avail- 
able fishing and boat facilities and an area specifi- 
cally set aside for people to walk and train dogs. We 
provide a boat launch and trailer sites at our camp- 
grounds at the Fox River Preserve. We provide edu- 
cation opportunities at the Ryersoh Conservation 
Area, the Lake County Museum and other forest 
preserves. Most importantly, we provide thousands 
of acres of prairies, savannas, forests, lakes and wet- 
lands, far and away most of the district's land is for 
passive enjoyment, wildlife preservation and the 
general environmental good. 

The proposed private/ public partnership with 
Michael Jordan Golf Company is intended to build a 
golf center at Buffalo Creek Forest Preserve near 
Buffalo Grove upon land that is now farmed. It will 
not disturb any natural areas. 

1 hope this information clears up any misunder- 
standings Mr. Vaughn may have had. 

Colin L McRae, President 
Lake County Forest Preserve 

Developers use old trick 

Editor. 

Thank you for covering the Wauconda scene so 
thoroughly with regard to the proposed comprehen- 
sive development plan and also the re-submission 
of the Roney Farms development plans. 

The new plan calls for 850 homes. Now if the 
developers would just take over all education costs 
of the new residents, which they will never consider, 
perhaps we could learn to live with the extra 1,700 
plus cars in the vicinity (at two cars per family, that 
seems like a fair estimate.) 

It's an old trick— keep coming back with the laws 
needed by a certain group— and the folks at home 
will grow wearing opposing. Well, we certainly do 
grow tired, but we don't forget. 

Please speak up for the type of village you want to 
live in and pass on to your children. 

Janet R. Leach 
Wauconda 




COUNTY La^IancI Nwsp'ApEiisJ £$Hib r ti tO,1994 






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J. 
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Sheriff Grinnell to address Lake County needs 



TINA I. SWIECH 

Staff Reporter 

Lake County Sheriff Clint 
Grinnell is attempting to do it 
again by giving it a go in the 
November elections. 

The six- 
year sheriff, 
and life- 
long Libcr- 
tyvilte resi- 
dent cx- 
plained 
some of his 
concerns 
and what 
can be done. 
Clint Grinnell Regarding 

gun control, Grinnell said this is def- 
initely an issue of concern. "There's 
no question the guns available on 
the streets arc not really required for 
sport," said the sheriff. H is answer is 
"aggressive enforcement of the cur- 
rent (gun) laws." 

The influx of gangs, which seem 
to be the concern of nearly every 
neighborhood in the county, is also 
one of interest for Grinnell. 

"There's no question that 
gangs arc here/' said Grinnell 
who explained there arc true 
gang-bangers and then there arc 




wanna-bc gang members. 

"We play a major rote (in this 
issue)," said Grinnell of the Lake 
County Gang Task Force. 

The task force worked well to 
deter and arrest gang members 
when situated at such events as 
the Lake County Fair and 
Mundclcin Days over the sum- 
mer, said the incumbent. 

A network made up of law 
enforcement agencies called 
"GRIP" Is another way the sheriff 
said he is fighting gangs. GRIP 
which stands for Gang Reduction 
Intelligence Program has been 
united by the Lake County 
Sheriffs Department. Grinnell 
calls it an "efficient" program. 

Grinnell is "frustrated" over 
the overcrowding of the county 
jail. "It's a concern for law 
enforcement and it has been for a 
long time," said Grinnell," but at 
the same, we don't have the 
resources (currently)." 

Whether or not he will partic- 
ipate in a public debate with 
Democratic opponent Richard 
Jablonski, is yet to be known. 
Grinnell said his campaign com- 
mittee is working on it. Grinnell 
asked "What benefit (will it be)?" 





Chief Justice John Goshgartan of the 19th Judicial Circuit Court, Jokes with Lake County Sheriff Cint Grhnell 
during a political reception party on Friday at the Country Squire In Graystako.— Photo by Todd F. Heteier 

Jablonski: no compromise on crime 



Auction helper Lee Neuroth holds up a painting to be auctioned at 
the reception sponsored by the Committee to Reelect Clint Grinnell 
for Sheriff. The painting was donated by Kay Bowman of the Saffoid 
Western Art Gallery In Wauconda— Photo by Todd F. Hotter 



TINA L. SWIECH __ 

Staff Reporter 

Richard Jablonski, Demo- 
cratic candidate for Lake County 
Sheriff, is taking "No compro- 
mise on crime" as his motto for 
the 1994 campaign, and is plan- 
ning to stomp out violence. 

The Gurncc resident who is 
known as not a politician, but "a 
professional law enforcement 
officer," held a news conference 
giving straightforward narration 
of his crime prevention plan if he 
is elected sheriff. 

Jablonski, maintaining a posi- 
tive attitude about wearing a new 
title after Nov. 8, said the differ- 
ence between himself and cur- 
rent Sheriff Clint Grinnell, is not 
necessarily their parties. While 
Grinnell is a Republican, and 
Jablonski a Democrat, there is an 
assemblage of what are called 
"Republicans for Jablonski" out 
of Round Lake Beach and sur- 
rounding communities. 

The prospecting changes that 
Jablonksi plans include cutting 
wasteful spending. The candi- 
date claims per the Pcrins 



Management Report which stud- 
ied the County sheriffs depart- 
ment, frivolous spending has 
been running amuck since 
Grinnell took over nearly six years 
ago. 

Jablonski said he is "taking a 
hard line approach" to the issue 
of. crime prevention for Lake 
County. Some of the highlights 
include expanding the current 
gang crime/drug task force and 
make it into a pro-active crime- 
fighting unit to counter the grow- 
ing number of gang crimes and 
drug trafficking in the county. 

The candidate explained the. 
anti-gang initiative is based on 
Jablonski 's hard-line philosophy 
of "Zero Tolerance for Gangs," 
which includes enforcing a mili- 
tary-style "boot camp" for juve- 
niles convicted of carrying 
weapons, selling drugs, or com- 
mitting a felony. 

The candidates' outline 
describes him as a true life "Top 
Cop" who has waged the war on 
heavy-duty inter-city crime for a 
total of 33-ycars. 

Jablonski's resume begins 




when he 
started as 
a Chicago 
Police Of- 
ficcrinlSWl. 
In three 
years he 
was ap- 
pointed as 
Vice De- 
tective and ' 
then [n Richard Jabtohskf 

1966 he was given the title of 
Violent Crime Detective at the 
Chicago Police Department. 

In 1977 he was promoted to 
sergeant and then went on to he 
the chief of the Lindenhurst 
Police Department .where he 
reports reducing the crime rate 
for three consecutive years and 
developing a community orient- 
ed police department. 

Jablonski also served as chief 
of Round Lake Beach in a depart- 
ment of 30 sworn officers in a 
town with the population of 
20,000. 

There he also worked to 
develop a community oriented 
police department. 



PALL CAR CARE 



FALL CAR CARE 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



When should cars be washed? 



V 
l 



We usually think of washing the car 
only In the fall and winter to prevent 
corrosion caused by winter salt, but did 
you know that Immediately after a rain- 
fall is one of the most critical times to 
wash your car? That's right even the 
lightest shower could cause Irreparable 
acid rain damage to your vehicle's 
beautiful finish, If not quickly cleaned at 
a professional car wash. 

"Acid rain damage is caused when 
high concentrations of emissions from 
fossll-fuel-bumlng engines or plants 
react wtth your car!s paint to form sulfu- 
ric and nitric acids," says Dan Palenske, 
president of the Internationa! Carwash 
Association (ICA). 

v He adds, 'The result of this process Is 
the penetration and etching of clear- 
coat finishes, whose protective qualities 
will then eventually corrode, exposing 



the paint to many harmful, corrosive 
elements. 

A car wtth bad acid rain damage 
could be devalued by up to $1,000 at 
trade-in or resale time." 

Although you can't prevent acid 
rain, you can keep It from ruining your 
car's finish by removing It as soon as 
possible at a professional car wash, 
advises Palenske. 

This Is why It's Important to visit a pro- 
fessional car wash frequently, and 
especially after a rainfall. Keeping your 
car's finish In the best possible condition 
is of vital Importance In maintaining 
and preserving the overall appearance 
and value of the car. 

A broken engine part— even the 
entire engine— can be replaced, but 
once the body Is destroyed, the car Is 
worthless. 




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Sidti* b« 10, 1 994. LaI<eI anc! . Newspapers IAK£ LIFE 





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MARY FOLEY 



,. Staff Reporter — ~" 

Theater-goers will love Bowen Park theater Company's presentation of 
'Sleuth.'. The play, by Anthony Shaffer, Is a bit of comedy, mystery, and psy- 
chology packed into a well-produced) tight performance. 

'Sleuth,' the opening production' of the ninth season of Bowcn Park 

Theater Company,; is also the directorial debut of Paul Carlin. Carlin, wliosc 

■ extensive resume includes television and off-Broadway work, as well as 

regional and stock theater, is a contender for the position of artistic director of 

the company. ' 

If 'Sleuth' was just a sample of Carlln's work, Bowen Park may have already 
found their man. 

Patrick Kerr Is just wonderful as Andrew Wykc, a narcissistic game-player 

who finally meets his match. Kerr, an Antioch resident, does an awesome job 

; as the past-his-prime mystery writer who is losing his wife to a younger man. 

Fred Schcnck, playing MUo Tindle, Wyke's wife's love interest, docs a fine 
job throughout the twists and rums of this fascinating play. Schenck's perfor- 
mance in the second act can only be described as masterful. 

The play is set In Wyke's country home. With the attention to detail by Jim 
Neal, set designer, the audience almost feels a part of the room. Nothing 
seemed to be overlooked, right down to the goldfish. 

Performances. of 'Sleuth' will be presented at Goodfcllow Hall in Bowcn 
Park from Sept. 16 through Oct. 8. Call 360-4741 for more Information regard- 
ing times and tickets. . 




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Newspapers 



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- 



RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 
Editor In Chief 

: While most Lake Cpuntians 
are falling back on an extra hour 
of sleep Sunday morning, the 
Dcnman family will be racing 
through the Lake County Forest 
Preserve to raise awareness and 
funds to Tight against the number 
one disabling disease' of young 
adults — Multiple Sclerosis. 
. .^.For theJDenmans, the fight is 
personal It is also a mission that 
has brought the Grayslakc family 
, closer together., 




to raise MS ivarenfess 




Kelly Connolly 



:.:.-.'. ci;': : .ii: ;-V;.- I...::: ■' '''/i.'.ti,",'';.!.'.' 

When the family races on 
Sunday, walking beside them will 
be Kelly Connolly of Buffalo 
Grove, an active participant in 
the Tight against MS. Connolly 
has been instrumental in the suc- 
cess of the Lake County "Bike 
n'Hikc for Darlene" through her 
volunteer efforts. Her sistcr-in- . 
. law, Dawn Denman, was diag- 
nosed with the disease nearly five 
years ago..' 

"Dawn has a mild case of 
MS," said Randy Denman, her 
husband and Kelly's brother. 
"We have been fortunate. Her 
symptoms have not increased 
greatly since her diagnosis. As a 
family, the impact on our house- 
hold has not been too bad. We 
haven't had to change a lot of 
things — we try to be as normal as 
possible. The disease has made 
us closer." 

Kelly won't be the only sib- 
ling walking for MS. Other family 
members including Dawn's sis- 
ters and their families as well as 
the Dcnman's two sons, Danny, 
9, and Patrick, 7. All have been 
active volunteers working with 
the MS society on various fund 



raising events. 

The core group of family 
members helping out has includ- 
ed Dawn's sister, Barb Bacsa, and 
her daughter, Kristcn Bacsa , as 
well as her sister, Laurie Cwercnz 
,"• "and ' her husband, James 
Cwerenz. Even, Dawn's twin, 
Donna. Gardino, who currently. 
resides in Alaska, has participat- 
ed in a study and other activities 
for the MS society. 

"We really got involved with 
the MS Society right* after Dawn 
was diagnosed," said Randy. "It 
has been one of the ways to learn 
to cope." 

Learning to cope and raising 
awareness have become one 
focus for- the family. The 
Dcnman's sons have also walked 
in fund-raising events. Last year, 
Danny participated in the MS 
Society Read-a-thon. "He raised 
$100 through his efforts," said 
Randy. "We try to get the kids 
involved in the effort and they are 
a lot of help around the house 
doing chores such as bringing 
down their laundry and other 
jobs that, minimize Dawn's need 
to climb steps and things." 



Buffalo Grove resident Kelly, 
a nurse at Lutheran General 
Hospital in Park Ridge, got 
involved with the MS Society at 
Randy's request. 

'it's important to give her 
• support and to show her that we 
care," said Kelly. "This is a dis- 
ease that affects a lot of people 
and especially a lot of young peo- 
ple. When it happens to some- 
one in your family it hits you 
hard. You're not invincible." 

Kelly has served as the med- 
ical assistant during fund raising 
events and has also worked to 
recruit- volunteers and in other 
capacities. 

"Participating in the fund 
raiser is a great day," Kelly said. 
"When you're finished you'll feel 
like you've done something 
good." 

Kelly says her brother has 
worked hard to promote aware- 
ness and fund raising efforts to 
fight MS. 

"I use Dawn as an example a 
lot," said Randy. "She doesn't 
want to slow down. She docs the 
best she can with it. MS doesn't 
affect each person that same way. 



It can get worse and it can not. 
Some people have a severe case 
of the disease when they arc diag- 
nosed." 

According; to Randy, Dawn 
has a mild case of the disease. 
For many MS victims the disease 
will have progressed to a more 
severe level by the time they . arc 
diagnosed. 

"This is a disease that can be 
controlled through exercise, diet 
and physical therapy," said 
Randy. "If you think you have the 
symptoms of the disease, sec a 
doctor and follow his advice. 
Learn about it and read about it 
Every case is different." 

For the Dcnman's, life con- 
tinues to be a flurry of work, soc- 
cer practices and all the other 
day-to-day tasks. Randy com- 
mutes to Chicago each day as a 
branch manager for LaSalle- 
Talmann Bank. Dawn works part- 
time as an administrative assis- 
tant and purchaser at Success 
National Bank in Lincolnshire, 
where employees and co-workers 
have been supportive and help- 
ful. 

"We haven't run into a shell 
with this disease," said Randy. "1 
haven't held back. We let our 
friends and co-workers know and 
we try to get them involved in. 
fighting the disease." 



,«5i l/A' > 



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21st annual Bike 'n Hike for Darlene at 11 routes, Su 



or rollerbladihg. Participants in the 21st annual Bike 'n 
Hike for Darlene on Sunday, 5 Oct. 2, may choose their 
own "style t forcompletihg the event wnich will take 
place at 11 community route locations. 
; ;SporisoredIb*^e£iiicagp Greater Illinois. Chapter 
of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society; the event 
has a goal of oyer i $250,o6o in proceeds for the benefit 
fof MS research and local client services programs) ' 

Comedian Tom Dreescn isjibhorary chairperson of 
the event; Dreesen's service I with the chapter began 
oyer decade ago ? when he developed the MS uD^ 
D^ene* pr^rar^lii Honor of hif sister; ^ejate|# 
'DarieneBeu^fcwho had MS: . ' ;, 

"Day for Qaijene? and Bike Vn Hike volunteers have 
joined forces*tfds*year to present "Bike 'n Hike Xpt0i : 
Darlene" as a unified major event. Activities of the day; 
wiiliiiclu^eielchrity appearances by sporte figures ;; 
ariti Hoilywoohf^cnds bfDrocseh; < u * r T <v:<^ i 

•HouseHbid'Flnance Corp. is the presenting sponsor 
of the^ventwjth prizes and products furnished by % '*(* 




Oct. 2 



American Airlines^ Lettuce Entertain You, Salerno, Coca- 
Cola and Hinckley & Schmitt as well as many businesses 
in the areas of eadi loute; WMAQ-TV and FM 100 have 
joined the chapter's team to provide promotional assis- 
tance for the event Mark Supelsa, anchorman at WMAQ- 

v TV, will emcee the lakefront route opening ceremonies. 
Additional promotional support have been provided by 
trteASubuihanUfc 

"Lakeland Publishers," -the '"Soitotown'^noiiiist^and 
me "Elk Grove Times." . 

Bike 'n Hike for Darlene registration will be held 
from 8:30 to > 9:30 am., with the official start at 9 a.m. 
Route len^hsyary from 10 to 34 miles and include the 
Chicago Laken^nt (beginning at Montrose Harbor); 

jJDuI%c^JoBetrJ^e^d^ It 

Preserve in Ltaroliisrii^ 
' Dlvlsion/Nonh Branch, Oak Forest and Elk Grove 

Village. Nbw routes tl^ year include Crystal Lake, 
\ Wayne, Laferariigeand Naperville. ;: > v; 

The Bike %Hike for Darierie.is a pledge event, with or 

participants icc^ec^|;:dollars for MS from sponsors. In « 



U.*' 



addition to enjoying the event itself, participants may 
qualify for prizes awarded at various fund-raising levels. 
The grand prize is a trip for two to Boston. All participants 
who turn in $30 or more on the day of the event will . 

receive a souvenir Bike 'n Hike for Darlene T-shirt * 

The. National Multiple Sclerosis Society, founded in 
1946, is the only national voluntary health organization ;> 
in the U.S. devoted solely to supporting research on 
multiple sclerosis as well as supplying services to pco- 
pie with MS and their families through its network of , r , 
144 chapters and branches. ^ V 

Muldplesclerosis is me number one disahling dis- 
ease of youngaduits.' Every hour, ah adiutbetweon the'^ 
aces of 20 and 50 learns that he or she has MS. In MS, ; : 
f the protective coating that surrounds the nerve fibers $$=; 
in' me central nervous system is damaged which leads :' 
'.;M'^ : lnterniptipn\ih/apd.a 'distortion of nerve mes- " 
sages. Early symptoms may include tingling sensa : ' • "; 
tions, muscle weakness^slurred speech and poor c'oor-1 • ; 
duration; v ■ ■ - ' i'^!?^:;*;"^' f$K*%j$fy :f^W'M'r'".^ : -' ; ' 
- For more information, 1-800^922-0484 Hdo 






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1 LAKELIFE LftkcUNd Newspapers Stpumbm 90,1994 



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Hansel and Gretel opens Oct. 7 at CLC 




Aladdin, Olympian Jalmmo Eggloton, Introduces Princess 
Jasmine, portrayed by figure skating champion Cynthia Coull, to 
a whole new world In "Walt Disney's World On Ice— Aladdin." 



The College of Lake County's 
children's production, "Hansel 
and Gretel" by Moses Goldberg, 
will open at 10 am. Oct 7 at the 
CLC auditorium, 19351 W. 



Washington St, Grayslake. The 
play will be repeated at 1 p.m., 
Oct. 7, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Oct 8 
and 2 p.m., Oct. 9. The play will 



I 



Into ThE NiqhT 

Friday 

TheTurnstyles, pop rock, at Slice of Chicago, 36 S. Northwest 
Hwy„ Palatine, 991-2150 . , . Howard & the White Boys, Blue 
Collar Blues, at Cabana Beach Club, 1550 N. Rand Rd., Palatine, 
776-9850 . . . A rock tribute to Rush with Animation and a tribute 
to Emerson Lake & Palmer with Tarkus at Shades, 21860 N. 
Milwaukee Ave., Deerfield, 634-BLUE . . . Sundance Saloon will 
feature Sliver Spar, Routes 176 and 83 in Mundelein, 949-0858. 

Saturday 

Giant/Warner Recording Artists Certain Distant Sans will be 
performing with Stranger Things and Eternalnx in an all ages 
show at the Metro, 3730 N. Clark, Chicago, (312) 549-0203 . . . 
Redeye Express will appear at Beacon Tap, 1374 Lee St, Des 
Plaincs, 296-2335 . . . Delusory, red hot blues, at Cabana Beach 
Club . . Silver Spar at Sundance Saloon..— by CLAUDIA M. 
LENART 



O'Hare Airport Parking Update 

by JIM WARNKEN, 

PRESIDENT, NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

The best advice for parking at O'Hare is-don't. ■ 

Limos are great alternative, friends are even better. But if you're like me 
and have used up your favors due from friends (and are too cheap to spend 
50 bucks for a limo) parking at O'Hare may be your only choice. 

At '18 per day, parking at the main terminal isn't even an option for me. 
The so called 'remote 1 lots E and F are the only economical choices, and 
with the new Airport Transit System, "ATS" (a mini 'L'-Tram) linking the 
remote lots to the terminal, you no longer have to take that long shuttle-bus 
ride. You may still have to take a short bus ride to the ATS station, 
depending on where or in which lot you park. 

The ATS station is located in lot E, where, if you get a space near enough, 
you can walk to it. Otherwise there are buses circulating the lot. If you park 
in lot F, you'll have no choice but to take the shuttle-bus back to the ATS 
station in lot E. There is a tradeoff though. Lot E will cost you *9 per day 
while lot F is only '6. 

To get to lot E, look to your right, just past the Mannheim Road exits upon 
entering the airport and you'll see signs for remote parking. Lot E is past the 
car rental lots, again on your right If ifs full, or if you want to save '3 per day, 
continue the same direction and you'll cross Mannheim and come to Lot F. 

While the ATS trains and the shuttle-buses run quite regularly, allow 
yourself plenty of time. Figure up to 45 minutes from Lot F and 30 minutes 
from tot E to get to your gate. Add this to the time you want to be at the gate 
before your flight 

An alternative to O'Hare's lots are the many private lots along Mannheim, 
such as Pride, which charges only *5 per day for valet parking and includes 
pick-up and drop off the terminal. Exit Mannheim South and they're at the 
5th stoplight on your right, two blocks south of Irving Park. 

Awmrsmemn& ma 



2234 E. Grand Lindenhurst, I 
24 Hr. Recorded Bargains - 356-2000 

(708) 356-301 



* 



also be performed at 2 p.m., Oct. 
16 at Lake Zurich High School. 

In Commedia dell' Arte and 
Oriental theater styles, a group of 
actors will present a charming 
new adaptation to this famous 
fairy tale of the two children, a 
wicked witch and the famous 
Gingerbread house. The play is 
directed by Robert J. Coscarclll, a 
theatre instructor at CLC. 

Tickets are $7 general admis- 
sion and $5 for children, CLC stu- 
dents and alumni. 
Oz set to music . 

the Papal Players will present 
a one-hour musical fantasy for 
children , "The Wizard of Oz," at 
Cutting Hall in Palatine, 150 East 
Wood, beginning Oct 1. 

Performances arc scheduled 
for Oct 1 at 10 a.m.; Oct 6 at 10 
a.m. and Oct 10 at 10:30 and 
12:30 a.m. Ticket price is $5. For 
more information call 359-9556. 

Aladdin on lea returns 

Walt Disney's World on Ice- 
Aladdin returns to be the first 
family entertainment event at the 
new United Center, 1901 West 
Madison, Chicago. The $8 mil- 
lion theatrical skating spectacle, 
which played to sold-out audi- 
ences earlier this year at the 
Rosemont Horizon and Chicago 
Stadium, is the first Walt Disney 
World on Ice production to play a 
same-year encore engagement in 
Chicago. 

Tickets for Walt Disney's 
World on Ice— Aladdin are on 
sale at the United Center box 
office and all Tickemaster outlets. 
For tickets call (312) 559-1212. 




'Annie' a family event 



RHONDA HETBICK BURKE 
Editor In Chief 

Antioch's PM & L Theatre's 
"Annie" Is a warm, touching fam- 
ily drama. 

The cast is well rehearsed 
with Annie understudy Colleen 
Badtke even able to coach a 
reluctant "Sandy, " the dog, back 
to the stage during her first stage 
appearance of trie performance. 

The Sunday matinee perfor- 
mance was the first for under- 
study Badtke, who will also lead 
the cast on Sept 30 and Oct. 9. If 
Badtke is the understudy than 
lead Michelle Mann must truly 
be a delight to watch as Badtke 
did not miss a beat playing oppo- 
site her father, Mark Badtke, in 
the performance. 

If there is any draw back to 
the performance it may be a lack 



of volume on the part of the 
orphans during some musical 
numbers and the fact that com- 
poser Charles Strouse enjoyed 
writing tunes that the actors 
must cany an upper octave range 
to reach. ^nlJv- T • * • ' 

Music teacher Cathy Miller is 
a scene stealer as the orphan 
matron Aggie Hanagan. Jerod 
Howard is delightfully wicked as 
Rooster and Regina Reynolds will 
make you chuckle In her role as 
Lily. 

"Annie" will be presented 
Oct 1, 2, 7, 8 and 9. Curtain time 
is 8 p.m. for Friday and Saturday 
evening performances and 2:30 
p.m. for the Sunday matinee. 
Advanced reservations can be 
made by calling 395-3055 
Monday to Thursday, 5:30 to 7:30 
p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m 








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ChOOM 

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DQumea Press. 
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A*?r\m: ■3i!i«ff|s2 wwj&wyi \**\ut\ hhuivhu 

SiprtMbtft 10, 1994 LaIceM Newspapers LAKELIFE 






F. Y. I . 





'Sleuth* 

Bowen Park Theatre 
Company presents the smash 
hit thriller "Sleuth" at 
Gobdfcllow Hall, Waukegan. 
Remaining play dates are Sept 
30, Oct 1, 2, 6, 7 and 8. Show 
times are 8 p.m., except Tor the 
3 p.m. matinee on Oct 2 and 
7:30 p.m. show time on Oct 6. 
Call 360-4741 for tickets and 
details. 



'Annie' 

PMStL Theatre opens Its 34th sea- 
son with the Broadway hit "Annie" on 
the new stage and expanded theater 
building at 877 Main St, Antloch. 
Production dates are Sept 30, Oct 1, 
2, 7, 8 and 9. Curtain time is 8 p.m. for 
Friday and Saturday dates and 2:30 
p.m. on Sundays. Advance reserva- 
tions are $9 for adults, $7 for students 
and senior citizens. At door prices are 
$8 and $6, subject to availability on 
show dates. Reservations can be 
made by calling 395-3055 Monday to 
Thursday, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Saturday 
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 90 minutes 
before showtime. 

'La Cage Aux Foil es' 

Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre 
presents "La Cage Aux Folles" 
through Oct 30. It Is "everything 
you've always wanted In a musical — 
but nothing you'd expect" Perfor- 
mance schedule Is Wednesdays at 2 
and 8 p.m.; Thursdays and Fridays at 
8 p.m.; Saturdays at 5:30 and 9 p.m.; 
and Sundays at 2:30 and 7 p.m. 
Tickets to all performances are 
$32.50. Dinner packages are avail- 
able. Call 634-0200 for ticket informa- 
tion. 

Incorruptible' 

"Incorruptible," a play by 
Michael Hollinger, will be presented 
: by Stage Two Theater, 12 N. Sheridan 
Rd., Waukegan through Oct 9. 
"Incorruptible" is a play about a 
stormy and hilarious depiction of the 
medieval Catholic Church. Tickets 
are $10, $8 for students, seniors and 
military personnel. Call 662-7088. 

'Anna Karenlna' 

Apple Tree Theatre, 595 Elm PI., 
Highland Park, presents the Midwest 



premiere of the newly revised "Anna 
Karenlna," which Is scheduled to run 
through Oct 30. It Is a tragic portrait 
of the moral and psychological dilem- 
mas of life In czarist Russia. This 
musical event brings all of the passion 
and Irony of the classic love story 
vividly to life. Tickets arc $22 and $24. 
For ticket information call 432-4335. ' 




Dr. Mortimer (Jon Lynn, Mundeleln) 
and the. matron (Karon Potorsoa 
Mundeleln) have a small disagree- 
ment In "It Runs In the Family." 

'In the Family 

"It Runs in the Family" wilt be 
performed by the Kirk Players on Sept 
30 and Oct 1 in the Mundeleln High 
School auditorium. Individual tickets 
can be purchased at the door for $6 
for adults, $3 for seniors and children 
under 12. For more Information call 
566-6594. 





Singers needed 

Female singers are wanted 
for a major fall performance. 
Chorus rehearsals are held at 
Faith Lutheran Church, Rte. 
41 and Deerpath Rd., Lake 
Forest from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
on Monday nights. Call 680- 
1116 or 234-0703 and leave a 
message. 



Season begins 

On Sept 30 and Oct 1 the 
Lake Forest Symphony will open the 
1994-95 classical season with a cele- 
bration of works by Peter Ilylch 
Tchaikovsky featuring pianist Fabio 
Bid in L Under the direction of Maestro 
Paul Anthony McRae, the symphony 
will begin the season with a perfor- 
mance of the "Festival Coronation 



M Wflte 





Your Favorite High School Tuns Hit Hie Airwaves oo 

J 3 Cable 

of Lake County 

Antioch at Lake Forest 

October 4 - 8 p.m.; October 6 - 8 p.m. 
October 8- 10 a.m. 



on 



Channel 3 



March." All concerts begin at 8 p.m. 
and are held at Rhoadcs Auditorium, 
Finch Univ. of Health Sciences/ 
Chicago Medical School, 3333 Green 
Bay, North Chicago. Single tickets arc 
available for $26 or $20. For ticket 
Information call 295-2135. 

Piano dedication 

Barrlngton's Lyric and Children's 
Choir voices, Suzuki strings, and 
additional glorious sounds from 
piano, cello and trombone will fill the 
air on Sunday, Oct 9 In the 
Barrlngton Area Library's meeting 
room during the dedication of the 
library's Kawal grand piano. 

The piano was donated by North 
Barrlngton's Wanda and Jim 
Hollehstelner, long time Barrlngton 
Lyric members. 



The dedication program will 
begin at 2 p.m. witii piano selections 
by Barbara Crooks Endcrs of 
Wauconda. 

Other performers will Include 
soprano Laurel Gibson, Crystal Lake; 
flue solo by Diane Horban accompa- 
nied by Walter Horban; 17-year-old 
cellist Anl Aznavoorian, Barrlngton, 
accompanied by Enders; trombone 
solo by Bob Plagcmann. 

A stringed quartet of students 
from, the Suzuki School under the 
direction of Mary Neal McCammon, 
Barrlngton; and the Barrlngton 
Children's Choir director by Peggy 
Crawford, Barrlngton, and accompa- 
nied by Nancy Kozel, Barrlngton. 

For further Information call 382- 
1300.CXL22, 

See FYI page B10 




Anl Aznavoorian 




It & Reap 



n 



YOU may be chosen as the recipient of 
(50, compliments of Lakeland Newspapers. 
Each week, we will be publishing the i.d. 
numbers of two readers Lakeland 

Newspapers. If your reader id. number 
appears, you have until Wednesday of the fol- 
lowing week to call lakeland Newspapers and 
claim your prize. (Winners will have two 
weeks after the contact date to pick up their 
prize.) Current subscribers may find their 
id. number on the mailing label affixed to 
the front page of the paper, like this.... 




f IIS Willi 

WIHHERS Hi 



Reader 

ID. 

Number 



ST0271 

Charles Stewart 

Grayslake 

AN2307 

Agnes Andracki 

Waukegan 



To subscribe and become eligible for this long-running contest, call the Lakeland Newspaper 
circulation department at 223-8161. 

Contest Rules: 1, Two winners are picked randomly from 13 of the Lakeland Newspapers through a random computer 
search 2 Winners will be notified by reader Identification numbers in the newspaper each week. 3. To claim prize, winners 
must contact Lakeland Newspapers* Circulation Department by the following Wednesday of publication, 12:00 noon, and 
schedule pick-up of prize. 4. Winners must show proof of identification at the Lakeland Newspapers front office to claim prize. 
5 Winners must pick up prize within 2 weeks of notification. 6. Subscription must be paid in full to be eligible to claim prize. 
7. All winners must agree to have their names and pictures to be used for promotional purposes. 8. Contest will begin January 
21 1994, and will end December 30, 1994. 9. Contest is void where prohibited by law. 10. Employees ot Lakeland 
Newspapers and their relatives are not eligible to win prizes. 11. Decisions of Judges are final. 12. This contest is not designed 
to be a tottery system. Unclaimed prizes will not be re-assigned. 




LAKELIFE UkdANd Newspapers SepTeMbe* 70,1994 



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From page B9 

Los Lobos concert 

Los Lobos will perform on 
Saturday, OcL 1 at 8 p.m. at 
Hemmcns Auditorium, 150 Dexter CL 
In Elgin on the Pox River. Tickets are 
S25 and $23 for main floor, and $20 
and $18 for balcony. For reservations 
call 931-5900. 

Dichter to perform 

Mlsha Dichter, one of the world's 
leading pianists, will begin Lake 
County Community Concert Assn/s 
41st season on Oct. 1 at 8 p.m. in 
Waukcgan High School auditorium, 
2325 Brookslde. Price for the cnUrc 
scries of five concerts is $30 per adult 
and $15 per student high school age 
or younger. For ticket information 
call 623-3178. 

Italian musical event 

The Orchestra Sinfonica Haydn 
dl Bolzano c Trcnto continues Its first 
American tour with a concert on 
Tuesday, Oct 4 at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Pick-Staiger concert hall at 
Northwestern's Evanston Campus, 
1977 S. Campus Rd. Tickets are $25, 



$20 and $15 and can be purchased 
through all TtckctMastcr outlets. The 
special Italian musical event Is hosted 
by the instltuto Italians dl Cultura 
and features prominent conductor 
Barry Faldncr and celebrated 
Ukrainian pianist Anna Kravtchcnko. 
For further information call 324-2626. 



LU 



■ ■ 



Irish dancers 

McNulty Irish Dancers is 
holding registration for pre- 
schoolers through adults for 
the fall term. For locations 
and Information call 698- 
4434. 



classes begin OcL 3. For further infor- 
mation call 623-6422. 

'Harvest Hoedown' 

An old time barn dance the 
"Harvest Hoedown" will be held at 
7:30 p.m. Saturday, OcL 8 at the Park 
District Building, 42 S. Seymour in 
Graysiakc, All age groups, with or 
without partners or square dancing 
experience arc invited to attend the 
barn dance. Free dance lessons will 
be offered at 7 p.m. Admission is $3 
per person. 



Buoys and Belles 

Country Western Night 
with Bob Wilson calling 
squares and Liz teaching and 
cueing Country Western lines will be 
sponsored by Buoys and Belles 
Square Dance Club. Dancing begins 
Friday, Sept 30 from 8:30 to 11 p.m., 
with a plus tip at 11 p.m. Country 
Western lines teach and dance from 8 
to 8:30 a.m. and between tips. The 
dance will be held at First United 
Methodist Church, 128 N. Utlca SL, 
Waukegan. Beginner square dance 



: ■ :. 






Fright Fest comes to Great America 



Fright Fest opens to the pub- 
lic on Saturday, Oct. 8 at Six Flags 
Great America. The fest contin- 
ues every weekend until the end 
of October. 

Throughout Fright Fest 
guests can still enjoy the thrills of 
their favorite rides. Many of the 
park's rides reflect haunted 
theming, including Blood 
River™, Hearsey Highway, Sky 
Whirl and the BOO Line 
Railroad™. 

Fright Fest show schedule 
features the return of the musical 



comedy "Love at First Fright'* In 
the Grand Music Hall. In Theatre 
Royale, Dr. Sleep Productions 
presents Travis Fox, The Prince of 
Sleep, wielding his hypnotic pow- 
ers over volunteers. The 
Snowshoe Saloon is the site for 
"Goblins in Control," a special 
production for children. And, the 
frightful and delightful Zombie 
Jamboree Parade winds its way 
through the park each evening. 

For further information on 
Fright Fest call Six Flags Great 
America at 249-2133. 



Millburn Gallery 

The "Swing," an oil paint- 
ing by Gurncc artist, Ann Otis, 
will welcome guests to a fall 
show and reception on 
^•v Friday, OcL 7. Otis is well 
5vi: known for her viscosity etch- 
ings. Exhibiting with Otis arc 
Judy Bjorling, watercolors; 
Diane Fcdyna, oils; and Diane 
Schroeder, China painting. 
The opening reception will be held 
from 5 to 7:30 p.m. The Millburn 
Gallery Is located at 38500 N. Rtc. 45, 
Millburn Historic District, Old Mill 
Creek. For additional Information 
and gallery hours call 356-3022. The 
show will continue through the 
month of October. 

Pewter showcase 

Visiting artists Michael Boyett and 
Ann McGrory will introduce their 
newest sculptures at Pewter 
Showcase, 206 McHenry Rd., Buffalo 
Grove on OcL 15 and 16 from noon to 
4 p.m. Pewter Showcase, which has 
more than 200 sculptures on display, 
will feature the artists' newest cre- 
ations, "He Who Taunts the Enemy" 
and "Brother Wolf," during their visit 
A reception Is planned for the artists 
and guests of the gallery who wish to 
meet the artists. For further informa- 
tion call 634-0620. 



-SpEciA-l Events- — 

Celebrate AppleFest II In Long Grove 

The second annual Apple Festival takes place In the historic village of 
Long Grove, Rtcs. 53 and 03, from Friday, Sept. 30 through Sunday Oct. 2 
with lots of apples, plenty of food booths plus free musical cntertalnmcnL 
The weekend Is sponsored by the Long Grove Merchants Assn. Hours are 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. For 
a further Information call 634-0000. 

Las Vegas style benefit 

The public Is invited Sunday, OcL 1 at 3 p.m. as the Lake County Society 
for Human Development (LCSHD) sponsors its second Las Vegas style 
"Cash Casino and Poker Night" at Bortrand Bowling Lanes, 261 6 
Washington SL, Waukcgan. Admission price is $5 per person. Proceeds will 
benefit the LCSHD. The non-profit agency assists individuals with disabili- 
ties to be more Independent In work and living. For farther Informatlon.call 
Arlcnc Dcmb at 872-1700. 

Ride Into autumn 

Embrace autumn with an old-fashioned horse-drawn hay ride through 
McDonald Woods Forest Preserve near LindenhursL Join a forest preserve 
naturalist for a guided tour of one of Lake County's prettiest forest preserves 
on Sunday, OcL 2. Choose from three times: 12:30, 1:30 and 230 p.m. , 
Advance payment Is $6 for Lake County residents, $10 for non-residents. Fee 
on the day of hayrldcs Is $8 for residents, $12 for non-restdents. Call 948- 
7750 for reservation information. , 

Cancer survivor's walk 

The Robert H. Lurie Cancer center of Northwestern Univ. will sponsor 
their second annual Cancer Survivor's Walk on Sunday, OcL 2. Proceeds 
from the walk will benefit the Robert H. Lurie Cancer Center, which coordi- 
nates programs in cancer research, education and patient care at 
Northwestern Univ., its Medical School and affiliated hospitals. The walk 
will begin at 9 a.m. at Lake Shore Drive and Randolph Streets, Chicago. The 
entry fee Is $15. For further details call (312)503-2421. 

Silent Auction set 

Lake County Center for Independent Living will be holding its second 
annual benefit and silent auction on Sunday, Oct. 2 at the Hyatt Deerfield. 
Individual tickets arc $40. During the evening a silent auction and raffle will 
be held. The grand prize for the raffle will be two round trip American 
Airlines tickets anywhere within the 48 contiguous United States. For more 
information call Lorl Clark at 949-4440, 

Fall photo contest begins 

Kenosha Area Tourism Corp. is sponsoring a fall photo contest. The 
contest runs now through January, 1995 and is open to amateur and profes- 
sional photographers from Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan and 
Minnesota. There is a separate category for children 12 and under. The con- 
test seeks the best fall photos of Wisconsin events, attractions, scenery or 
destinations. For entry Information call 1(800)372-2737. 






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TEAK FULL SIZE BED $399 


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OPEN: Mon.-Thurs. 10-6, Friday 10-8, Saturday 10-5, Sunday 12-5 

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2053 22nd Avenue, Kenosha, Wl 531 40 
Villa Capri Shopping Center Ph. 551-8844 





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■ 



LIFE'S A BEAR 



DONNA ABEAR 



Luck be a lady named Bernadette 




•If a person carries a rabbit's 
foot for luck, what does the rabbit 
carry? Foot insurance? 

•Is Murphy's Law a real law, 
and if it is, who voted for it? 

•If I'm one -quarter Irish, does 
that mean I'm only one-quarter 
lucky? 

•If you're born with a silver 
spoon in your mouth, is it 
painful? 

These are Just a few of the 
strange thoughts about luck that 
I've been having this week. No, it 
wasn't the pizza we had for din- 
ner last night It's my upcoming - 
vacation to Florida; The other 
day, my girlfriend, Bemle (that's 
short for "Bernadette"), who's 
going with me to Florida, called 
me and said, "Have you looked at 
your ticket? Guess what airline 
we're flying?" My heart sank. Just 
my luck. US Air. The airline 
whose latest commercial should 
go like this: 

The camera zooms in on a 
comedian who is entertaining an 
audience. 

"Riddle question— if a plane 
crashed on the border of Canada 
and the United States, where 
would they bury the survivors?" 

An audience member yells 
out, "You don't bury survivors." 

"That's right," says the come- 
dian, "and besides, mere were no 

Sunburst beauty 
pageant set Oct. 7 

The Ramada Inn, Waukegan, 
will be the' site for the Sunburst 
Baby and Sunburst USA 
Preliminary Beauty Pageant on 
Friday, Oct 7 at 6 p.m. Winners 
and runners-up will go on to the 
Sunburst state finals In May to 
represent their area. 

The baby pageant is for boys 
and girls in the following age 
groups: Baby— under 1; Tiny— 1 
yean little— 2 and 3 years. 

A king and queen will be cho- 
sen in each group. They will 
receive a crown, trophy, banner 
and their $200 beauty entry fee 
paid to the state finals. 

The Sunburst USA Pageant is 
for girls in these age groups; 4 to 
6, 7 to 10, 11 to 13, 14 to 17 and 18 
to 27. The queen in each age 
group will receive a crown, tro- 
phy, banner and their $200 beau- 
ty entry fee paid to the state 
pageant. Runners-up in every age 
division will receive a trophy and 
their $200 beauty entry fee paid 
to the state pageant 

Entry forms are available at 
Carters Child ren s Wear in Guraee 
or call Kay Dees, state director at 
(904)241-3108. 



survivors— the airline was 
USAir." The audience laughs 
hysterically. I know how they 
feel. 

Luck can be cither a good 
thing or a bad thing. Good luck is 
someone who has given birth to 
six children and has no stretch 
marks. Bad luck is when the baby 
refuses to take a nap, the dog has 
an accident on the floor, your 
husband says he'll be late for din- 
ner, you forgot to defrost the 
meat, and finally, as you begin 
mumbling "Calgon, take me 
away!," you realize you're out of 
Calgon. Most people believe they 
have either one kind of luck or 
the other. Not me. I have 
"strange luck." 

Let me give you an example. 1 
recently had a birthday, and as 
part of my present, my husband 
told me to hire a cleaning person 
for a day. This person was due to 
arrive at 1 p.m., but called and 
asked if she could come early, 
about 9 a.m. I said that would be 
fine. Well, 9 a.m. came and went, 
with no cleaning person in sight 
Finally, at 10:30 am., I phoned 
her home. Her husband 
answered. 

"Is Angle there?" I asked. 

"No, she's at your house," he 
told me. 

■ "No, she's not" 

"Yes she is. She called me 
from mere about an hour ago." 

"Really? That* s weird, because 
she's not here." I told him, think- 
ing to myself that perhaps she 
had used me as an alibi while she 



C RAFTERS 
WANTED!!! 



1 



J 




For 

Santa's 
reakfast 

Sat., Dec. 3 

For more info, 

please call Max 

(anytime), 

j87-8117or 

Chen 

(815)385-6973 

Evenings Only. . 

'roceeds For F.L. School ■ 



' conducted a secret affair. I said 
good-bye to her. poor sap of a 
husband, and waited for the 
hussy to arrive, albeit late. 

By .11:30 am, I was really get- 
ting mad. I called her number 
and, again, her husband 
answered, 

"Is Angle there? This is Mrs. 
Abear. She never showed up." I 
said. I hated to be the one to 
break this to him, but he had to 
wise up eventually. 

"Well, it's kind of a. long 
story.. .she just walked in. I'll let 
her explain it to you." 

Angle picked up the phone, 
and started babbling something 
about my house and the house . 
across the street, and the police, 
and finally I interrupted her. 

"Let me get this straight You 
cleaned the house across the 
street by mistake?" 

"Yes. Oh, I hope they don't 
call the police." 

"For what? Clean and run?" 

So that's the kind of luck I 
have, Strange. Though I'm not 
really superstitious, I've decided 
to increase my odds for a safe 
flight by stacking the deck in my 
favor. 1. Clean underwear. No 
one ever dies in clean underwear. 
2. A garlic necklace. Oh, sorry - 
that's vampires. . 3. Wait a 
minute, I forgot — I have an ace in 
the hole. There's no need to 
worry. My girlfriend Bernadette 
is Irish. 100 percent. A - f:r ; 

Here's pur prayer for take- 
off— "May we land in Florida half 
an hour before the devil knows 




Friday, October 7 

Ramada Inn 

Waukegan 

BOYS & GIRLS: 

Under One, One and Two and Three 
Years, Judged on facial beauty 
GIRLS: 4-6, 7-10, 11-13, 14-17, 16-27 
judged on beauty, poise & 
projection. Ev«ryon» will rccclv* ■ 
trophy. Entries may be picked up at 

CARTERS CHILDREN'S WEAR 
GURNEE 

or phone 1-904-241-3108 to receive 
an entry by mail. 






ScpTiMbcit 70, 1994 UkEiANd Newspapers IAKELIFE 





Restaurant serves genuine, 
regional Italian cooking 



CLAUDIA M. LENART 



Regional Editor 

Coco Pazzo Restaurant, 300 W. Hubbard St In Chicago, has 
been impressing lovers of genuine regional Italian cooking for 
two years. At only 23, Chef Cristiano Bassani has received rave 
reviews. A native of Bergamo, Italy, Chef Bassani has incorporat 
ed his creativity and style with Tuscan cooking which empha- 
sizes freshness. Following is one of Chef Bassani 's creations. 

Penne alia Slclllana 

1 pound box penne 

1 eggplant, diced 

4 plum tomatoes, diced 

3 caps tomato puree 
20 black Mediterranean 
olives - pitted 
1 tablespoon capers , 
1 cap shredded, aged 
rlcotta cheese 

4 cloves garlic, sliced 
6 leaves basil, shredded 
1 cup olive oil 

1/4 cap grated parmesan eh 
salt 

pepper 

Boil water for pasta. In a saute" pan, heat in the olive oil and 
brown the garlic Add the eggplant, black olives, tomato, tomato 
puree, capers, and basil — bring to a simmer, Drop pasta into - 
boiling, salted water. Add a touch of parmesan to the simmering 
sauce and continue to simmer — season for salt and pepper. 
When al derite drain the pasta and toss it with the sauce — cook 
for a few minutes. Put on a serving platter and top with aged 
ricotta cheese. 




■ 

* ■ 



Fall Sale 




It's Fall Sale Time at Scandinavian Design. 

Everything is on Sale, 

Even Ekornes, and Techline. 

save 10% TO 50% NOW 

THRU NOVEMBER 5TH 

Scandinavian 



Design 



3127 RocMWtt Rd. - Konotha Wi 6524034 

Hours: Mon.-Tnurs. 10S, Fri. til 9, Sat til 5, Sun. 1-5 





LAKELIFE UkEUrd Newspapers ScpTinbcR 50,1 994 



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Thrift, bake sale set 

MUlburn Congregational Church, Rte. 45 and Grass Lake Road, Mltlburn Is 
planning a thrift and bake sale on Friday, Sep t. 30 from noon to 6 p.m. and on 
Saturday, Oct 1 from 8:30 a.m. to noon. For further details call Ruth Wells at 
662-3901. „ 

Solo goes on a hayrtde 

Solo Singles will meet at the Chain O' Lakes State Park, Rtc. 12 north to 
WHmot Road, Spring Grove at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 1 for a hayridc. Call 816- 

1011 for further details. ■ '.''■- 

'Autumn Romance* fashion show 

All arc invited Saturday, OcL 1 at 11:30 a.m. as the Lake County Society for 
Human Development, 3441 Sheridan Rd., Zlon, together with Chlco's Clothing 
Store sponsor their first "Autumn Romance" fashion show and luncheon. The 
event will take place at the Gurnec Holiday Inn, 6 161 W. Grand. Adult admission 
is $17.50, children under 12 are $6. Tickets may be purchased at the door. All 
proceeds benefit the Lake County Society for Human Development, a not-for- 
profit agency assisting Individuals with disabilities to be more Independent In 
work and living Call Arlene Demb or Carol Curl at 872-1700 for tickets. 




'••' Sunday 



::■:•:«>:::-:•:•:•>:■:■:--•::: 




Silent auction set 

Lake County Center for Independent Living will be holding their second 
annual major fund raising benefit and dinner dance and silent auction on OcL 2 
at the Hyatt Deerfield. Individual tickets are $40 each. Lake County Center for 
Independent Living Is a private, non-profit organization that provides indepen- 
dent living services to Individuals with disabilities. Call 949-4440 for more infor- 
mation. 

'Walk with Me> to fight Alzheimer's disease 

"Walk With Me" In the 1994 Memory Walk, a 5K and 10K walk sponsored by 
the Chicago Area Chapter of the Alzheimer's Assn. on Sunday, Oct 2 In Grant 
Park. Registration starts at 9 a-m, at Madison and Michigan Ave. Memory Walk 
begins at 10 a.m. For registration information call 933-1000. 




r Selective Singles Social Club plans party 

Selective Singles Social Club will sponsor a wine and food pairing party on 
Tuesday, Oct 4 from 6 to 9 p.m. at Pappagallo's Italian Rlstorante, 246 Grcenbay 
Rd., High wood. Cost is $12. Call 510-0202 for further details. 

Sports medicine open house tours 

Physical Therapy and Sports Medicine Center of Gurnec will be sponsoring 
an open house to help celebrate National Physical Therapy month in October. 
On Tuesday, Oct 4 open house tours will be held as well as a fitness screening, 
"How to Start an Exercise Program," and "Careers in Physical Therapy." On 
Wednesday, Oct 19, open house and tours will be held as well as posture 
screenings, "Flexibility for Runners Who Do Not Like To Stretch," "Living with 
Arthritis." Times on both nights is 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. and arc free. Call 855-0022 
to reserve a seat 

Power selling conference 

Sales and Marketing Management magazine holds Power Selling National 
Conference and Exposition Oct 4 through 6. First two days from 7:30 a.m. to 
6:30 p.m.; third day from 8 a.m to 12:15 p.m. at die Chicago Hilton and Towers. 
Fee is $795. Call 1(800)765-7616 for registration. 



'Quiz Show,' return to innocence 

- fertilized as a better-looking son 
of a well-known family of high 
class academic WASPs takes over. 

Flcnncs is perfect as the neat 
and impeccable Van Doren, son 
of an admired American poet, 
played with finesse by Paul 
Scofield. 

We sec this academic aristoc- 
racy crumble right before our 
eyes as those shocking headlines 
scream that everyone, from the 
network, to the sponsor, down to 
Van Doren, were cheating, while 
we were all holding our breaths 
and cheering Van Doren on. 

Turturro just about steals the 
^^^_^ ___^ _ show as the shadowy, irate and 

WW - m .quiz m«t.r ^ff^SS^t ° nd ^^ 

John Turturro. as thoy vto for -Twonty-Ono V cash |ackpot. reaJ ^ of me > pIot mrn ^ outto 

Were the post-war 1950s as lottos were commonplace, when be young Van Dorcn's effort to 
innocent as we remember them winning $64,000 was a biggec *^&lggggg*& T 

In "Quiz Show," Bedford 
deals with the beginning of our 
disillusion with heroes who have 
clay feet, as It dramatizes the real 
life story of the quiz show 
"Twenty One, "and of two popu- 
lar "nerdy bralntrusts," Herbic 
ready to canonize him- although Stempel, played by John 
he could have been chasing the Turturro, and Charles Van Doren, 

Beaver's mother around the stu- played by that fine actor Ralph guardian. _ 

dio Fiennes, who received an Oscar We give "Quiz Show," 3.5 

"Quiz Show" is the story of nomination for his great work in stars out of five since Rcdford 
the time when there was no "Schindler's List" does get a bit longteh in a few 

"Hard Copy," or "Inside Edition," We see gigantic cult follow- scenes. As a whole though, this is 

to dish us the dirt every evening, ings grow and grow-as Stempel the best people picture he has 
It takes us back to an era when keeps answering those tough {J™ "J* £*£%?* Pcoplc ' ~ 
the eggheads who were sending questions week after week— and by GLORIA DAVra 
rockets into outer space and 
seemingly upright intellectuals 
like the Kennedy brothers fasci- 
nated us all. 

We were involved in TV 
shows centered on outstanding .. 

people and not scandals, like g H.50 all seats all shows 
Ralph Edwards' "This is Your g ANGELS jJN I THE JOUTF1ELD (PC) 
Life, and a few quiz shows offer- a 3 ; os-s:ir>7:is-9:35 

g SAT. * SUN. 1:003:05-5:10-7:15-9:35 

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H FRL & MON.-THURS. 3: lO- 5:15-7:1 5-9:35 
B SAT. & SUN. 7:16-9:35 

S FUNT3T0NES(PG) 

a SAT. & SUN. ONLY 1:16-3:1 5-5:20 



to be, or did we just think they 
were? 

Robert Redford, wearing his 
directorial hat in "Quiz Show," 
captures the real essence of those 
years when we all thought that 
'Father Knows Best," and were 



utation with the intelligencia, 
even if he has to compromise his 
integrity to do it 

Rob Morrow, of TVs 
"Northern Exposure/ does well 
as a nosy Jewish reporter who 
enjoys moving into Van Doren's 
WASP-ish circle, as he surprising- 
ly becomes Van Doren's 



Belvidere Mall 

Theatres 662-741 O 

Belvidere at Lewis in Waukegan 



ing thousands of dollars (big 
money then) in prize money to 
those who knew the right 
answers. 

This was before $100 million 



Air Conditioned 
BLANKMAHCPQ13) 

FRI. & MON.-THURS. 3-5-7-9:25 
SAT. A SUN. 1:10-3-5-7-9:25 

A GOOD MAN IN AFRICA ffl) 

FRI. & MON.-THURS. 5:20-9:40 
SAT. & SUN. 1-520-9:40 



JURASSIC PARK (P013) 

DAILY 2:55-7:15 



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^Meetings 



LAKE ZURICH THEATRES 708-550-0000 



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Corporate Wive 's club 

A social and support group is now 
being formed in the Lake County 
area. The purpose of this organization 
will be to help women meet other 
women with similar interests and 
experiences. For details contact 
Donna Kessing at 249-0013. 

Mothers of twins 

Lake County Mothers of Twins Club 
meets the third Thursday of the 
month at Warren Twp. Library. Call 
Robin at 244-7762 for further details. 

AJ Anon 

Al-Anon meets, at 7 p.m. eery 
Monday. at Peace Lutheran Church, 
1050 S. Rand Rd., Lake Zurich. For 
further Information call Sandy at 540- 

0601. 

Parent Group 

The Parent Group sponsors weekly 
Parents Anonymous support groups. 
Fridays from 9 to 11 a.m., Thursday in 
Vernon Hills from 7 to 9 p.m. and In 
Zion on Tuesdays from 8 to 9 p.m. 
and Wednesday from 3 to 4:30 p.m. 
For more information call 263-7272; 

Divorce support 

A women's divorce support- group 
meets twice a month on Wednesday 
evenings. Call Lisa at 680-4106 for 
more information. 

CblldServ 

The Lake County Business 
Partnership Child Care Initiative is 
looking for responsible and nurturing 
adults to provide quality infant and 
toddler care In their home. By becom- 
ing part of this unique partnership 
you can receive many benefits Includ- 
ing: running your own business, 
assistance with child referrals, and 
much more. For more information 
call Dena Thompson at ChildServ, 
263-2200.. 



|^T#1 ■■■SI: 



22. LAKE ZURICH 



6 OO ADULTS ■ 3 0.0 CHILDREN (llinlpr Mi 
'3 OO MON -FF1I UNTIL 5 f'M SAT & f.UN UNTIL 2 30 fM 





MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW START FRIDAY 9/30/04 




niVGn WILD (PQ13> 


1 ;4S~4:15-6:45-a:S5 




QUIZ SHOW (PQ13) 


1:2O-3;40-6:20-e:50 




THE SCOUT (PQ13) 


1 :3O-3:40-e:1 S-B:2S 




TERMINAL VELOCITY <P013) 


1-3:15-«:4Q-a:45 




TIME COP <R> 


1 :4S~4:1 0-6:50-0:05 




NEXT KARATE KID (PO) 


1:10-3:35-G:35-0:5O 




NATURAL BORN KILLERS <R) 


1:10-4-0:30-0:10 




THE MASK <PQ13) 


2-4-6:30*0:30 




FORREST OUMP (PQ13) 


12:45-3:23-e:OS-o 




CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER (PQ13) 


1 2 :0O-3:4S-6:3S-O: i S 



SHOWPLACE 1-7 815-455-1005 
ROUTE 14 & ROUTE 31, CRYSTAL LAKE 

■6 00 ADULTS ■ '3 00 CHILDREN (Undo I I I I 
•3 00 MON FRI UNTIL S PM SAT A SUN UNTIL 2 30 Pf.1 



MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW START FRIDAY fiWVM 
I QUIZ SHOW (PQ13) 12:45-3:25-0:10-8:55 

TIME COP (R) 2:10-4:15-6:50-0:50 

TERMINAL VELOCITY (POI 3) 2:15-4:30-6:45-0:05 

I NATURAL BORN KILLERS (R) 1 :1 5-3:45-6:20-8:40 

FORREST OUMP (PQ13) 12:30-3:20-6:05-0 

CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER (PQ13) 12:30-3:30-6:15-0 



OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE 



II I II I 1 1 I I X II I III 



MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW START FRIDAY 

SHOWPLACE 8 -26 N. WILLIAMS STREET. CRYSTAL LAKE 
•5- Adults - '3' Child (11 & Under) 815-455-1005 



THE RIVER WILD (PG13) Rtl:4M;Sit*SwwJ:1W.i»4:a4;Mon..Ttw«.i:4M 



ANTIOCH THEATRE 378 LAKE ST.. ANTIOCH 
395-0216 



*4" ADULTS •2* CHILD (11 & UNDER) «2" UNTIL 5 P.M. 
RIVER WILD (PG13) Fit 6:45-1; Sit. * Sun. 2: 154:304:454); Non.-Thun. MM | 



LIBERTYV1LLE 1 & 2 -70B N MILWAUKEE. LIBERTYVILLE 

362-3011 



•4.00 Adults - '2.00 Child (1 1 & Under). Sal., Sun. & Mon. Firs) Afternoon Show 
MILK MONEY (PG13) Frl «:4S-»; SaL * Sun. MS*, Hon.-Tliura.MS4 

ANDRE (PG) S*L*Suft.Z;1W:M 

Frl. «:3Q-M5; Sat ft Sun. 24:1 5*»M5; 
IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU (PG) Mon.Thura. 1:304:45 



McHENRY 1 & 2 214 GREEN ST.. McHENRY 
(815) 3850144 



•4.00 Adults - '2.00 Child (1 1 & Under) Bargain Matinee Unlil 5:00 p.m. 

FrtMW;«;»**lun.2:lW:lM*4:45; 
lha-ThUrt.4:*M:*5 



f GURNEE CINEMA H 

GURNEE MILLS SHOPPING MALL * 708-855-9940 


SH. CtT. SPECIAL $2.50 WEDS & FRI AFTERNOON. BARGAIN MATINEES -ADULTS $4 BEFORE 5:30 
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 THROUGH THURSDAY. OCTOBER 6 


QUIZ SHOW 

(NO PUSES) 


PO-13 


F-SU 12:104:004:504:40-, U-TH 4:004:50440 


THE SCOUT 

(NO PASSES OR MOVIE FUN TICKETS) 


PG-13 


F-S0 12:15-2:354:50-7:004:15: H-TH 4:50-7:009:1$ 


RIVER WILD (OTS) 


PO-13 


F-SU 12:00-2:35-4:55-7^04:45; U-TH 4:55-7:209:45 


TIMECOP 


R 


F-SU 12:450:009:15-7:309:50: U-TH 5:15-7:30-9:50 


TERMINAL VELOCITY 


PG-13 


F-SU 12:30-2:454:55-7:154:25; M-TH 4:55-7:1 5*25 


FORRESTQUMP 


PO-13 


F-SU 12:503:454:454:35; M-TH 4:00*454:35 


CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER 


PO-13 


F-SU 1:1O4;O5-7:OS-10:0O; F-TH 4:O5-7.-OS-1O:00 


CORRINA, CORRINA 


PG 


F-SU 2:254:55; M-TH 6:55 


NATURAL BORN KILLERS 


n 


F-SU 1:304:30-7:154:50; U-TH 4:307:15*50 


TRUE LIES 


R 


F-TH 1 :2O4:1O7:004:$5; M-TH 4:10-7:004:55 ' 


IN THE ARMY NOW 

mil . 


PG 


F-SU 12:15-4:45-9:20; M-TH 4:454:20. 




cjnntrOt*an 



ClNEpUx OdtON THEATRES 



RIVERTREE COURT 



Quiz SflOlV (PG-13) (Dolby) 
1K)0-4:00-7:00-10:00 



. The Scout (PG-13) (Dolby) 
1:15-3:25-535-7:45-955 



Tfte River Wild (PG-13) (Stereo) (on 2 screens) 
12:45-3:00-5:15-7:30-9:45 



Cortina, Cortina (PG) (Dolby) 

2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30 



Natural Born Killers (R> (Dolby) 

2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45 



Clear and Present Danger (PG-13) (Stereo) 

1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00 



Forrest Gump (PG-13) (Stereo) 

1:00-4 S)0-6:50-9;50 



HAWTHORN CENTER 






CORRINA, CORRINA (PQ13) 
MILK MONEY (PG13) 



Frl. 4344; M. A tun. M:«4SI4; IMfv-Tnun. 4: 144 



TTTIIMIIIIIIIIII 



Tertninal Velocity (PG-13) (Dolby) 

1:10-3:20-5:30-7:4 0-950 



Time Cop (R) (Dolby) 

1:20-330-5:40-750-10:00 



True Lies (R) (Dolby) 

Sat., Sun. 1504:20-7:10-9:55; Fri. 7:10-955; Mon.-Thr. 8:00 



Jason's Lyric (R) (Dolby) 
2:154:45-7:15-9:45 



T-TTTT 



■MB 



f ftryp flT 



-*-** «T1*? 



SfprtMbtR 50, 199 4 UMancJ NewspApew LAKE LIFE I 





1 COUPON 



AFFORDABLE OPTICAL 

- IN GURNEE MILLS 
; (708)855-9009 

(Near Bugle Boy. Entrance B) 

Mon.-Sat. 1 0-9 pm. Sun. 11 -6 pm 




J Dally Wear Clear Soft Lenses (Spherical) 
\wHh purchase of any glasses and eye exam. 

■ Some Restrictions Apply 

Exp. 11-15-94 
J- «... COUPON — — — — j- — — — •COUPON' — — — 



COUPON 



Ron Otbach as Max Pilnco In Noll Simon's 'laughter on the 23rd 
Hoor.' 

Simon makes audience laugh 



PROGRESSIVE 
BIFOCAL GLASSES 




Selected Fashion Frames 

Exp. 11-15-94 



I 
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CONTACTS 

29* 



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! FREE' j 

i $1HGI£ MSKW LENSES 

! mm we purchase 

• OF AHY FRAME 



First time Patrons Only | 
Some Restrictions Apply I 

Exp. ,11-15-94 I 
I COUPON _l_ . COUPON, -.» «J «••••.«• COWPO## ,■■■■» J 



Some Restrictions Apply 

Exp. 11-15-94 



n&efi&ii 





-,:.,.. a:v ■-:; ; 



.• < t^fe 



W;rv*?.i** 



Neil Simon knows how to 
make an audience laugh, and his 
creative genius shines brightly in 
"Laughter on the 23rd Floor," his 
most recent autobiographical 
comedy that focuses not only on 
his life but on- our cultural her- 
itage as welK 

The play/being staged in an 
open run at Chicago's Briar Street 
Theater, recalls events based on 
Simon's early career as a televi- 
sion writer in the 1950s for Sid 
Caesar's "Your Show of Shows." It 
stars Ron Orbach as Max Prince, 
an obvious takeoff on the colorful 

Caesar. 

. Orbach has a real stage pres- 
ence as Max; an eccentric TV per- 
sonality, charged with being 
funny each week for 90 minutes 
before a live audience. It's a chal- 
lenging role, and beyond the 
camera lights scotch and tran- 
quilizers case the way: 

"Laughter on the 23rd Floor, 
takes place in the New York City 
office where an oddball collec- 
tion of creative pranksters piece 
together, joke by joke, the skits 
that will constitute the following 
week's TV show. 

The group is introduced by 
Lucas, the Neil Simon character, 
who is played by Peter Rcgis- 
Civetta. Arid the room is a caul- 
dron of petty jealousies, earthy 
language and battered egos. It's 
fascinating to watch Mike 
Houlihan, who plays Brian, an 
aggressive Irish writer, spar with 
Ira (Matt DeCaro), a perennial, 
hypochondriac William Brown, 
as Kenny, delivers cutting lines 
with a subtle, stiletto approach, 
while William Dick is a scene- 
stealer as Milt in. an unlucky 
white suit. 

But Orbach is the most com- 
manding presence of all, with his 
quick mood swings (he punches a 
hole in the wall at news that the 
notorious Joseph McCarthy was 
accusing Gen. George Marshall of 
being a Communist.). He's ego- 
centric, yet fully devoted to his 
loyal "family" of writers. 

Directed by Michael Leavitt, 
"Laughter on the 23rd -Floor" 
adds up to one amazing night at 



the theater. Ticket information is 
available at 312-348-4000.— by 
TOMWITOM 




THURSDAY. SEPT. 29 - SUHDflY. OCT. Z 



- 



Check the 

Classified Section 

Each Week When 

Looking for 

a New Job 



Visit Gumee Hills Hall thlsThursday through Sunday and visit exhibitors 
throughout the mall with the latest trends to update and modernize your 
home. The Hodem living Show features ideas for landscaping, patio 
enclosures, windows, siding, flooring, roofing, remodeling and more. 



<HRHEE MILLS 

Hill Rtu's: HiHu " .SitM'iT 10 :00* H - i :0 OPH : SiHiy 1 1 :00»H- 6:00 PH 




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LAKELIFE UIceIancJ Newspapers SepTCMbea 50,1994 



Where To 
Eat Out 



FEATURE 

OF THE 

WEEK 





Daily 
Dinner Special. 



SERVED TUESDAY - SUNDAY 

(Except Saturdays) 

October 4-9 

Breast of Chicken Marsala . . . V*V5 



Pork 



Kabob .. $ 10.95 



Baked 



Halibut $ 1 1.95 



Veal 



Lembney A. Aim V^ 



BBQ Back 



Ribs *13.95 



Casual attire, moderately priced, by reservation, charge cards accepted. 




® ¥ Qlmmirg ^gutw 

^Restaurant Sc |8attquEt JfacilttifiB 

Gracious dining in the Wesley Sears Country Estate 




Rts. 120 & 45 - Grayslake • (708) 223-0121 
Your Hosts, Bill and Kris Govas 



Country Squire - a perfect place 

There are a lot of events happening in October at 
Country Squire that everybody will enjoy. There's 
Sweetest Day, when you take your sweetheart out for 
lunch or dinner, Bosses Day, Secretary's Day, and, of 
course, Halloween. Country Squire doesn't feature 
anything special on the menu for Halloween, but their 
fall decorations will be up for everyone's enjoyment. 
For Secretary's and Sweetest Days, you'll certainly find 
something special on the menu that'll be an extra 
treat.. .come and sec! 

When Country Squire came up with the "Specials 
for the Week", they weren't certain how their 
customers would respond to the items that weren't on 
the regular menu. Well, they found out.. .due to the 
overwhelming response, a 5th week was added to the 
special menu, so look for the weekly ads. They've even 
repeated items because customers have asked them to! 

Country Squire's full course dinners are cooked to 
your order (they wouldn't have it any other way!), and 
like their regular dinner menu, you'll enjoy their 
famous Lazy Susan (some folks call it a meal in itself), a 
salad with choice of dressing and potato, vegetable, 
beverage, and dessert. This, along with your entree, is a 
great combination for a reasonable price! 

The regular menu hasn't changed, so you'll 
definitely find your old favorites! Just remember...the 
specials are served beginning on Tuesdays after you see 
their advertisement in the paper, and continue every 
day except Saturday and Sunday. Response to the 
Sunday dinners have been terrific! A lot of families arc 
remembering the way it used to be with those Sunday 
family dinners at Grandma's, and it's nice that so many 
folks arc celebrating those days at the Country Squire 
without the hassle of cooking up a storm. 

Leisurely family dinners where you can sit around 
and chat over a delicious meal, ..if you haven't tried it, 
get your family together and give it a whirl. You'll 
probably wonder why you didn't do it sooner. Don't 
forget. .Thanksgiving is right around the corner and, 
yes, Country Squire will be serving those great turkey 
dinners that lets you take leftovers home so you can 
snack away the rest of the day! Remember to begin 
making those holiday party reservations for Christmas 
and New Year, too. 

Country Squire appreciates their customers, whose 
suggestions are always welcome. Drop by for a 
delectable meal soon at Country Squire, 19133 Route 
120 in Grayslake, 223-0121. 







•Family Style 
Dining 

•Open 7 Days 
A Week 

•Full Menu 

•Full Bar 



"JOIN US FOR DINNER TONIGHT!" 

Monday - Thursday We Serve 
Shrimp Temporal 

THE SILO 

Rt. 176. Lake Bluff 

(708)234-6660 




I Rftcmnnc & Lounge ! 
^J^ 



Starting Oct 1st 

Serving Dinner 

h p.m. - Fii, SaL, Sun. 



Fit, Sat, Sun. 

PRIME RIB SPECIAL 



Reg.Cul 



Hr****!!" 




10-500 fwpW 
it'SbMMfl 

Got I (HuBfs 



Sunday -Champagne Brunch 

10 a.m. -2 p.m. 



Adults 



Fit & Sat. Nlte In Our Lounge 

Call (708) 395-4800 

40150 N. Rle. 59, Aniloch, Open to the Public 



i 



THE DEAN TAGGART FAMILY 



»* 



& 




tfilnrvr JfioiU* 



il]LHI;U* 



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• Local tdtn beautiful downtown Gttnur" 

438-0300 

FRIDAY BEST9SBS 

FISH FRY "A FAMILY IN TOWN 

RESTAURANT 

OPEN 7 DAYS 

Lunch & Dinner 

Breakfast on Sundays 

Children's Portions & Prices . 




Gilmer & Midlothian Roads • MusdeUn, Illinois 60067) 



JJ 

^Noodles 




Halim American Dining 



iBUY ONE 
| ENTREE 
IGET ONE; 



Previously, Red Noodle 



On Route 83, Just North of Rollins 
Round Lake Beach 

223-7010 




} Dining Room Only! 



| Not valid with any other 
J special offer or promotion. 
J " Expires Oct 31,' 1994 



San JLuis 

Mexican (Restaurant 6 s 'Bar- 




50 S. Green Bay Rd. 
Green Bay Rd & Washington St. 

Waukegan 
244-363$ 

Fqf/tos, Combination Dinners, 
Qhlmlchangas, Taco?& Morel 




Buy One Entree, Get Second 
1 12 Off or Fourth One FREE! 



t 
I 
I 
I 
I 



Dining Alone? 

Have a drink on ffie house wltfi entree, j 

Pteaw ptesGnl coupon. Onapof lotfi. Not vcfld on buffet, term a leaet value. ! 



Open 11 am-11 pm, SutvThurs.; 11 am-1 pm, Frt ft Sat. 




Dine In 

Or 
Carryout! 




fly Iteee 




You'll 
love 



Contemporary Thai Dining with a 
mouthwatering Thai Touch. 

— FOR LUNCH OR DINNER — 

367-19SO 

or ll«ft$li 

lictftd (nHrttwn VDift Cemmoni 
"J^ [<MTnrrnRlBrtimWiirM»IOe*tteta 

immmmmi | 



VBMWHUS 



HrtM.-lbui. 

11:30-10:00 

fit & Sot. 

11:30-10:30 

Sw'12-MO 



Tho 




Waterfalls 

Qcslfluranl • 5anqueLs • Lounge • Dance Club 

24436 W. Rt. 173 • Ant loch, IL 60002 
708-395-2212 



fr 




V 



[Jtnner Entrees 
?«!^l SUNDAY CHMJPJGNE8RUNCH. 

Enjoy After Dinner Drinks In My '8,90 
Our Oounge With Music From %9t c«!d 
the 60% 70% 80% &90's '199 Unfair ■ 




CLOSED MONDAYS 





Our W—kmnd Burnett 

OrfHnnwButlwt 

f malum* Ovmr $0 food 

ttmmtt 

Saturday Champogno Bnncft 
llam-ZXpm 

Satudoy Orrm Buffet 

230pm-lQpm 

FcoKjioo Roas! Duck . . . .*?.» 



A Sunday family 
Tradition Sunday 

Champagne Brunch 

I0cm-230pm 
■• SuTda/OmaBuflQl 

M0pnv9pm 

rcctulrvfl FVaV Idn & lutoy 

w/Drwing ......^.SO 



Join ut Filnday 

Nlfm-irt Mont than 

JuttAfHhFiy. 

Ova 60 norm foakilno You 
favaflg FWi tntew 

4pmt0pm V£Q 

faVBltdSpeddi-Spm Mm 




217 NO ROUTE 31. McHENRY (1 MILE SO OF RTE 120; • (B15J 344-0330 



* DAKOTA 
ROSE 



uttS^ 




SATURDAY NIGHT SPEp lAL 

1 2 oz. Ribeye 

& Stuffed Shrimp......... 

"The Biggest 'Hangover' In Town!" $ J A 95 

Full Rack BBQ Pork Ribs... J 4 

SUNDAY SPECIAL 

8 oz. N.Y. Strip 

& Fried Shrimp 



$a| A95 



$Q95 



8040 Sheridan Road 

Kenosha, Wisconsin 

Ph. 414-054-7500 



T,Wtd\Th 3:30-1 Op 

Fri a 8at 3:30-10:30p 

Sun. Noon-9:30p 

Closed Won. 






-•^VkM. 



■ ■— ^ 



imm 




ScpTCMbcn TO, 1994 UIceIancI NewspApERS LAKEUFE 




North Shore Lights perfect for weddings W HERE T O 



A winding staircase for the bride and groom, a 
charming lobby, crystal chandeliers, marble dance floors, 
and a fireplace is exactly what you imagine when you 
picture the perfect place for friends and relatives to gather 
in a celebration of marriage or other special event. At 
North Shore Lights at the Hotel Moraine, it's not just your 
imagination... it's a reality. 

Owners Bob and Tanya Wehrle have created an elegant 
atmosphere for not only weddings, but events like bar 
mitzvahs, reunions, company functions, birthdays; and 
more. Tanya Wehrle said, "There's no size limit.. .we will 
accommodate an event for 20 or 500 people." Wehrle 
stressed that North Shore Lights books only one function 
per evening in order for the staff to focus on giving you 
their undivided attention. Wehrle also offers personal 
consultation for brides and can even help with other 
aspects like finding bands, DJs, invitations, etc, and 



tf 



OPEN FOR LUNCH AND DINNER - 
DAILY DINNER SPECIALS 

7 DAYS A WEEK - 

Our Chef Prepares All Food 

Fresh When Ordered. 



S** 



*> 



. M-FiL-.-' 
Mun.-IOpjn. 
S*1M0pjn. 
Sun.tZ-9p.ni. 



HE 





Lttatri it 211* ether 

iMtfceutifltilitlUa 
Oriemrtkwcsttf 

RtW) 

949-5550 



YAN'S HUNAN INN 



Chinese Restaurant & Lounge 



r 




SERVING LUNCH & DINNER 



LUNCH BUFFET 

Wednesdays & Fridays 



100 V Milwaukee- Ave 
l.ihiTiyvillc II. 
7UK/HlH-fiH«8 



OPEN 7 

I DAYS A 

WEEK 



..iki'luirsi Knari, 



IViiuki'nan, II 
( am nm Spinal iMs 70KM7:i-UM) 



RESTAURANT 

OKTOBERFEST 

September 28 - October 1 6 

Serving Authentic German Entrees and Desserts 

Welner Schnitzel $10.25 

WithSpSfele ■■•■■■/:. 

Schlacht Platte ...........$9.95 

(Kasseler Ribcben, Veal Bra!, German Sausage) 

Rouladen $9.45 

With Red Cabbage 

Roast Duck ..$9.95 

With Bread Dumpling 

Sauerbraten $9.25 

Wilh Potalo Pancake . 

Poached Flounder ....$10.95 

Wilh While Dill Sauce, Boiled German Potatoes, 
German Style Green Beans 

Hasenpfeffer. ......................$9.25 

Wilh Spatzle 

Smoked Pigs Feet ...................$8.95 

Wit) Sauerkraul, Choice of Potalo 

(All Entrees Include: Soup and salad, choice of 

Pliaumon Kuchen or German Chocolate Cake) 

| . Entertainment provided by Ed Klsh on accordlan | 

Regular Menu Also Available" 

■ DUE TO 

POFUURDOWD, OD DOC JCNSEH ESTATE SE OOWJEH Of HTE. 173 4 S3 

**£.*?** *tf& 708-388.6474 , 

WKi &&*& Breahfast ALtiiKh Won. & Tues. 6 am-3 pm; 
MASTERCARD ty? BreaHctilunchtDiwrW9lllifi)Suri6am-9pai 



recommends booking your wedding reception at least one 
year ahead for a Saturday night North Shore Lights even 
offers a discount for those who book a Friday or Sunday 
wedding. A wedding package includes everything, 
including tax and gratuities. 

As far as the meal goes, each plate is detailed to 
perfection by Bob Wehrle, who has 40 years of experience 
as a chef at places like The Abbey, Lake Lawn, and 
Ihterlakcn. Start off with tantalizing appetizers, choice 
hors d'oeuvres or a crisp, fresh salad. The main course 
includes your choice of sliced roast tenderloin, medallions 
of veal in a wild mushroom sauce, or delicate cornish hen. 
Also, broiled swordflsh in lemon caper sauce, chicken 
oscar, or a thick, juicy slice of prime rib. All entrees are 
complimented with fresh bakery rolls and butter. End 
your meal with a choice from North Shore Lights' famous \ 
sweets table. 



Eat Out 



FEATURE 

or THE 

WEEK 




Nwtlbik 



ore, 




JVotfA 




£Xom 



3€o€e4 \4foutine 



20-500 

* Speck? £lk,i(te * Bar/Bat flfffeiHife 
9 Meetfty P faces * Compaq Fanctms 




tyou* Host TtkiffA W&kfiie 
ooraimu, Myites aoa topcan aw mar special 

events at t&& 

/\fortk$kor€,HoUt$or>ait(l 

For (H^matm ca$ 

708/433-5566 

700/\fJkMdwRi*ttfkwood 





,. FOX VC17 MOON; 

'£ FAMILY RESTAURANT ^ 



BREAKFAST * LUNCH * DINNER * OPEN 24 HR. 



•ialadi, freih fruil Plaiei -Omelettei, Pancakei 

Seafood, Steaks & Chopi -BucuKi & Gravy, Steak £ Eggi 

■Italian food, Broaited Chicken •Homemade Specials. Piei & Cakei 

•New York Style Cheeiecakei 

l:i>ery Holiday lit ink lull Moon i'or Specials. 



NICE ATMOSPHERE • REASONABLE PRICES • FAST SERVICE 

Private Room For Party Up lo 60 People . i 

1HQ £!0ft A7»)Q LUNCH SPECIALS! 



nnmm 



> 1,/emf Anmifti 'm> nnnvlos tlVW (>'»•*' I uVo N.iviti O.ist' 



GREAT ALL-AMERICAN 
FOOD & FUN 




The Village Tavern 

All You Can Eat Specials 

Served From 5 to 10 PM 

Tuesdays 

Meatloaf, Mashed Potatoes & Vegetables ■ 
$6.50 ■__ 

Wednesdays 

Chicken, French Fries & Coleslaw 
$6.25 

Thursdays 

BBQ Beef Ribs & French Fries 
$6.95 

Fridays 

Our Famous Fish Fry All Day 
With French Fries & Coleslaw 

AH Served With Homemade Bread 

" Whether you're oh your own, with a date, family or 
friends, The Village Tavern is always a great time! 

There's Always Fun & Entertainment 

Old McHenry Road in Long Grove 

(708) 634-3117 

All major credit cards accepted. 



► *-.,.*-- - ,^.r-_*^-^t*HO*«- »•%**■ 



v .• - •.., 



[ " ' - 




LAKEUFE UkclANd Newspapers SfprewbtR 70,1 994. 






rCROSSWORd 



ACROSS 

l Fido's treasure 
5 Sailor's drink 
8 — even keel 
(steady) 

12 Anagram for , 
tail 

13 DDE's command 

14 He wrote 
"Street Scene- 
IS Nocturnal bird 

17 Home or (lie 
Taj Mohnl . 

18 Stick together 

19 Williams of 
filmdom 

21 LP, for one 

22 Satisfy 

23 Sweet roll 
26 Airport info 
28 Holds up to 

scorn 
31 Nobelist Wiesel 
33 Sliglit taste 

35 Son of Loki 

36 The - Has 



Landed" 
38 Ethiopian 
title 

40 Dog's "dog"? 

41 Cod's cousin 
43 Inlet 

45 To.ihc — end 
47 Concurs 

51 Singer Adams 

52 Party nnlmhi? 

54 Prophet * 

55 Tokyo, once 

56 Arrow poison 

57 Soviet news 
agency 

58 — Mateo 

59 Ending for fin 
DOWN 

1 Judge's bench 

2 Hodgepodge 

3 1 1 Down, in 
dialect • 

4 Anesthetic 

5 Casts off. 



hhhh raws HWHQ 



INOUI 



blip] lEjara 

feCEHE) HUB tZlffitJ 

ODES HfeJP] 

BBiiPi hob nnerj 

EHGDH dfflPJ SEJHfcl 




6 — Hngcn 

7 "O tcinporu! 
O — !" 

8 Public speech 

9 Bedtime snifter 

10 Farm m ensure 

1 1 Close at hand 
16 Surgeon's 

patient? 



20 Grand total 

23 Stinger 

24 The gums 

25 Slumber wear 
27 Make public 
29 Malay isthmus 
.10 Work as a 

seamstress 
32 Click beetles 




.34 Model 
37 Use frugally 
39 Sound of relief 
42 Sea birds ' 

44 Bandleader . 
Shaw 

45 Actress Edna 

46 Brainstorm 
4H Eternities 

49 Cote dwellers 

50 Sly, in Dundee 
53 Miss Lttpino 




ARIES (March 21 to April 19) 
Your intuition is a valuable asset in 
business. Either you or a partner has 
a tendency, toward financial ex- , 
tra vagancc. A friend may have his or 
her feet out in the aisle (his week, 
causing you some awkward mo- 
ments. 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) 
You could get corned away when 
shopping for the home. Guard 
against unnecessary purchases. Tact 
will be needed in your business deal* 
ings, especially whcrc'highcMips arc 
concerned. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A 
tendency to let things slide on the job 
needs watching this week. You may 
not see eye to eye with an adviser 
cither. Guard against being too much 
of a loner. Those you shun now could 
be helpful to you soon. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) 
You and a partner are on the same 
wavelength. However, you may be at 
odds with a friend. While this friend 
scenvs to be taking advantage of you, 
it would be a good idea to try to 
overlook this for now. 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) Don't 
go overboard in your efforts to im- 
press bigwigs on the job. Though 
your judgment will be keen, you may 
find yourself dealing with a combat- 
ive type on the job. Don't let this 
throw you. It's only jealousy. 

VIRGO (August 23 to September 
22) A person you'll be dealing with 
(his week tends to exaggerate and a 
situation at work could irk you. 



Don't give in to (he temptation to let 
your temper fly. Instead, count to Jen 
and start over again. 

LIBRA (September 23 to October 
22) Spending could easily gel ottl of 
hand and a romantic interest or de- 
pendent could be especially touchy 
this week. You swing into a 
homebody phase and will prefer the 
domestic scene. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 

November 21) It's importont that 
you don't forget to fit I HI I a promise 
you made to a close tic. This person 
is counting on you. A matter relating 
to home may upset you, but partners 
ore in synch. 

SAG I'lTARIUS (November 22 to 
December 21) After letting things 
slide a bit, you'll rush to catch up this 
week. Be careful about this since this 
is when you'll be apt (o make care- 
less mistakes. Try to keep on an even 
keel where your work is concerned. 



CAPRICORN (December 22 to 
January 19) A friend who likes to 
hear himself or herself talk will bend 
your car. While you may not be in 
any mood for this right now, try to be 
patient. Shopping on impulse turns 
out to be a mistake. The weekend 
favors romance and leisure. 

AQUARIUS .(January 20 to 
February 18) If you're short- 
tempered with someone close to you, 
make sure you kiss and make- up. 
You have a tendency to be obstinate 
and should make an effort to. see the 
other side. Accent practicality in 
business. 

PISCES (February 19 in March 
20) Keep your mind on what you're 
doing and you'll prevent a careless 
oversight this week. A supervisor is 
watching you closely which means a 
promotion may soon k* in the offing. 
Be sure to pay attention to traffic 
rules, ~- ; " .T^Jl 




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inn 

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1 Karaoke * Club Dancing • C & W 
i Dancing ■ Restaurant • Banquets 

1 Come for the Food and Stay for the Fun! 



ERRY' 



Voted II 
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FRIDAY & SATURDAY! 

•Cliipoilc RoASTEd Duck 
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PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE! 
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AY EVENING 

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•Fish Fry •Fresh Scildd Bar 
Delicious Steaks • Bar-B-Q Ribs 
• Pasta A Morel 




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(7 am -1 p.m.) 

« Lunch COUNTRY 

(llam.-4Mp.iti.) RESTAURANT 

Bakery • Country Store • Orchard • Greenhouse 

300 S. Rte. 83 (1/4 Mi. N. of Midlothian Rd.) Mundefcin, IL (708) 5664520 
"Opri TU»i. Through Sun." 





R)s Eatery 



& The Outback Bar 

World's Finest Pizza 
Bring YourFamily. Video Game Room For Kids. 

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ALL YOU CAN EAT FISH FRY 



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Visit The Outback Bar - 
3 TVs To Waicb Your Favorite Sporting Events 

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Phona 356-2300 



*Ok>c«on«: Fiorn t«4, t+* ni». IM (QraMlAv*) PmOuim urn 
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DINE-IN ♦ CARRY OUT ♦ FMI DILlVtHV 
DOUILI DECKER ♦ THIN CRUtT ♦ PAN RIZZA 



VOU 

SHOULD 

BE HERE 

FRIDAY 



The best Seafood Dinners 
in town are on our menu. 

Enjoy our World Class 

Clam Chowder with our 

Fried Boneless Lake 

Perch Dinner or our 

Broiled Fresh Lake 

Superior Whitefish for only 

eleven ninety-five. 

You should be here Friday. 



i 




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StpnmhaJO, 1994. UktUNd NewspApcus BANK/FINANCE R 









ANC 





Lakeland 

Newspapers 



The sandwich generation— the financial issues 



So, your kids are either entering col- 
lege. In college, or are through with col- 
lege. Your parents' health Is falling and 
their financial needs are increasing. 

It's lucky you have a good job or 
prosperous business and all the time In 
the world to take care of both your cNI- 
dren and your parents. 
Congratulations, you are a member of 
the Sandwich Generation. You are cur- 
rently healthy, earning a good living 
and both your children and your par- 
ents will continue to be dependent on 
you for quite some time. 1 

What should you be doing with your 
own finances to make sure that you will 
lead a prosperous and successful life, 
have a comfortable retirement, protect 
yourself from financial reverses as wel 
as take care of your parents and your 
children? 

Financial evaluation 

- The first thing you should do Is a cur- 
rent financial statement. Ust all your 
assets and liabilities as well as your cur- 
rent Income to see what your resources 
are at this time. Only by doing this, can 
you see the potential effect of any 
reverses that might occur, which would 
cause your assets to decrease or your 
liabilities to Increase. 

You might contact your accoun- 
tant or financial planner to assist you 
with this process. 



Catastrophic reverses 

Make sure that the liability or gener- 
al Insurance area of your life Is well cov- ' 
ered. An unexpected liability loss can 
undo 25 years of planning, saving and 
Investing. Everyone should have a per- 
sonal liability umbrella policy of at least 
$1,000,000 and possibly more, as ihe 
more assets you have, the better target 
you are for potential liability suits. Your 
most valuable single possession might 
be you home., It's Important that you 
have this Insured on a replacement 
cost basis with all the bells and whistles 
covered. Taking a higher deductible 
might allow you to do this without 
Increasing your cost for this coverage. 

Protecting you income 

The cornerstone of your security, as 
wel as for those who depend on you. Is 
the Income you earn each month. 
Assets are nice, but a few people have 
substantial enough assets to take care 
of them In the event of a total arid per- 
manent disability. Be sure you have 
Individual non-cancelable disability 
Income coverage In an amount that 
will allow you to continue your life style 
and your obligations In the event you 
are disabled. 

Estate planning 

Estate planning Is more than the 
drafting of documents and directing of 




Have Just Gotten Better! 

GREAT INTEREST RATES • EAS Y TO APPLY » FAST APPROVAL 

Construction Loans 






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Highway 45 At Washington 
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Offer may be withdrawn it tay time, and ii available to qualified borrowen. Valid with aneww eaUtliiR 
checking account. Cloriug costt ore wul ved on approved and closed line* of credit up to •250,000. 



assets. It Is taking an overall lifetime look 
at the direction of your finances and 
making sure that bolti the titling of your 
assets, as well as drafting of documents 
coincides with your wishes to take care 
of those who are dependent on you. 
Too many people do not have a will or 
give any thought to the direction of 
their assets In the event of an unex- 
pected death. This can be devastating 
to all of those who depend on you, 
such as your spouse, children, and par- 
ents. 

Government retirement plans 

After you have taken care of your 
children and your parents, win .you and 
your, spouse be able to retire some 
day? Check with your employer to see 
If there Is a 401 (k) plan and contribute 
to this to the very maximum. You should 



be saving approximately 10 percent of 
your pre-tax Income to provide for a 
comfortable retirement at age 60 or 65. 

The Sandwich Generation Is an 
Interesting one. Those baby boomers; 
are now getting Into their fifties and 
have children with high expectations. In 
order to reach those .expectations, 
most of the children are being educat- 
ed In colleges and simultaneously their; 
parents are reaching an age where 
their financial and emotional needs are 
escalating.— by NICK J.BROWN 

Editor's note: Nick J. Brown Is presi- 
dent of The Planning Group, Glenvlew 
which Is a financial planning and con- 
sulting firm that counsels Individuals and 
businesses In all 50 states. Questions 
arte Invited by writing or call Brown at 
1247 Waukegan Rd., Glenvlew, IL 60025 
or 998-1640. 




Citibank 

Can Offer You Balance, 

Stability & Time Saving 

Resources. 

Citibank has been serving the Vernon Hills/ Libertyville/ Mundelein community for 15 
years. Citibank brings worldwide resources to a very traditional Chicagoland community. 
Citibank's Vernon Hills branch, on the comer of Milwaukee and Route 60 currently serves 
over 3000 households in the full range of products and services including the Citibank 
Money Management Account, business and Professional accounts and Investments 
through Citicorp Investment Services. Citibank has recently introduced its newest services: 
Citigold, Citibank on the Personal Computer, and Bill Payment 'Our staff is especially 
excited about our new services because they allow our customers to spend less time with 
their day to day banking and more time with their friends and families,' says Paul Nelson, 
Branch Manager. 

' Citigold brings together traditional banking, borrowing and investing. By having one 
combined account, customers can leverage all the power of their money and use time to 
their advantage. Customers can also connect a compatible personal computer to 
CITIGOLD ON-LINE to check balances, move money, buy a security through Citicorp 
Investment Services - even send messages to their Citigold Executive - 24 hours a day. 

Citibank on the Personal Computer is an extension of the time and place convenience 
Citibank already offers its customers through Citicard Banking Centers and its 24 hour 
Citiphone service. According to Nelson, 'Many of our customers have already signed up for 
the service. With Citibank on the Personal Computer, customers can do almost everything 
they can do in a branch from the comfort of their homes including being able to review 
balances, transfer funds and see the last 60 days of account activity, including Visa and 
Mastercards. Citibank on the Personal Computer also allows customers to pay their bills, 
buy and sell securities, get free stock quotes and even perform account maintenance such 
as stop payments on checks or address changes. Customers tell me it makes banking fun!' 

Citibank's personal computer-based service works with any personal computer 
applications platform • DOS, Windows or Macintosh - and supports modem speeds up to 
9600 baud. The service is supported by a dedicated customer service group, providing 
assistance 20 hours a day, seven days a week through a toll free 800 number. Citibank's 
Customer Relations Manager, Wendy Singer, would be happy to give you a Citibank on the 
Personal Computer demonstration the next time you stop by the branch. 

Bill Payment takes the hassle out of paying bills. It allows customers to pay just about any 
bill anywhere in the United States. Customers simply provide Citibank with a list of up to 
999 payees, and payments will be set up on a single or recurring basis. Once enrolled in 
Citibank's Bill Payment Services, customers can pay bills seven days a week, day or night, 
simply by call CitiPhone, by visiting any Citicard Banking Center or by taking advantage of 
Citibank on the Personal Computer. 

In addition to providing banking services to the community, Citibank consistently 
constributes to a number of organizations including local soccer teams, Vemon Hills Days 
and the Chamber of Commerce. 'The banks efforts really help to improve the Vemon Hilts 
community and the people who live and work here,' Nelson says. 

Paul and his team invite you to visit or call the Citibank Vemon Hills branch at 
708-816-8246 to find out more about these and other services. The branch is open on 
Monday through Friday 9:00-6:00, and Saturday 9:00-3:00, 

CITIGOLD is a service of Citibank, which provides banking and borrowing services, and 
Citicorp Investment Services, member NASD/SI PC, which provides investment services. 
Securities and annuities are not bank deposits or FDIC insured, are not obligations 
of or guaranteed by Citibank or Citicorp Investment Services, and involve risk to 
principal. 

Citibank • Vernon Hills 

700 North Milwaukee 
708-81 6-8246 

© 1994 CITIBANK, F.S.B. FDIC INSURED 




, fjfl BANK/FINANCE LAkelANd News P a P ers SfpTC«b« 10,1994 









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\Amim 



Finance 1994 fc^S"* 



Know best of both worlds 



If you're wondering whether Interest 
rates may be headed up or down In 
the near future, the answer Is "yes." 

No one can predict where Interest 
rates will go. For that reason, It's Impor- 
tant to build an Investment portfolio 
that performs well under a variety of 
economic and market conditions. 

One of the best ways to protect your 
savings Is by diversifying your portfolio 
among a number of different Invest- 
ments. This protects you from being 
severely affected by the performance 
of Just one stock or bond. Many safety- 
conscious Investors working toward 
long-term objectives find U.S. Treasury 
securities particularly appealing. 
U.S. Treasury securities 

U.S. Treasuries not only offer attrac- 
tive returns, but because they are 
. backed by the U.S. government, they 
rank among the safest Investments 
available. In addition, they provide reg- 
ular Income on a semi-annual basis, 
and the Interest they pay Is state and 
local tax free.' 

U.S. Treasuries are available In a vari- 
ety of maturities, ranging from three 
months to 30 years. In most cases, the 
Interest rates on longer-term bonds will 
be higher than shorter-term bonds. 
.+f However, shorter-term bonds offer more 
flexibility since money Is not locked Into 
one Investment for a long period of 
time. In addition, although all bond 
prices move when interest rates move, 
the prices of short-term bonds are typi- 
cally more stable than those of long- 
term bonds. That's particularly Impor- 
tant If you decide to sell your securities 
before they mature. 



Laddering 

Protecting your Income by diversify- 
ing among a number of different Invest- 
ments Is an Important strategy to 
remember. However, a well-planned 
portfolio Is also diversified by maturity 
dates, A portfolio that Includes short-. 
Intermediate-, and long-term bonds 
offer maximum flexibility and liquidity, 
This concept Is known as staggering 
maturities, or "laddering." 
The long and short of It 

Laddering U.S. Treasury securities Is 
an attractive strategy for Investors who 
want safety and liquidity. To demon- 
strate how It works, consider the follow- 
ing example. 

Brian and Judy Moore had $80,000 
to invest In U.S. Treasuries. Although 
longer-term bonds offered the most 
attractive interest rates, the Moores did- 
n't want to lock all their money Into a 
long-term Investment because they 
planned to use some of It for home 
Improvements a few years down the 
road. 

After talking to their Investment rep- 
resentative, the Moores decided that- 
laddering was the solution they need- 
ed. They split their Investment among 
two-year, five-year, seven-year and 10- 
year Treasuries, Investing $20,000 In 
each. As a result, a portion of their 
Investment earned the higher rates of 
long-term Treasuries and they still had 
money coming due In Just two years. 
When that time comes, the Moores can 
choose to reinvest It or use It to meet 
expenses they may have at that time. 

Editor's note: Copy submitted by 
Edward D. Jones and Co. 



The 
Percentages 

Are In 
Your Favor 

5.09% 

Annual Percentage Yield* . 



It's time you were making more money. That's why we're offering such a 
good interest rate on our 6-month Certificate of Deposit. You can open 
one with as little as $5,000, as long as the- money doesn't come from 
another First Colonial Bank account. Offer expires December 31, 1994, so 
stop by this week. At the bank that always gives you 100%. 

•Annual pownUae Yield (Al *) u of 9/14/94 nd is «tf>ject to cfaacge it my time. Inter* peid miirtejty. 
rEttS SbSeitpeomlty for etVty wilMiwwl. ThU c«er nayi^ be uied m coojuiKtioa wth my other oflte 
(at tail account. Depositors «xe government-insured up to $100,000. 



iillk Fox Lake State Bank 

ri\W A First Colonial Bank 

55 East Grand Avenue Fox Lake, Illinois 60020 708/587-21 12 



491994 FMCofcwU 



Member FDIC 



LENDER 






To See Why 
Bonus Banking Is So Popular. 



When it comes to checking account value, Bonus Banking is a breath of fresh air. Keep 
a minimum balance of '100 or more and you mil avoid the regular $9 monthly fee. 

Other benefits are a breeze, too, with checking plus: 



O Free personalized checks 


Credit <:ard protection 


O Accidental death insurance 


O Key ring registration 


© Nationwide travel and ENTERTAIN- 


O Emergency cash advance service 


MENT DISCOUNTS 


O And more 


O Unlimited check writing 


: ' '. 



For monthly fees that are gone with the wind, open your Bonus Banking' account today. 



STATE' 

^bank)) First State Bank 
of Round Lake 



OF 



MAIN OFFICE 

1777 N. Cedar LakcRd, 

Round Lake Beach, 

(708)546-2111 



Member FDIC 



BRANCH OFFICE 

Avilon & Goodnow Blvds. 
.Round Lake 
(708) 546-8444 




LOW FIXED RATES ON 

10, 15 & 30 
YEAR 

HOME LOANS 

SAME NAME, STAFF & LOCATION 
IN FOX LAKE SINGE 1975. 



Second Federal 



J' 



^ywwL 




tana* 1 



110 Years of Continuous Service 

Corner Grand and Rte. 12 
Fox Lake, Illinois 

^(708) 587-631 1 1 



. ■ .s ,. S - J - - - - . 



#■-**«•* 



--■*■■■■-■*■•-• 



f .; "■ * I*-* # ■ 



,* * * * * ^ 






■ *. «. fc, » ^* 4 • a * 



* ■ -» * r.-*,« 



' in? ? ■* - 





ScpTEMbuiO, 1994 UkclANd Newspapers BAN17FINANCE p 





Lakeland 



101 questions to ask a CPA 



One Way to know you have a CPA 
you can count on Is to work with a firm 
that's a member of the American 
Institute of. CPA's Private Companies 
Practice Section, a voluntary associa- 
tion of more than 6,500 CPA firms serv- 
ing private companies. 

Here are some questions you should 
consider asking: 

•Which Indicators of my company's 
financial performance should I track 
weekly, monthly, annually? Should I cal- 
culate these key Indicators or should a 



CPA do It? 

•When does a business need a full- 
time controller? What background , 
should he or she have? Can you sug- 
gest guidelines for hiring the right per- 
son? Can you help me Identify appro- 
priate candidates? 

•Do I need a credit policy? What 
should It cover and how should I set It 
up? 

•How much Is my business worth? 
Can you help me with a professional 
valuation, 



h. 




oven ant 



ortgage 





orporation 

4 

Loan Officer Team: 

Gene Z. Kubiak Valerie Linehan 
708-379-2653 708-379-2652 

Niche Products Available Include: 

•Self Employed No Income Verification Loans *No Condo Presak Requirements 

•Same Day Loan Approval •Float Down Rate Protection 

•Extended Locks Up To 260 Days •lot Loans & Construction to End Loans 

•Community Homebuyers and Affordable Housing Programs 

•FHA and VA Insured Loans •B, C, andD Credit Loans 

CALL US WITH YOUR EVERY MORTGAGE NEED £> 

Covenant Mortgage Corporation is to «pd opportunity housing lender. An Minoii Resiacnli il Mortgage licence! ' ■ ^5* 



HOMETOWN ATTENTION: 

for your 

HOME IMPROVEMENT NEEDS 

Let Us Help You With a 

HOME EQUITY 
CREDIT LINE 

Use it as you need it, for a boat, 
car, college expenses, a lawn 
mower or a pool . 



Or A... 





HOME 

Improvement Loan 

Convenient Low Cost Monthly Payments, 
Room Additions, Baths, Kitchens, Decks, etc. 



In Aiitioch, Bill Battistone at 395-6822 

* 

•Mortgage Loans Available 
SEE or CALL Bill Russell, Jim Gitzlaflf at 244-6000 

For HOMETOWN ATTENTION, »'. 70m- HOMETOWN BANKlt 

BANKofWAUKEGAN 

. . . has a heart 




Main Office 
1601 N. Lnrlt 

(708)2416000 



Member FDIC 



Weti Side Facility - 

Green Day Road at Grand Avenua 

(708)244-6000 

cAmndmon* 

Bank ol Waukagan, a wholly owned subsidiary ol Northern 
Slates Financial Corporation 



Antfoch Facility 
Routa 59 at Graai Lake Road 

(70S) 39S-6822 






You can lower the advertised APR on a 
car or truck loan as much as 1% by earning 
rate reductions. If you are in the market for 
a new 1995 or late model 1994 automobile, 
this is the time to buy. 

To find out how you qualify for a rate 
reduction, call or stop by one of our branch 
locations to speak with a Retail Lender to- 
day! Don't delay, how often can you get a 
loan under prime? 




*The current fixed rate as of 8/10/94 for new auto loans of 36 
months with rate reduction discounts, We will finance 90% of 
the manufacturer's suggested retail price. For example, on a 36 
month new auto loan of S10.000 at 6.50% APR, you would 
make 36 payments of $306.49. Limited time offer subject to 
change or withdrawal without notice. Rates are subject to 
change. Loan subject to application and credit approval. This 
offer available for new 1995 or late model 1994 automobiles 
only. Competitive rates are available for other model years and 
terms. This offer does not apply to third party loans or refinanc- 
ing. 



[Brand 

NATIONAL BANK 

"Your Community Bank. Together We 're Making A Difference. 



>i 



Waukegan, 2323 W. Grand Ave, 623-9000; Gurnee, 4840 Grand Ave., 244-6620; Hutchins, 7500 Grand Ave., 265-2100 

Lobby hours: Mon. - Thur. 9:00 a.rru - 4:00 p.m., Fit 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m., Sat 9:00 am. - 12 noon 



K«iK»:afa«**swEiiBies£MttaasMi 






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Know where to look for money 



Where and how to finance small 
business Is the key to beginning a new 

H business or to staving off bankruptcy. 

1 Thousands of existing businesses fall 
annually that might succeed If they 
could get a little financial breathing 
space. 

Richard D. Smith entrepreneur, pub- 
lisher and marketing consultant, found 
that the special knowledge that Is 
required to get and manage money for 
small businesses does not exist In any 
practical, easy-to-use form. So he 
researched and wrote a book, 
"Getting Money.' 

Material In this guide would require 
an Individual to read "hundreds of 



books and pamphlets) contact Innu- 
merable banks, lending Institutions and 
government offices and spend hours of 
research time," according to Smith. 

The methods In "Getting Money" 
have been proven and tested by hun- 
dreds of small businesses. Chapter one 
reviews 1 15 ideas for finding funds. 

"Getting Money" takes you from the 
beginning through the end of the most 
common methods of raising capital, 
with helpful hints at each step. 

To purchase the book, call 
1(800)355-9500; or mall a check or 
money order for $14.95 to "Getting 
Money," 4601 Elsenhower Ave., 
Alexandria VA 22304. 



Growing number of renters purchase insurance 



-j 



The number of people purchasing 
renters Insurance has Increased by 
more than 50 percent since 1989, 
according to the Insurance Information 
Institute (IID. 

In 1989, only 26 percent of renters 
had renters Insurance. Inl993, 41 per- 
cent had renters Insurance. These fig- 
ures came from a survey conducted by 
Cambridge Reports for the III. 

The largest Increase was among 
consumers with annual Incomes of 
$20,000 to $49,000, those 35 and under, 
and people IMng In the Northeast and 
South. 

Several factors may have con- 
tributed to the Increase, Including con- 
sumer awareness of the Importance of 
being adequately Insured, says the 111. 

Many people used to think 1hey 
were not at risk to suffer from a major 



disaster. But In the last few years, a 
record number of hurricanes, tornados, 
floods and violent storms have stuck 
communities throughout the country. 

The III also points out that crime Is 
another reason why people are pur- 
chasing renters Insurance. Many renters 
have sophisticated equipment such as 
stereo systems, computers and VCRs. 
These Items are expensive to replace. 

The III publishes a free brochure on 
renters Insurance called "Here Today, 
Gone Tomorrow." The brochure 
answers basic questions such as how to 
pick an agent, how to get the right 
amount of coverage and how to file a 
claim. 

Consumers Interested In a copy of 
the brochure or who have questions on 
renters Insurance should call 1(800)942- 
4242. 



You say you 

didn't win 

the Lottery? 

» 

We have 
plan B. 



Winning the Lottery is one way to make our dreams come true. Unfortunately 
everybody can't win, but we've got another idea - a loan from the Bank of 
Northern Illinois, N.A. See us about: 

Home mortgages Car loans Home equity loans 

Debt consolidation Student loans Home improvement loans. 

...and more! 

If you haven't won the Lottery and realize you're unlikely to, come talk to us 



about PLAN B. 



^ 



Your 

community loidrr 

sinct 1852 



Bank of Northern Illinois, N.A. 

Waukegan ♦ Gurnee ♦ Libertyvilte ♦ Lake Bluff 
708/623-3800 



UtvtmfDC 



fi 



FIRST 1TIML 



■ 

1 1 







EMPLOYEE OWNED 

The First National Bank ofAntiach is pleased 
to announce the following promotion: 




Jeanette Stahl has been promoted to an 
Administrative Assistant at our Gurnee facility. 
Jeanette has been working as our New Accounts 
Representative and Secretary for the Branch 
Manager since August of 1993. Jeanette will con- 
tinue to service our customers in Gurnee by 
opening new accounts in additional to her admin- 
istrative duties. 

Jeanette resides in McHenry with her husband 
Chuck. 

We are more than tellers, personal bankers, 
secretaries and officers. 

We are owners... 

On May 25, 1994, our Employee Stock 
Ownership Plan purchased majority 
interest in our Bank. 

We are owners, we care. 

ASK US ABOUT ... . M&nner. 

Common Sense Checking EAGLE 50 




36044 N. Brookslde Di 

Gurnee, IL 60031 

(708) 6626644 



485 Lake Street 

Anlloch, IL 60002 

(708)395-3111 






■■i 



i 






i 




SfpnMbEii 10, 1 994 bikctANd NewspApcis BANK/FINANCE 



E 9 

■ 




Smart ways to borrow money 



Carrying high credit card charges 
from month to month Is one of the most 
expensive! ways to borrow money. The 
Illinois. CPA Society says that there are 
smarter ways to borrow money that will 
keep Interest costs to a minimum and 
allow you to pay off your debts faster. 
The options available vary depending 
on how you plan to use the funds, how 
much you plan to borrow, and for how 
long.. 
Home-aqufty loans 

If you've been haphazardly racking 
up credit card charges, you can con- 
solidate your debt by taking out a 
home-equity loan. You can usually bor- 
row up to 80 percent of your home's 
value, minus the balance on your mort- 
gage. With Interest rates on mortgage 
loans averaging about half that of 
credit card rates, a home-equity loan 
may save you thousands of dollars. 

In addition. If you Itemize on your tax 
return, you may also be able to deduct, 
the Interest on up to $100,000 of home- 
equity Indebtedness, 
Credit unions . 

Credit unions provide a number of 
consumer credit, services, Including, 
home-equity, automobile and personal 
loans. Their loan services are restricted 
to credit union members who borrow 
money from a pool of funds, comprised 
In part of money deposited by all of the 
credit union's members. If you're a 
credit union member and need a loaa 
you will most likely obtain a more favor- 
able rate by taking the loan from your 
credit union than by borrowing for a 



:Vllii0H» 



t a 



local bank. 
40l(k) plans 

If you. participate In a qualified 
retirement plan, such as a 401 (k) plan, 
you can borrow against your Invest- 
ment. Generally loans must be repaid 
within Ave years and there are limits on 
how much you can borrow. The bene- 
fits: The Interest rate Is usually one per- 
centage point above prime— which Is 
lower than the Interest. rate on most 
other forms of credit—and your Interest 
payments go Into your own account. 
Insurance policial 

Certain types of Insurance policies 
can be used as security to borrow from 
Insurance companies. For example. If 
you own a whole Hfe policy, you can 
borrow against the cash-value of the 
policy. 

The Interest rate will generally be 
lower than that charged by lending 
Institutions. In fact, the Interest rate on 
loans of older policies can be as low as 
5 percent. What's more, you do not 
need to repay the loan. However, In 
most Instances, it will be beneficial to 
do so. That's because the amount bor- 
rowed Is deducted from the death ben- 
efit. Also, until the ban Is repaid, your 
death benefit grows more slowly. 
. Government loans 

Federal and state governments can 
be a source of tow Interest loans for 
special purposes, such as financing a 
student's higher education costs or the 
start-up of a small business. The Interest 
rates on government loans are usually 
lower than current market rates. 



SOME 

THINGS 

ARE 

IRRESISTABLE 




That includes our 
Certificate of Deposit Rates! 

ANNUAL 
TERM PERCENTAGE YIELD 

5yr. 6.697% 

4yr. . 6.168% 

3yr. 5.904% 

2yr. 5.693% 

1 yr. 5.378% 

6 mo. 5.116% 



MINIMUM 

TO OPEN 

$1,000 



Rates effective Oct. 1, 1994 and subject to change. Interest penalty Is required for early with: , 
drawal. Each depositor Insured to $100,000 by the National Share Insurance Fund, an 

Agency of the U.S. Government. 

With a minimum deposit of $1,000, our Certificates of Deposit are affordable to most everyone.. 
Anyone can put some money away to save, but building financial security takes smart planning. Put 
yourself in control of your financial future by taking advantage of these irresistabie rates, act todayl 



Warren-Newport 



CREDIT 

UNION 



»i r .*H rv 






1868 E. Bel videre Rd. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

^ 223-0028 

M \» ' Full family membership is open to those who live or woik in Warren, Newport 
and Avon Townships and any employee of any school in Lake County and select employee groups 



1313SkokieHwy. 
Gurnee, IL 60031 

662-2050 




Seyenbig 

reasons to 

invest with 

Edward D. Jones 

&Co. 



1. U.S. Government Guaranteed Bonds. 7.66% 

Guaranteed as to timely payment of principal and interest 



CONTACT THE EDWARD D. JONES INVESTMENT 
REPRESENTATIVE NEAR YOU!! 








Bob Friederich ' 

48 8. Old Rand Rd. Ste. 103 

Lake Zurich 

(708) 438-5359 



Mire Lubkeman 

434Lak«St,Anttoch 

(706) 395-5444 



2. Federal Income Tax-free 
Municipal Bonds. 

Interest may be subject to state and local taxci. 



6.30% 



3. Investment Grade Corporate Bonds. 8.45% 

4. Federally Insured Certificates APY 5.869%** 

Of DepOSit. Simple lateral 6.6% 

CD's available from institutions nationwide, 
Issuer information available on request. Subject to 
availability May bo subject to interest penalty Tor 

early withdrawal. "6000 minimum 5 year. 

5. Insured Income Tax-free 6.26%* 
Municipal Bonds. 

Interest on these bonds may be subject to state and local taxes. 

6. IRAs and Retirement Plans. 8.45%* 

Based on A- rated corporate bonds. 

7. Mutual Funds 

ProfesionaUy Managed And Diversified 



♦Rate expressed as the lower of yield to 
maturity or yield to call effective 9/27/94. 
Subject to availablity. Market risk is a 
consideration on investment sold prior to 
maturity. 

**Annual Percentage Yield. 




Jay Norman 

111 N. County, Waukefan 

(708)263-1188 



■; -.? •<>"''*;*',:""• 





Noah Seidenberg 

229 Center St, Grayslake 
(708) 223-1908 



B Edward D. Jones & Co. 9 

tfmtm N*m Yoiti Stoc* Cuftwgt, Inc. and SkuMm InvMlar Ptmcton CwpmMto 



Robert T. Schacner 
347 N. Milwaukee, LibertyvQle 

(708) 367-4240 



WE OWN AND 
OFFER 

TVA 

TENNESSEE 

VALLEY 

AUTHORITY 

POWER BONDS 

8.40% 

! 

DUE 07/15/34 

A State and local tax free 
AAaa rated by Moody's 
A Call protection through 7/15/99 
A Government agency 



*Rate expressed as the lower of yield to 
maturity or yield to call effective 9/27/94. 
Subject to availablity. Market risk is a 
consideration on investment sold prior to 
maturity. 



■ 



p 



BANK/FINANCE UkclANd, Newspapers Stp«Mb«i 70,199.4. 





WW4 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Financial checklist: 

Evaluating investment portfolios 

Some people create Investment portfolios the same 
way they approach buying furniture. After a few years 
and a couple of moves they realize they have a house 
full of chairs, sofas and end tables, but nothing match-' 
es or seems to fit. The furniture they've collected over 
the years becomes Inappropriate for their current 

* lifestyle. 

The same thing can happen when building an 
Investment portfolio. Over time, financial conditions 
and goats can change, making the allocation of assets 
In a portfolio Inappropriate for the person's current sit- 
uation. , 

The following are steps Investors should consider 
when reviewing their portfolios: 
l Step 1. Going for the goal. Re-evaluate savings and 
investment goals. The most common financial goals 
are saving for retirement, a child's education or a 
home. Try to estimate the future costs associated with 
these goals and the amount of time needed to save 
the money. Before putting aside money for goals, cre- 
ate a separate emergency fund In case of a Job loss or 
medical expenses. 

, Step 2. Made to measure. Based on what you know 
about your financial situation, goals, tolerance for risk 
and time horizon, devise an appropriate asset alloca- 
tion for your portfolio. Asset allocation Is the strategic 
diversification of Investments across asset classes such 
as stocks, bonds and cash. 

• Step 3. Old vs. now. Compare the asset allocation of 
the newly devised portfolio with the make-up of your 
existing portfolio. This comparison will help determine If 
one Is being too aggressive or conservative with Invest- ' 
ments. 

Step 4. Reality check. Investors must have realistic 
expectations about how much they can save and the 
probable return on money Invested. If you make $2,000 
a month and your savings plan calls for you to set aside 
$1,500 each paycheck, you'll .probably -fall short- of 
your goal. 

Stop 5. Avoiding ttie tax bite. Consider how tax- 
advantaged Investments fit In your portfolio. People 
who participate In 401 (k) plans can set aside pre-tax 
plans can set aside pre-tax dollars for retirement. If not 
covered by a company pension plan, your $2,000 IRA 
contribution Is still tax deductible. Annuities and special 
retirement plans for the self-employed also offer tax 
benefits. 

Step 6. Further refinement. An Investment risk can be 
managed further by diversifying within each asset 
class, if you determine that 60 percent of your portfolio 
should be in equities, consider spreading this portion of 
your Investments over several different stock funds. This 
extra level of diversification give protection from the 
Inevitable fluctuations of Individual stocks and stock 
mutual funds. 

Step 7. Back In balance. Regularly check your tar- 
get asset allocation and re-balance accordingly. 
Rebalancing allows maintenance of the desired risk 
tolerance level. Most experts say Investors must review 
their portfolios at least once a year or when faced with 
goal and/or lifestyle changes. 



As the credttcard statements begin pouring In, 

many consumers realized they weren'tids thrifty as h 
ithey had thought Citibank MastejCard and Visa & 
l^endlnglts ongoing Invitation to consumers to 

write for Its tt ee financial education booklets. 

:\ Written by expert financial plahners, each 
|fc>ooklet addresses flndrrclal concerns fa^ a spe- 
cific group:^c>catk3^prid h^h school students, 
twomen, newlyweds; college stuo^hts'ahB those In 
Icredlt crisis. Additionally/^ a, booklet b available for v 
Itriose Interested In learning how to protect Ihem- 

selves from financial fraud. Thebobklets are enti- 
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*>Money Mdtferslfor VbungAdults 



►Money Matters for Newlyweds 



X-ji-i 



m. .Max More/ Detective in Mdne^ttnta 
;©^detoil?er5onal;Money Manaf 



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IfCbplhQWlth^Gredlt Crtefe 



Facing Hnarctal Fraud; Ne 




Jjafegugrdi 

W% Anyone wishing to receive a copy oflbrWorl 
rnore of these free booklets should send a postcard 
IpplccitlnQ theTKime of the b^k<is);rat;K(^kSg 
^xir RhdrBld|lBc*dnca Otlbdh^ : Processing Centett 

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First Time Home Buyers 

The Homestart Program Can 
Make Your Dreams Come True! 



■• ••• • .••■■ 



•:•: ?•*•;•:•>;■!•>:*: 



?^T' • ' •: : • : ■ wm^ v VKfy 



THIS IS:AM AffORDABLE 

MORTGAGE FEM1RD1G: 



HAVE 3% OF OWN MONEY (DOWN PAYMENT) 



mm 



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John Hansen Nathan Johnston 



mmsm \Mmmm 

RATIOS 33/28 

m cash wmm retimed 

AT CLOSING, RESULUNC IN lOWHt CLOSING COSTS 

•((MTOIOWI LOW 

CALL US NOW 

TO GET MOM DETAILS 




Kim Presley Tom O'Connor 




,-.V.VAV.V,-.V.WAV 



Ray Georges 



Alain Oiler 



LAKE COUNTY'S 
MORTGAGE SPECIALISTS 



i 



Now Celebrating Our 75th Year! 



FIRST FEDERAL BANK, § 

Wholly Owned Subsidiary, Northern States Financial Corporation 



Apply At Our Lending Office 

* 

5384 Grand Avenue 

Gurnee 
or call 

(708) 249-6312 




MAIN OFFICE 

Madison at County St. 

Waukegan, IL 60085 

(708) 623-0084 



LEWIS AVE. OFFICE 

1428 North Lewis 

Waukegan, IL 60085 

(708)249-6307 



GURNEE OFFICE 

5384 Grand Avenue 

Gurnee, IL 60031 

(708/249-6312 



&**** 




-l-..-***** 



r i C ' ■ ■ * * " **■ ->-* 5 



«if.*«>.'i^.i -Jkl-^A.Vp '- 



*l ^• t +»*-*jV— »•**«•*•■•* 



si&f .i-b'A ^,-1^4 ' <m^m^^s»mmmE. 




— — 



i 




Lakeland 

Newapapen 



Considering investment alternatives 




People who Invest 
In CDs are realizing 
that rates Just aren't * 
what they used to 
. be. As CDs mature, 
or when they look at 
Investing their retire- 
ment lump sum dis- 
tribution, the reality 
that rates are lower 
than they have been In several years 
hits Investors hard. 

People are seeking alternative 
Investments In greater and greater 
numbers. This diversification may not 
only Increase their yields, but can add 
• positive long-term dimensions to their 
Investment programs. 

Here are some options for people to 
consider: - 

1 , Stretch out the time frame of Ihe 
Investments. Many people keep their 
money In maturities of one year or less. 
By spreading their Investments over dif- 
ferent time lengths, money comes, 
available for reinvestment on different 
dates. This limits the risk of having to 
take what you can get when all your 
money comes due at once. 

2. Look Into annuities. Annuity con- 
tracts are popular alternatives to CDs, 
When you purchase an annuity, the 
money Is deposited with an Insurance 
company. During the "buildup phase," 

t the money collects Interest at competl-: 
tlve rates— In many cases, one or two 



percentage points higher than CDs. 
During the "payout phase," the Insur- 
ance" company makes regular pay- 
ments to the Investor, while the remain- 
ing balance continues to earn Interest 

3. Consider bond funds.' Unlike CDs, 
the value of the money Invested In 
bond funds can go up and down over 
time. Bond funds can hold short. Inter- 
mediate or long-term Investments and 
can also be, found in high, medium or 
low-grade quality. While you must 
select carefully and be sure to read the 
prospectus before Investing, bond 
funds, can Increase yields and diversify 
one's Investments. 

4. Look Into stock funds. Financial 
professionals generally say equities 
should be a part of most Investment 
portfolios. While prices can be volatile, 
over time the stock maricet has aver- 
aged an annual return of approximate- 
ly 10 percent. Use assets you don't 
expect to need for the next few years, 
and use tested techniques such as dol- 

, lar cost averaging Into stock funds to 
make these Investments. 

Editor's note: Submitted by Pat Pernio 
CLU, ChFC, Plan America®, a service of 
CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc., 5910 
Mineral Point Rd.. Madison, Wl 53705, 
MemberNASD, SiPC. Plan America rep- 
resentatives are licensed insurance rep- 
resentatives of Century life of America, 
an affiliate of the CUNA Mutual 
Insurance Group. 





HERE TO SERVE YOU 




Robert Wegge, Enrolled Agent; Laura Smock, CPA; 
Linda Slipke, Accounting Manager; Mary Wegge, 
. . Office Manager; Chris Wismcr, Computer Supervisor 

Robert K. Wegge, Ltd. 

Established 1960 

•Income Taxes 
•Accounting Service 

•Estate Planning 

•Business Plans 
•Computer Support 

265 Center St •• Grayslake 

(708)223-0777 



Annual 
Percentage Yield 



SAVINGS 



Regular Savings 3.15% 



CHECKING 



HOMETOWN Checking* 

to s 2,499.99 2.80% 

to. l 9 1 999.99 2.90 

•10,000 and over 3.00 
MONEY MARKETING 
Checking* 

to '9,999.99 a05 

to '24,999.99 : 3.10 

•25,000 and over 3.20 



HURRY! \ 

Ratesthis 

special 
wont last 
long J 



Stop In & 

See Us Or 
Call For n 
More 
Details 





Annual : 
Percentage Yield 


1 CDs ! 


1 Month CD 


3.75% 


3 Month CD 


4.25 


6 Month CD 


4.50 


1 Year CD 


5.00 


2 Year CD 


5.35 



3 Year CD 



5.75 



Rates subject to change without notice 




Libertyville Bank 

A branch of Richmond Bank 

1509 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville, IL 60048 

708/680-1077 (=1 



nm 



OpporttfriiM 



Manage All Your Money 

With Your 
Personal Computer 

Citibank on the Personal Computer combines the 
resources of Citibank with the power of your computer to 
let you bank day or night, weekday or Weekend, right at 
home. 



Pay your bills 

Review your account activity - up to 60 day transac- 
tion history 
Transfer funds 

Download into popular money management soft- 
ware packages . 
Get unlimited FREE stock quotes 






Securities are not obligations of or guaranteed by 
Citibank or Citicorp Investment Services, are not 
bank deposits or FDIC insured and involve risk 
to principal. 



Buy and sell securities 



Citibank • Vernon Hills 

700 North Milwaukee 
708-816-8246 . 



fit 



© 1*394 CITIBANK. F.S.B FDIC INSURED 



5g -:-...- ._ 



»M*- - f^ife^l » **** »»**» ■ 



•«? 




HEALTHWATCH UkEUNd Newspapers ScprcNbui *0,1**4 



I 



l : 



■^ 



Vic Fou\ Mi moriaI 
Hospii\! 



■ Cocaine anonymous 

: Support group meets 
every Saturday at 7:30 p.m. 
Call 360-4090 For lnforma- ; 
tion. 

Living With loss 

Support group meets the 
second; and fourth Tuesday 
.of each month at 7 n;m. with 
leadership ' by Chaplain i 
George Frankc. No^.Chargc. 
Call ; , . -360-4014 for Informa- 
tion. 

MS support group 

Meets ? the second 
Tuesday of each month from 
7 to 9 pirn, at St. Patrick's 
Church, 15000 Wadsworth 
Rd., 3 Wadsworth. 'i Call 662- 
0531.; 

Pulmonary rehab 

% Provides services for . 
adults with pulmonary prob- 
lems such as COPD, asthma, 

bronchitis and emphysema. 
Call 360-4220. 

i ' •. -■■■.• ;■ & \ 

Asthma -wl se 

-Meets evenings and 
Saturdays to help asthma 
patients Jive with their dis- 
ease. Classes are available for 
adults, children and parents 
of asthmatic patients. Call 
360-4220 to register. 

Mental health 

Confidential assistance is 
available for mental health 
problems by calling 360-4082 
and for chemical dependen- 
cy problems by calling 608- 
HELP. 



St. IIiirisi MrcficAl 
Center 



Grief support group 

Meets the first Thursday 
of each month from 11 a.m. 
to 12:30 p.m. and also from 5 
to 7 p. rh. .;. The group al so 
meets the third Thursday of 
the month from 1 1 am; to 
12:30 p.m. and again from 7 
to 9 p.m. Call 360-2259, 



} 



L- 



Offered the first Wednes- 
day of each month in the 
center lobby from 11 a.m. to 
2 p.m. and every Friday at 
the Saint Theresc Area 
Treatment Satcll itc, Lake 
Villa from noon to 3 p.m. 
This service is free. Call 244- 

Hospice services 

; Hospice services arc 
available through ' Saint 
Therese Medical Center, 

,360-2220. The program pro- 
vides nurses, aides for per- 
sonal care, social work ser- 
vices and bereavement ,ser- v ; 

.vices..;';.'::..;-:. ■';]■"/ 

Early learning center 

Saint Theresc offers day 
care to community residents. 
It can serve 70 children from 
6 weeks through 6 years. It is 
open daily from 6:30 a.m. to 
5:30 p.m. For niore inibrma- 
tion call the Early Learning 
Center at 360-2733. 



Home health care 

Home health care services 
are available. Costs may be 

;^ covered by Medicare, 
Medicaid and; most; insur- 

ylahce ■ programs. Call 360; 

^2ttb; : ': : 



October is domestic violence awareness month 



' A Safe Place/Lake County 
Crisis Center, the Lake County 
shelter and counseling program 
for victims of domestic violence, 
will hold its second annual 
Candle Lighting Ceremony at 5 
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6, on the east 
steps of the Lake County Court 
House, 10 N. County St., 
Waukegan. 

The ceremony was organized to 
increase awareness during 
October, Domestic Violence 
Awareness Month, of a crime that 
invades homes, ruins lives and kills 
women and children. The lit can- 
dles will symbolize the renewed 
commitment by A Safe Place to 
help victims become survivors and 
work toward an end to violence. 



Research shows that half of all 
women experience some form of 
violence from their partners dur- 
ing marriage; more than one- 
third of these women arc bat- 
tered repeatedly every year; and 
70 percent of men who abuse 
their female partners also abuse 
their children. 

T-shirt art hanging outside the 
court house during the candle 
lighting portrays the pain, fear 
and hopes of these victims. The 
shirts were created by abused 
women and their children who 
arc clients of A Safe Place. 

Speakers at the ceremony will 
be Lake County State's Atty. 
Michael Waller, Circuit Court 
Associate Judge Victoria' A. 



Rossetti of Domestic Violence 
Court, A Safe Place executive 
director Phyllis DcMott and sur- 
vivors of abuse who found safety, 
counseling and courage to start 
their lives anew at A Safe Place, 



The public is urged to light a 
candle with A Safe Place friends 
and supporters to remember and 
recognize victims of domestic 
violence. For Information call A 
Safe Place at 249-5147. 



'Cool suit' aids MS patients 



Officials from the Multiple 
Sclerosis Assn. of America and 
the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration have 
signed an historic 'Memorandum 
of Understanding' which 
expands cooperative efforts to 
develop assistive technology for 
the physically disabled. 

MSAA currently utilizes NASA 



spin-off technology, known as 
microclimate cooling, to assist 
thousands of MS patients who 
suffer from heat stress. According 
to research reports, patients 
.wearing a lightweight vest, 
dubbed a 'cool suit', experience 
improvements with their speech, 
fatigue, and other symptoms 
associated with the disease. 





Newspapers 



■ 



i 



• 



'■ 



■ ■ ■ . ■ 



■ *->;ff'mV-»wtV' ,: 



Truth is fleeting in health reform debate 



Throughout the health care 
reform debate the cost of paying 
for universal coverage and rich 
health benefits packages has been 
hidden in employer mandates, 
proposed cuts in Medicare pay- 
ments and premium taxes. The 
latest health care reform propos- 
als in the Senate and the House 
arc more of the same. They shift 
the costs around and try to dis- 
guise inadequate revenue sources 
as something other than what 
they are, taxes. 

. It's way past the time to play it 
straight with the American peo- 
ple. Americans understand the 
concept of "no free lunch" and are 
capable of making decisions when 
presented with the facts. Surveys 
have shown that Americans sup- 
port universal health insurance 
coverage and arc willing to pay a 
reasonable cost to achieve it. 
What's required now is the effort 
to make that cost reasonable and 
to be clear about how it will be 
paid. 

Unfortunately, there arc some 
in Congress who prefer to play 

CFC campaign 
kicking off 

Federal and military employ- 
ees can contribute to their choice 
of charities through payroll 
deduction when the annual 
Combined Federal Campaign 
(CFC) begins this month. 

The campaign, which runs 
September through November, is 
open to Federal Government and 
military employees nationwide 
and- overseas - -Last year's CFC 
raised more than $200 million. 

The City of Hope National 
Medical Center and its Bcckman 
Research Institute, located in 
Duartc, California, is renowned 
for its treatment and research to 
combat leukemia and other 
forms of cancer, diabetes and 
Tourette Syndrome. While more 
than 90 percent of all City of 
Hope patients arc treated for 
some type of malignant disease, 
active research is also underway 
to address Alzheimer's disease, 
AIDS and a number of genetic 
and hereditary disorders. 

For more information, call. 
City of Hope at (800)220-0518. 



games, creating hidden taxes 
which still fall far short of offset- 
ting the expenses found in their 
grandiose plans. 

No matter one's opinion of 
employer mandates, Americans 
should be told that having 
employers foot 50 or 80 percent 
of health insurance premiums is 
not without cost. Employers must 
cover that expense by reducing 
wages, eliminating jobs, increas- 
ing prices or a combination of all 
these things. In the end, workers 
and consumers will pay. 

Cutting Medicare payments 
to hospitals and physicians is 
another proposed tactic for pay- 
ing the health care reform tab. It's 
another hidden tax. Providers 
make up their underpayment for 
Medicare patients by overcharg- 
ing those with private insurance. 
Insurers, in turn, arc forced to 
increase premiums in response 
to this cost shifting, This has been 
going on for years, but it's certain 
to get worse with additional 
Medicare cuts. Americans pay the 
cost whether they realize it or not 



Premium taxes and taxes on 
self-funded plans arc more exam- 
ples of making people think 
someone else is paying the health 
care bill. They arc correctly 
labeled as taxes, but the taxpayer 
is mlsidenuficd. There is little 
doubt that such taxes would be 
passed along to consumers. 

What is required in the health 
care debate is a large dose of real- 
ity. Americans must be told the 
truth about costs. Lawmakers 
must stop hiding the tax bean 
under one shell or another. They 
must propose straightforward 
revenue sources. Simply put: a 
broad-based tax may be the 



answer. It has worked for 
Medicare and Social Security. 

Once Americans know, the 
facts, they can let their Senators 
and Congressmen know whether 
they want to pay additional taxes 
for universal coverage, and, if so, 
how much. 

Truth in taxation must be an 
clement of any health care reform 
legislation. 

Editor's note: Copy submit- 
ted by J.E.D. and Associates, Inc., 
20 Lloyd Stt, Gary, 111. for Richard 
F. O'ConncIl, vice president, Blue 
Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois. 
Call (312)938-6352 for further 
details. ~* .■■■■• 



Saint Therese honors employee 

A golden anniversary' celebration is just around the comer for an 
employee of Saint Therese Medical Center, Waukegan. Bernadctte 
Schultz will be honored by fellow employees at the medical center for 
her 50 years of service at a formal tea to be held on September 30, 

Schultz started at Saint Therese in September of 1944 by working part-time 
in the medical cent er*s dietary department Two years later she transferred to 
the laboratory, where she is now secretary for the pathology department 

Schultz said, "I have truly enjoyed the family atmosphere and being 
in the medical field," she said. "It's hard to imagine that when I started 
World War II was going on, and that Franklin Roosevelt was president" 




Birthday threads 

Diana Strasburg (left), Senior Passport Coordinator, and Shirley Paulk, an EHS Good Shepherd 
Hospilal volunteer, look over some of the quilt squares that have been created for the hospi- 
tal's 15th birthday commemorative qiillt. The completed quilt will be unveiled during the hos- 
pital's 15th birthday festivities Oct, 17. 





Stjmmbrt'50, 1.-994 b\k£lANd NEWspApf its ' HEAtTHWATCH 



■■rX^XSSSSE^OSm 



C ONth II Ml (Hi *1 
C-l Ml U 



Caregivers support 

Condell Me flcaj Center's; 
Caregivers ^Support Group \ 
will meet/at 7 p. ml, the fourth 
Tuesday of every v month at? 
the AUcn C^ndeU:Day<Jejater; 
forjlntergene rational, Gare in 
UbertyviUe^Anyone^fiid is > 
responsjibleibr giving care to 
elderly, 1 infirm; or disabled 
family members? are" invited; 

WeNcfKlEschOiri 

support groupji for people 
wi^ch^iclfe£^& 
farm1ies^7:30lp; * 
AUcn CohTerehW? 
ConaeU L 'Meaical:-'ijentef' : tii'- ;: ~'' : '''^''. : v} > 

■thei;^^ ■ : ;: 18ii8$3 

:68(KIl 



Wednesday, Oct 12. Pro- 
grains will be presented ftoclf ; 
7:30 to9)pjn: through Nov. 
16ihthe Prairie Room atEHS 
Good ShcphoroS Hospp; 
Registration is required. Call 
^800r474-3278; 

fluent ion series 

Wellspring Women's 
Healm^reiezSNi'Queriun 
Rd;, Palatini has scheduled aHi 
'scries of education programs '• 
in Octoberi ^fc»r ' WoSflffiH 

olkies-wmbelteCSr 



; ipatior^^j362iMd5g«| 
5773ibi mformation.; 



Si. IIii m m Mi <■ I i c \l 

L t Ml R 



ChUdblrthtime* 



M6hdkyM ; .Oc^f i - - : . . 
GoodShephcrdHospltBi.F 



more 



irsday, 
:P.iiL> at : t DfaDetes cii 



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es 'wiU -begin on Thursday, W 
Oct? 6i^rB|^'9:p.mlaV' ||HL 

. Saln«Tj^^^Medical v' i: Gooo^nef fiSHQ 
Center This is the first tlais ./ ,.ff.« f^i ^^ntKlu'HI 



Centenvnusuthernmtlais oft^rs m» mon^ oUabe 

• in aAflye;rpart:|sesston^forj 



now 



which a ^nbmirial feetwitilliet 
charged. Registration Is rer , 
quired For more hifornia- 
tion or to register call ASK-A- 
NURSE at 244-5900, 

" 'SS«S5-- l V > '■ ■•' : •■'''''' 



^m*i 



Hospit t of ill 
NOmli Show 



Open house 

The public ^ is inyited to 
learn "more "about hospice- 
% care|>vhen^ Hospice of ^the 
North Shore hosts their first 
"C^mmuhityConversatiohs" 
at their' I^e^ County office; 
118 W; Lake^St, Ubertyville, 
on Wednesday/ Oct. 5 at 7 
p.m. Nov reservations ?ar£ 
necessary. Call 467-7423 for 
dctiiils^u^S^^ ■ 



1HS Good 

Sin plu ihI Hospital 



'Walk to Remember* 

I The RTS Bereavement 

Services at EHS Good 

Shepherd; Hospital will host 

its^lrd annual Walk to 

Remember* on thehospltal 

grounds at 2 priL Sunday, 

Oct' 2; The walk is dedicated 

Ito rthe approximately 777i000 

; babies in thefU.S> who die 

eacfr year at .birth or before 

reaching term;; Reservations 

are required For more Infor- 

; niartion or to sign? up,< call 

1381^23; extf 5520 f 



' $. ■: ■"-{ " 



■v-\?-?-: : 



4: -':;-: 




Shepherd'sIHe 



part Cardiovascular Edu 



M:h 



tion Series beginning 



: . uon -. aenes:cfe^p*?Ki'i'i'»* i 




i >S^S'S¥J 



/classes' ^sjmhso're^^by 
AmeHcarrjDiabetes^. 

: ^lTi;:lRb1e1o'f>Exlrls^^ 
Diabetes Management wl 
;be^dlscuismia^||^^ 
;Kf6nda^bct^lp/ Jn^ttie 
Meadow Room of the hospi- 
tal/ CaU 381 ^0123, ext ' 55^r 
for details. 

Medicare counseling 

Diabetic screening ' ser- * 

; vices^ along with blood pres- 
sure r testing, wilf be offered 

;by Good Shejfmerd Thursday, 
Oct 13 at the Algonquin Fire 
Protection Building, 302 N; 

rHarrison^;^Alg6nquJn;^^e 
free ^screenings will be held 
from 8,30 to 10:30 a.m.No3 

cappiomtments are required. % 
Medicare counseling will 
also'be available. ^ Walkirins, 
are ; welcome or apjpblntrj 
ments can be made by call- - 
ing 381^0123; ext^ 5441y or] 
382-7277, Medicare counsel- 

t irig ; will Valsb be provided 
from 9 to 11 a.m. Thursday, 
Oct. 6 at Wellspring Wom- 
en's Health Care, 825 N. 
'Quentin Rd i; Palatine. , 



CCfA 

Foi\d»Mio\ 



CCFA services 

The Crohn's & Colitis 
Foundation of America, Inc. 
XCCFAlr offers educational 
and support services . to 
patients, their families) 
heal tneare profes s lorials and 
idhie; geheral^puHIc, ^mJJlu? 
nrntionarxsut support ser- 
vices in Lake County? caUuie 



IOlnbto Carol Fisher 

of the CCFA at 808-7480^^ 



Special party for EHS-born babie 





Were you or someone in your 
family born at EHS Good 
Shepherd Hospital? 

If you are one of more than 
22,000 babies who were delivered 
at EHS Good Shepherd since 
1979, you're invited to participate 
in a special birthday party, 
reunion and group photograph in 
honor of the hospital's 15th birth- 
day. 

The event will be held on the 
hospital grounds from 2 to 4 p.m. 
Sunday, Oct 16. The party will 
include everything from birthday 
cake, pony rides and games to a 
balloon launch with a prize going 
to the person whose balloon trav- 
els the farthest. In addition a 
group photograph of individuals 



born at the hospital will be taken 
at the reunion. - 

As a souvenir of the occasion, 
all EHS Good Shepherd "babies" 
who attend the party will receive 
free t-shirts commemorating the 



hospital's 15th birthday. 

Reservations for the reunion 
need to be made by Monday Oct- 
3. To RSVP, call EHS Good 
Shepherd's HcalthAdvisor line at 
1(800)474-3278. 



Walkathon Saturday October 1 

The Alliance for the Mentally 111 of Lake County Is proud to have 
the College of Lake County co-sponsor the second Annual Mental 
Awareness Walk In Lake County, Saturday, Octl. The 10K 
Awareness Walk will be held on the grounds of the college In 
Grayslake. Registration will start at 9:30 am Step off at 10 am 
Walkers who bring pre -payments of $250. or more in cash or checks 
to the Walk on October 1 will receive prizes the day of the walk. 
Top fund raisers will be awarded prizes after all pledges are collect- 
ed and will be invited to a special "thank you" party in December. 
Call AMI of Lake County at 249-1515 for further details. 



\i>' 





Finch University of Health Sciences/ 
The Chicago Medical School 

3353 Green Bay Road, North Chicago 



THE ROBERT R. McCORMICK 
UNIVERSITY CLINICS 

Lake County's University Group Practice 
PRIMARY CARE and SPECIALTY SERVICES 



FREE DEPRESSION SCREENING 

Thursday, October 6, 1994 

9:00-11:00 

Faculty Lounge 



THIS TEST COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE 

• Written Self-Test for Depression 

• Screening Interview with Mental Health Professional 

• Multimedia Educational Presentation 



. 



578-3330 



Victory Lakes... The Natural Choice. 

Victory Lakes provides family-centered, quality long-term care in a natural home-tike environment. 
We realize that when a loved one must separate from the family, it can be a difficult experience for everyone 
involved. At Victory Lakes, we try to make this transition a little easier by having open visiting hours and 
encouraging family and friends to stop by and join in our many resident activities and holiday gatherings. . 



Victory Lakes offers comfort, convenience, and concern. From the raised, outdoor flower beds for our 
wheelchair-bound gardeners to the cozy dining room to our in-house beauty parlor and colorful aviary 

to the sparkling clean living areas, loving care is evident everywhere. 



Come visit anytime. Meet our professional staff. Get to know 
firsthand what you can expect from a quality nursing home 
environment. 



We offer: 




• Long-Term Nursing Care 

• Rehabilitation/Medicare Unit - short term 

• Alzheimer's and Related Disorders Unit 

• Respite Care Program - overnight to 30 days 



Please call (708) 356-5900 for a tour. 



K \/vicTo 

VIS* 



Victory Lakes 
Continuing Care Center 



1 055 East Grand Avenue - Lindenhurst, 1L 

7 mtlet west of fit. 94 • Affiliated with Victory Memorial Hospital 



. .'- 



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STRICTLY SENIORS LAkclANd Newspapers ScprfMbci T0,1 994 



^Strictly for Seniors^, 



"\ 



Lakeland 

Newspapers > 



Questionnaire uncovers depression symptoms 



Have you felt miserable, "empty" or 
sad for at least two weeks? Do you lack 
Interest In activities you once found 
enjoyable? Are you having difficulty 
sleeping through the night? Or have 
you been sleeping too much? Have 
your eating habits changed? Are you 
uncharacteristically tired or Irritable? 

If you, or someone you know, 
answer "yes" to any of these questions. 
It may be a sign of depression. 
Depression Is an Illness for which more 
than 80 percent ofpatlents can be suc- 
cessfully treated, but nearly two thirds 
of the people with this disease never 
seek help, 

"The term 'depression' can be con- 
fusing because It used to describe a nor- 
mal mood as well as an Illness," says 



Linda Hale, patient care director of 
Mental Health Services at Victory Mem- 
orial Hospital. "We all feel depressed or 
blue from time to time; It Is a normal 
reaction to distressing events in our lives. 
But, If feelings of sadness are accompa- 
nied by feelings of hopelessness and 
helplessness or If they persist unrelieved 
for more than two weeks, they may be 
symptoms of depressive illness." 

Self-rating questionnaires which can 
help uncover symptoms of depression 
will be made available to participants 
at Victory Memorial Hospital's free 
Depression Screening Day, Thursday, 
Oct. 6. The questionnaires will be evalu- 
ated by mental health professionals, 
who will confidentially discuss the results 
with participants, and make approprl- 



Advanced technology erases years from ears 



While medical progress In areas such 
as cardiac care and organ transplants 
are making headlines, significant 
advances are being made In hearing 
healthcare as well.' 

Digital computer technology, for 
example, has had a major Impact on 
the size and effectiveness of hearing 
aids. Now smaller and more effective 
ihan ever, they are Inconspicuous yet 
can help enhance some of the hearing 
that most of us lose over the years. 

These tiny, In-the-canal models, simi- 
lar to the one worn by former President 
Reagan, can now be programmed with 



a computer called the PMC to help cor- 
rect an Individual's unique hearing loss. 

The computerized hearing aids have 
over three million adjustment possibili- 
ties, according to Laura Uddle, audlolo- 
glst for Siemens Hearing Instruments, 
Inc., the company that manufactured 
Reagan's aid and pioneered these 
advancements In models such as the 
UfeSound™ hearing aid. 

"It's similar to getting eyeglasses. The 

patient, together with his or her hearing 

health care professional, can select 

.those settings which provide the best 

hearing possible," she explains. 




On Medicare? 

if so, YOUR 

AUTO COVERAGE 

NEEDS UPDATING. 
A-1 FAMILY 

INSURANCE AGENCY 

MIKE PASIEWICZ 
(708) 395-6655 

ESTATE PLANNING BEGINS WITH PROPER INSURANCE 

COVERAGE THAT WILLS AND UVING TRUSTS DO 

NOT PROTECT. CALL FOR DETAILS TODAY!!! 

Serving Lake County Seniors for Over a Decade 

1-800-397-1221 Toil-Free 





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Please Call For An Appointment & Present Coupon For Discount 

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708/396-3280 



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Fox Lake, IL 60020 

708/587-6068 



ate recommendations. Victory's 
screening day also Includes an educa- 
tional seminar, "Unmasking Depression: 
Seeing Things In a Different Light." The 
seminar will discuss symptoms of 
depression, diagnosis and treatment. 

Victory has scheduled two sessions 
for this Important free community 



screening, The educational seminar will 
be held at 3 p.m. and again at 6 p.m. 
on Thursday, Oct. 6 at the hospital 1324 
N. Sheridan Rd. Depression screening 
Interviews with mental health profession- 
als will Immediately follow each seminar. 
To make an appointment for a confi- 
dential screening, call 1(800)843-2464. , 



Symptoiiis of depression 



People :: suffertng from depression may .experience/some or all of .these 
symptoms: ; 

•A depressed mood-sadnoss or "emptiness"— lasting at least two weeks 

•A decrease of (less; often) an Increase In appetite or weight ; 

•A disruption In normal sleep pattern 

• Feeling either agitated or slowed down 

•Loss Interest In usual activities 
. •Lossbf energy 
. -Feelings of Worlhlessness an guilt' 

•Difficulty ; thinking and concentrattng _ 

•Thoughts of death or suicide ; v . - 





0fe arte 9%xe 9b &e*tx> Q/o*i> 6o 

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708-381-5599 



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Sfptmbu T0,1 994 UkeUNd Newspapers STRI CTLY SENIORS | j^ 

- — rrr\ 



litStiiii for Seniors 3 ^, 



Lakeland 

Newspapen y 



People urged to save their sight and see an ophthalmologist 



Half of all blindness Is preventable, 
and blindness can come without warn- 
ing, no symptoms at all. The best way to 
make sure your eyes are healthy Is to 
have an examination by an ophthal- 
mologist, a medical eye doctor. 

Take this true/false quiz, and prepare 
to be surprised; 

Reading In dim light Is harmful to 
your eyes. 

False. Working on computers will not 
harm your eyes. However, you can 
develop eye strain or fatigue after 
working at a terminal for long periods of 
time, Just as you can from reading or 
doing other close work. Take regular 
breaks to look up or across the room. 
Looking at objects farther away usually 
relieves the strain on your eyes. 

If your vision blurs or your eyes tire 
easily, you should have your eyes 
examined by an ophthalmologist. 

Wearing the wrong kind of glasses 
hurts your eyes. 



False. While the correct glasses or" 

contacts help you see clearly, wearing 

a pair with the wrong lenses, or not 

. wearing glasses at all, will not physically 

damage your eyes. 

Children outgrow crossed of mis-' 
aligned eyes. 

False, Children do not outgrow 
crossed eyes. A child whose eyes are 
misaligned will develop poor vision In 
one eye, because the brain will "turn 
off" the misaligned or "lazy" eye. If 
caught early, crossed or misaligned 
eyes may be straightened by glasses, 
patching, eye ' drops or surgery, 
Children who appear to have mis- 
aligned eyes'should be examined by 
.an ophthalmologist. 

Eye trouble Is the cause of learning 
disabilities. 

False. There Is no scientific evidence 
that eye trouble causes learning disabil- 
ities, or that eye exercises cure learning 
problems. However, all children should 



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COUPON 

ATTENTION SENIORS! 

50% OFF ALL REPAIRS 

& REALIGNS 

THRU 1CV31/94 



COUPON 

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Free Oral Cancer 
Screenings 

thnil<W3U94 : 



T 
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Last year, residents of Hawthorn Lakes attended 48 
concerts and musicals, took part in 24 theme parties, 
participated In 52 educational programs, went on four 
extended travel trips, and walked 3,605 miles. 



s 



w 




They also flexed their way through 312 exercise classes. 

One- and two-bedroom rental apartments, 
with access to professional healthcare, a 
full-service restaurant, endless things to 
do, and countless friends to make. 
What a place! 



hAb 




Hawthorn Lakes 

OK LAKhi COUNTY 

An AeUveLlft* ftelliem«n( Community 

(708) 367-0166 



10 E. Hawthorn 



' 



* Vernon Hills « 




have, a complete medical eye exam to 
determine whether Ihey have a vision 
problem that may affect reading. 

Sitting close to the television can 
damage children's eyes. 

False. There b no evidence that this be- 
havior damages the eyes, and the habit 
usually disappears as children grow older. 

People who wear glasses should 
avoid reading fine print and doing 
detail work. 



False. You can use your eyes without 
fear of "wearing them out." ■ 
All eye doctors are the same. 
False. To become an ophthalmolo- 
gist (MD or osteopath) requires eight 
years of medlcalschool and hospital 
. training after'college. An ophthalmolo- 
gist |s a medical doctor qualified to pro- 
. vide all aspects of eye/care, Including 
vision care, diagnosis and treatment of 
eye diseases and surgery. 



Thei CATHOLIC 
CHARITIES 



TOLL FREE NUMBER 
1-800-942-3930 

708-546-5733 

708-662-0085 

FAX 708-546-7114 



OF THE ARCHDIOCCSC OF CHICAGO 



Senior Social Services 



• Education 
•Exercise 

• Recreation 
•Travel 

• Full-course meals 

• Home-delivered Meats 



•investigation of 
Elder Abuse/Neglect 

• Nursing Home Ombudsman 
•Employment Training 

& Placement 

• Information & Assistance 



•Outreach 
• Assessment 
•Case Management 
•Emergency Support 
•Shared Housing 
•Counseling 



Volunteers Always Needed And Welcome 

itift ffiSSU CATHOLIC CHARITIES 
* SS8T SENIOR SOCIAL SERVICES 

116 N. Lincoln Avenue, Round Lake, IL 60073 
Park Place: 414 8. Lewis Ave., Waukegan, IL 60085 



© 




*ca*rnn) 



Will I Outlive 
My Savings? 




.Have you ever asked yourself this question? 
Maybe you've never really thought about it. But 
these days you've got to make your savings work 
harder, and last longer than ever before. 

Ask yourself the question... 

then call us for the answers. 



cic 



Carlson Financial Consultants 



Call Toll Free: 1-800-909-0303 

or (708) 548-2222 



Affiliate: Ogilvic & Taylor Securities 



member NASD, SIPC 





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Sfl STRICTLY SENIORS LaIceIancI Newspapers ScpTEwbcn 50,1994 



S7*i 



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ANTIOCH 




Lakeland 

Newspapers . 



Eight reasons older adults eat poorly 



As Americans age, they face health 
threats from many areas. One often 
overlooked heallh threat Is malnutrition. 
The fact Is many older adults are not 
eating well, and Ihls puts their health at 
risk. 

"There are many factors that enter 
Into healthy eating habits and diets," 
sajd Sue Polltakls, chief dietitian at 
Victory Memorial Hospital. 

"When seniors don't eat properly, 
they can lack essential vitamins and 
nutrients, as well as the necessary fuel 
to energize the body. It fs Important that 
they have good nutrition because a 
person's Immune system Is affected 
dramatically by their nutritional status." 

Among the factors leading to poor 
nutrition In older adults are: depression; 
medications which reduce appetite 
and/or change the taste or smell sen-' 
satlons people experience; problems 
" with teeth, gums and dentures; cost of 
groceries; lack of social Interaction 
, which reduces the pleasure of eating; 
difficulty In feeding themselves 
because of arthritis and other handi- 
caps; Inability to travel to the grocery 
store- and carry groceries home; and 
boredom with cooking and eating 
alone. 

"Family and friends can often help 
older adults to safeguard their health 
by ensuring that they eat well. 
Sometimes the Interest shown In a 
person's eating habits ts all the Incen- 
tive someone needs to make them 
want to eat three good meals a 
day," said Polltakls. 



It may be Important to check on a 
person's eating habits, especially . at 
meal times. Create Interest In meal time 
by sharing a friendly lunch or dinner 
once a week. To make sure Ihe refriger- 
ator Is well stocked, offer to take a per- 
son grocery shopping or to do It for 
him/her. Encourage the person to 
become Involved In outside activities 
through church, the park district and 
local senior centers, Getting seniors 
Involved In a physical activity Is also crit- 
ical In helping to maintain muscle mass 
and helps stimulate their ap-petltes. 

"Often, seniors have limited physical 
activity due to arthritis, Joint pain or 
loneliness," said Polltakls. 

"Unfortunately, muscles that don't 
get used begin to shrink, making that 
person feel weaker, thus further weak- 
ening him or her and reducing the 
appetite." 

Polltakls stressed that any activity, as 
simple as walking or swimming, Is help- 
ful. Weight training designed for older 
adults Is also a good activity. 

If walking Is not appropriate, due to 
physical limitations, she suggests con- 
tacting the park district, YMCA and 
area senior centers to find senior exer- 
cise groups. 

The leaders of senior groups are 
trained to adequately Judge a person's 
abilities and can tailor activities for Indi- 
viduals. 

When concerned about the eating 
habits of an older adult, talk to him/her 
about It. Together you may be able to 
safeguard his/her health. 



Hillcrest Is Committed To 
Your Loved Ones Needs 



We Ve Grown 
Mgalnl 

OUR NEW 

WING IS 



OPEN 





•"W W p ^. m •Buutifalty Redicorated Rocms And Halls 

^rllLLCREST nursing center 

1740 North Circuit Drive ,,.-...- .... 
Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 (708) 54o-5oOU 



y 



Arroits Ronald Rimle & Roild Brandt 

Would Like To Help You In The Following Legal Areas: 

Estate Planning (Trusts, Wills, Living Wills, Powers of Attorney) 
Family Law (Child Custody, Divorce, Adoptions) . 
Real Estate Closings (It's best to contact us before you buy/sell property) 

Medicaid Advisement, Bankruptcy, 
Probate, Criminal Matters, Traffic Matters 

Office! 36871 N. Route 83, Lake Villa, IL 
Phone: 356-9905 . 



1 



M 



UBLIC LIBR 
57 N. Main 
t intio.ch, IL 6 




♦individual & Group Support 
♦Community Grief Support 
*Grief Education 

(Churches, Schools & Civic Groups) 

♦Support for Families & Friends 



HOSPICE ALLIANCE 

Hospice Care Far The 

Terminally III Quality Of 

Life - A Hospice Goal, 

. *Palliative Care 
♦Pain cV Symptom Management 
♦Hands On Care 
♦24 Hour Medical Service for 
Hospice Patients 



4601 Washington 

Avenue 

Racine, WI 53405 

414-637-8344 



1015 65th Street 
Kenosha, WI 

53143 
414-658-8344 



141 South Pine St. 
Burlington, WI 

53105 
414-767-0490 



NEW LOCATION 



3747 

Grand Avenue 

Gurnee, IL 

708-263-1180 



j 



^ c (Exmtttry J&qmrje 

Restaurant 8c J3ani)uet ^facilities 
Gracious dining in the Wesley Sears Country Estate 



BUS TOURS LUNCH/DINNER WELCOME 



Lunch 

Served" Tuadifthtwj&h Saturday from 1 1:00 to300. Choose something simple 
as soup ft sandwich (14 50); I lot and cold sand»icha (H.50): Our "lilt" lunch 

nienuorourcmplrteIi)rdwn.Oufjpn^h(rf^<iiytoclucWi^^>^ 
entree, potato Of wgelahle, beverage AND dessert. 



Early Evening 



SerralTuesday ihmijh Saturday from }00 to &tt> p.m. Our 7 course dinner 
includes appetite r or soup or fresh hull cup, spinach salad with wim bacon 
dressing or tossed ubd, choice of sewral enlnw, choice of folalorWtwptible 
ASD dascrl AND beverage, Priced from JA95. Seafood, poultry, mi, salads -25 
llems. Specialty sannVkhrs. 



Banquet facilities from 

lO to 400. 

Card parties, meeting*, 

eipo'i wedding*, etc. 




"\ 



Dinners 

Served Tuesday through Saturday from &00 to 900. Irdudes our famous Lary 
SuimrJIiwpilr!, dm*: spread, spied appta and 2 syrprue salads. Choose from 
22 mints d seafood, poultry, Wal and barf, tossed or spinach salad, die « of pou ■ 
to or ^Tgetafclc. PLUSowr special of the day. • 



Champagne 

Sunday 

Brunch 

Brunch as you'w never had II before! 
Served from 10 00 am. to 1 00 p.m. 
Eggs, omrlelta, errpes, ml, seafood, 
duckm and meal items. PLUS spe- 
cials d lit f day includes our fruit com- 
pole wheel. Your older latai and 
served at your table. 



Mened/on Routes 120 & 45 Crayslakv, IL 

-Closed Mondays- 
All major credit caw honored. 

Lea tian 35 minutes from Touby & Edens - 




Your hosts, Bill & Kris Govas 



(708) 2230121 



r 



CUT IT OUT. 



;cial L 



5i) Ok Ov 



CASH BONUSES ON TRAVEL! 



Maintain a $100 minimum balance 
ana eliminate the monthly service fc 

Our checking account entitles you to 
cash bonuses when you make your travel 
arrangements through our special travel 
center. Just look at the other benefits you 
can receive: 

•Free Personalized Checks 

•No Per Check Fees 

•Interest With Qualifying Balances 

•$100,000 Common Carrier 
Accidental Death Insurance 

•24-Hour Credit Card Protection 

•24-Hour Emergency Cash Advance 

•Lifestyle Newsletter 

•Cash Bonuses on Travel 

•Key Ring Protection 

•And much more! 

You'll appreciate the honest value of 
these benefits. And, when you maintain 
a $100 minimum balance, we'll elimi- 
nate the ''$7 monthly fee. Stop by today 
to find out more! 





First State Sank 
of Round Lake 



MAIN OFFICE 

1777 N. Cedar Lake Rd. 
Round Lake [teach 
.{708)546-2111 



BRANCH OFFICII 



Aviiori & Coodnow nlvtls. I 



Round Lake 
(708) 5468144 



Nil l:x'|iir.iliiiii D.iii- 



N«» iMtiipttit i* ni.vili.-i! In o|H'it yuuraccuuni, 



' Ma 1 1 In 



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^^S^ ^S lM ^ ^^ffT^^M 



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ANTIOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT 

SiprmbiM 10, ^994 :Uk\ANJ^t^^f^\^^ Q $Hl i9 S ^ ^^ ESTATE 



Busjness BmEfs 



Antioch, IL 60002 . :• > 




Mitchell serves record numbers 

MILWAUKEE — More passengers used Milwaukee . 
County's General Mitchell International Airport in July 
1994 than in any other month in the history of the air- 
port. A total of 479,572 passengers used Mitchell in 
July, a 19.16 percent increase over July of 1993. To date 
this year, 3,032,573 passengers have used Mitchell/up 
15.41 percent over the first seven months of 1993. Each 
month since November 1993 Mitchell's passenger 
count has set a record for that month. 

Kemper joins European group 

LONG GROVE— The international arm of Kemper 
National Insurance Companies is moving toward full 
membership in PanEuroRisk, the associated European 
Economic Interest Group of UAP of France'. 
Membership is targeted for Jan. 1, 1995. Kemper 



International Corporation, UAP and PanEuroRisk 
signed a memorandum of cooperation that launches 
Kemper International into the formal application 
process for PanEuroRisk membership. The memoran- 
dum and PanEuroRisk membership commit the part- 
ners to a long-term agreement of mutual service and 
support for their respective global insurance programs. 
Kemper will be the only PanEuroRisk member that is 
not a UAP subsidiary or otherwise tied to UAP through 
equity. 

Toastmasters elect governor 

LAKE COUNTY— Ross Alexander of Villa Park was 
elected NW Division Governor for Dist. 30 Toastmas- 
ters and received one of the highest awards, 1994 Area 
Governor of the Year. He will serve 18 clubs in the 
northwest suburbs, including Toastmaster clubs in 
Lake Zurich, Libertyville, Long Grove and Lincolnshire. 
Toastmasters is the world's largest organization dedi- 
cated to Improving its members' communication and 



leadership skills. Toastmasters Is open to the public. At 
a Toastmaster meeting, members learn the following 
business skills: Job interviewing; meeting the public; 
thinking on their feet; organization of ideas; conduct- 
ing business meetings; listening skills; and speech writ- 
ing and delivery. For information on Toastmasters, call 
1-000-427-0627. 

Organization class to be held 

LAKE FOREST— A class titled "Too Much To Do 
and Too Little Time" will be held at Gorton Community 
Center, 400 E. Illinois Rd., Lake Forest, beginning 
Monday, Oct 3 from 7 to 9 p.m. The fee is $40 for two 
weeks. Eileen Parclman, owner of "Every-thing In Its 
Place," who has appeared on the "Today" and "Oprah" 
shows, will instruct the class. She will help students 
learn how to manage their time with goals, planning, 
and prioritizing. Participants should register by Friday, 
September 30. For more information, call 234-6060 
between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays. 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE ^^ d 






THIS WEEK 



<i 



w 



••>• 



New director 
atTMA 

Rus joins with extensive W 

experience 

PAGEC2 

At the movies 

Marcus Theatres in agpes- 
swe expanson jhode 

PAGEC2 



NewManpower 



♦ ■•1»! 




Thompson joins office 
automation staff 

ST0GKWATCH 



Change ;Dlv. 
+11/4 $0,76 



Company Price 
Abbott 31 1/B 

:; ! : AU^te^ : '^'^ ;H \;';:-l^^i;\>0 ; 72;^ 
Ameritech403/4 +3/8 $1.92 • 
AT&T 54 5/8 -1/2 ' $L32 

-Baxter 273/8 +3/8 $1;05 
Brunswick 197/B -1 5/B $0.44 

-Unicorn h 2H/8rf+l/8 $i.6u 
D. Witter 38 1/4 *3 3/8 $0,50 
Kemper 601/2 -13/8 $0.92 
McDonalds^ 26 7/8 +5/8 $0.24 
Motorola 52 3/8 -1 1/8 $0.28 

Peoples Etl26 $180 '„ 

Qkr.bafck 77 1/4 +7/8; ^$2.28 

;^SaraLee 221/B +1/8 v $0.64 
Sears 48 l/2 ji -3/8 $1.60 \ 
UAL 893/4 i3 3/8X$0.00 < 

Walpeens377/8 -1/2 $0.68y 
WMXTeck 26 7/8 +1/8 " $0.60 

JiienyElea 16 +1 ■■ $0.00 

W&wwf Wilier lott nearly 10 per- ; 

^fent on Wall Street Journal 
reports of drug money laddering 
by some of the firm's broken. 

fj\ Stock Watch provided by 



^*%v'-:' y iH 



... ■')■< 

„>■■'■'■'■- 



■ '■ •■•■•' ' ■ 

Service protects homeowners from scams 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 
Staff Reporter 

Need work done on the 
house — roofing, plumbing, 
remodeling or concrete work — 
but arc afraid of scam contractors 
not finishing the job or disap- 
pearing after the down payment 
is made? 

Negligence and deception ' 
have become widespread within 
the construction industry over 
the years, and reports of elderly 
victims are especially becoming 
more frequent. 

That's where the Vernon 
Hills-based Homeowner's Refer- 
ral Service steps in. 

"I am working on a case as we 
speak of a concrete contractor 
that ripped this poor lady off," 
said Kimberly Sieler, who heads 
Homeowner's Referral Serviced 

Generally, here's the scenario: 
A homeowner wants a job done 
on the house but has neither the 
time nor the money to seek out a 
reliable contractor. Instead, the 
homeowner finds a cheap con- 
tractor who later skips out on the 
work or does a shabby job. 

"A homeowners figures he 
will spend $2,000 less to go with 
these companies that they know 
nothing about," said Sieler. "We 
get honest, competent, reliable 
companies instead of people 
working out of their truck, 
demanding a down payment and 
later running off." 

Her business serves as a liai- 
son between construction con- 



tractors and homeowners, refer- 
ring homeowners to reputable 
contractors, she said. Not only do 
they refer contractors but they 
also send out inspectors to a site 
to guarantee a quality job is being 
done. 



If the job is not completed to 
the homeowner's satisfaction, 
Sieler said she will take the neces- 
sary steps to make sure the job is 
completed satisfactorily. 

Depending upon the season, 
Sieler said she makes approxi- 



mately 80 to 100 referrals a week. 
As an incentive to insure quality 
work, contractors pay a percent- 
age to Homeowners Referral 
Service. Sieler also has all the 
insurance and licensing back- 
1 See PROTECTION page C2 







Quickprint 

Mary McCarthy can create a personalized children's book In less than 10 minutes with her 
equipment and software program, choosing from over a dozen titles. McCarthy Is available at 
the Undenhurst McDonalds on Grand Ave each Thursday, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. with a portion of 
those sates going to the Ronald McDonald Children's Charity. McCarthy's charity program Is 
also available to any Interested Lake County retailer.— Photo by Neal Tucker 



Grand Hunt Center in Gurnee fully leased 



Opus North Corp. has 
announced the signing of four 
leases totalling more than 52,000 
square feet of retail space at Grand 
Hunt Center in north suburban 
Gurnee, bringing the shopping 
center to 100 percent occupancy. 

OfficeMax, Fashion Bug and 
FuncoLand have signed leases in 
Grand Hunt Center, a 60-acre 
retail development on the south- 
west corner of Grand Ave. and 
Hunt Club Rd. that includes a 
Target, Circuit City and Jewel 
Foods. Opus is building a 
133,000-square-foot portion of 
the center on 12.5 acres between 
Target and Jewel. 

Gary Pachucki, director of real 

:kvy£-l.l'v^- :■■■'■■ ■ 



estate for Opus, said the strength 
of the Gurnee area retail market 
and diversity of stores located 
within Grand Hunt Center con- 
tributed to Opus' reaching 100 
percent occupancy so quickly. 

Opus purchased the land ear- 
lier this year and immediately 
announced a lease to Kohl's for 
80,684 square feet of space. With 
these new leases, the center has 
reached 100 percent occupancy. 

"Gurnee continues to be one 
of the fastest growing retail mar- 
kets in the Chicago metropolitan 
area With Grand Hunt Center, 
we have attracted an excellent 
combination of soft goods and 
specialty retailers that are neces- 



sary for long-term success in 
such a competitive marketplace," 
Pachucki said. - 

OfficeMax, a subsidiary of It- 
Mart based out of Shaker 
Heights, Ohio, will open a 23,500- 
square-foot store featuring a vari- 
ety of office products, including 
furniture, computer accessories 
and office supplies. 

Fashion Bug, which is based 
iuX or Bensalem, Pa., and carries 
moderate-priced casual wear 
clothing for women, has leased 
12,500 square feet of retail space. 

FuncoLand, which leased a 
1,650-square-foot store, is owned 
by Funco, Inc. based in Minneapo- 
lis and specializes in buying and 



selling new and used video games. 

Also Raskin and Peggy 
McNamara, of Mid-America Real 
Estate Corp. in Oakbrook, repre- 
sented Opus, OfficeMax and 
Fashion Bug as leasing agents. 
James Paul & Associates, Inc., In 
North Riverside, represented 
FuncoLand, as the leasing agent 

Kohl's opened Aug. 5. 
OfficeMax, Fashion Bug and 
FuncoLand are scheduled to 
open in the late fall. 

Opus North is a design/build 
construction and real estate 
development firm with extensive 
experience in retail centers, busi- 
ness parks, office buildings, com- 
mercial and industrial facilities. 




BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UvIceIH Newspapers' ScpTEMbtn 70, 1994 



Marcus plans expansion 



The Marcus Corporation 
- announced plans for its theater 
division, Marcus Theaters 
Corporation, to double the size of 
its Milwaukee-based motion pic- 
ture theater circuit within five or 
six years. 

; "Our goal Is to have at least 
400 screens by the year 2000 
while maintaining our historic 
margins," stated Bruce J. Olson, 
president of Marcus Theaters. 
"We will accomplish this goal 
through a combination of at least 
10 to 12 new projects, screen 
expansion at existing locations 
and -pursuing some key acquisi- 
tions," Olson added. 

The company currently oper- 
ates 189 screens in Wisconsin 
and Illinois.' It is the largest 
exhibitor in Wisconsin and is 
ranked 18th nationally. 

The company's planning is 
already underway to add 48 screens 
during the current and next fiscal 
years. An eight-screen complex is 
under construction in Dclafield, 
Wisconsin. The company previ- 
ously announced plans for a new 
theater in New Berlin, Wisconsin. 
Twelve additional new screens will 
be added at existing locations is 
Racine, Wisconsin (2), Mcquon, 
Wisconsin (3), Oak Creek, 
Wisconsin (3), and Gurnec, Illinois 
(4). Also, 54 screens (six new com- 
plexes and one addition) arc 
presently in various stages of ncgo- 

Protection 

From page CI 

grounds on each contractor she 

recommends as a well. 

She also works with home- 
owners who have experienced 
j scam jobs by hunting down the 
contractor and threatening legal 
action. In the meantime, she 
finds another contractor to com- 
plete the job. 

"We can lead you in the right 
direction and give you the neces- 
sary steps to get your problem 



tlations or planning In the Midwest 
"Contrary to some doomsay- 
crs in the 19Q0's who predicted 
the demise of the movie theater, 
we're here to say that we're not 
only alive, but very healthy — hav- 
ing achieved record results for 
fiscal 1994, which ended in May. 
In fact, the entire industry is 
heal tiller today than it was five or 
six years ago. Attendance is up, 
quality film production is 
increasing and new production 
companies arc being formed," 
Olson noted. 

"Two significant technological 
achievements have quietly gone 
unheralded over the past year 
which we believe arc greatly 
responsible for the resurgence of 
movie going. These arc comput- 
erized special effects and digital 
sound. The special effects that 
people arc seeing in Jurassic Park, 
Forrest Gump, Mask, and other 
movies are computer-generated. 
Producers can now bring effects 
to the screen that previously they 
only dreamt about. Just as 
important as dazzling the audi- 
ences is the lower cost of produc- 
tion using computers. Lower film 
costs will translate into more pro- 
duction and higher profits," 
Olson said. "Digital sound is so 
dramatic in our theaters that peo- 
ple walking out arc talking as 
much about the sound as the 
movie itself," Olson added. 



resolved," said Siclcr. 

She said anytime homeown- 
ers hire a contractor they should 
check out the contractor's cre- 
dentials and call the references. 
"Don't take their word," she said. 

The Vernon Hills company 
serves all of Lake County, parts of 
DuPage, McHenry and Cook 
counties, and southern Wisconsin. 

"There was a great need for 
personal .protection," Siclcr said. 
"We're here to help." 



ATTENTION 
REAL ESTATE AGENTS 

•Are you allowing money lo slip 

through your fingers? 

• Would you like lo sell properties with 

NO financing hassles? 

•Offer fantastic terms, when others can't? 

•Would you like buyers knocking at YOUR door? 

• Earn quicker COMMISSIONS!!! 

We can show you how 
with our Proven programs!!! 

SECURE FUNDING 548-1390 

Member National Real Estate Mortgage Investors Assoc. 



MarcfUcirdt 

Oldsmabile 

Huge Inventory dj 'Automobiles 





HAVE IT YOUR WAY 

Whatever It Takes f 

HUGE SAVINGS 



'95 

V-8, 
Auroras 
in Stock %.i<.«K_#;m # 'i6 1 995, 

On Rt», 41 at Washington * Gurn— , (L « 249-1 300 





VI Ps attend grand opening 

Several dignitaries were on hand to help the First State Bank of Gurnee celebrate Its September 
grand opening. Attending the VIP reception were (from left) Jules Laser, bank chairman; Illinois 
Lieutenant Governor Bob Kustra; Illinois State Senator Adeline Gep-Karis;'John Steele, bank vice 
president and cashier; and David Schroeder, bank president and CEO. 



TMA of Lake County selects new director 



The Board of Directors of the 
TMA of Lake County announced 
the appointment of its new 
Executive Director, Joel Rus of 
Arlington Heights. Rus joins the 
TMA with extensive experience in 
non-profit association manage- 
ment and impressive credentials. 
Rus was selected from a field of 
seven candidates who were 
screened and interviewed by the 
Executive Committee of the TMA 
Board of Directors. He will take 
over his duties at the TMA on Oct. 
. 1. For the past 12 years, Rus has 
been the chief executive officer at 



the Travelers Aid Assn., a nation- 
al trade group currently head- 
quartered in Schaumburg. As the 
CEO, Rus has overseen the man- 
agement of a budget of over $1 
million, a staff of 20 and 75 chap- 
ters nationwide. 

Rus graduated from 
Michigan State Univ. in 1964 with 
bachelor's degrees in both busi- 
ness and political science. He. 
also holds master's. degrees in 
public administration from Ball 
State Univ. in Indiana and 
Business Administration from 
Pcppcrdinc UniV. in California. 



The* TMA of Lake County is 
beginning its third full year of 
operation with 59 member organi- 
zations including private corpora- 
tions, property owners and devel- 
opers, transportation consultants, 
municipal and township govern- 
ments and local, and regional 
transportation agencies. This pri- 
vate/public partnership strives to 
employ proven transportation 
demand management strategics 
and enhance channels of commu- 
nication between the private and 
public sectors for the benefit of the 
constituency served by the TMA. 




- ■ • • j 



American 

SECURITY ^= 

Mortgage 

Illinois Residential 
Mortgage Licensee 

How Can American Security Mortgage Help Me? 

Example: If you have s 10,000 in debt at 18% interest this could cost you approximately 
*500 per month and at the end of 10 years you will still owe s 10,000!!! 

What Could American Security Mortgage Do For Me? 

If you obtain a Home Equity Loan with American Security Mortgage your payment may 
drop over s 300 per month and your principle will also decrease. 

Plus American Security Mortgage has MORE. 



■ 100% Home Equity Loan "Debt Consolidation Loans 

• Self-Employed/No income Verification 

$ m: iM *FHA/VA Loans . . 
life 



MM) 



Why Go Anywhere Else? 

At American Security Mortgage 

'Tour Best Interest Is Our Main Concern." 

Call 1-800-798-7628 



Corporate Office : 
• One Tiffany Pointe 

Suite 210 

Bloomingdale, IL 60108-2819 

(708)351-2877 
fs> Toll Free 1-800-729-7628 
mm Fax (708) 351-9938 



Branch Office 
One NBD Plaza 

Suite 205 

Corner, Rt. 22 & Rand Rd. 

Lake Zurich, IL 60047 

(708)540-6122 

Fax (708) 540-6154 



Branch Office 

10735 S. Cicero Ave. 

Suite 105 

Oak Lawn, IL 60453 



ni'»i 



(708)499-4424 i • 
Fax (708) 499-6780 



LeAl 



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StptcMbtR 10, 1994 UkElANd Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



■ 



■ 



] 






: 



' 



I 



■> 



i 

s 






> 



' 







Terrl Murphy 

irig 





on ReaI Estate 



, selling high, and holding out 




The 
real estate 
market and 
the stock 
market run 
a number 
of parallels. 
Shrewd 
investors 
pluck the 
low stocks" 
and know the perfect time to sell 
for a profit. Although the stock 
market is more quickly volatile 
than the real estate market, there 
is one universal similarity that 
endures. 

In most cases the seller must 
sell and close the home before 
purchasing another. In this situa- 
tion, the seller, as would anyone, 
wants to get the highest and best 
price for the property. 

The buyer, of course, is look- 
ing to get a property at the lowest 
price possible to effect a "good 
deal." The seller will also be wear- 
ing a buyer's hat simultaneously 
when looking for a new or differ- 
ent home, and will also expect to 
purchase at the lowest, best price 
possible. 

If the purchasers arc limited to 
the same areas, and the econom- 
ic factors run fairly equal, and it is 
unlikely that the seller will obtain 
the top range and still expect to 
buy at below fair market value. 



It is necessary to understand 
that it is not often that one can 
have both ends of the investment 
spectrum working for you at the 
same time. There are other key 
factors that can influence the sit- 
uation in other ways. If the prop- 
city that the seller has an interest 
in is a foreclosure, the normal 
rules of supply and demand arc 
different, and do not often apply. 
Additional points that affect the 
normal pricing can be due to the 
financial situation of the selling 
parties. Those individuals carry- 
ing two mortgages or heavy per- 
sonal burdens arc more likely to 
sell at slightly below fair market 
value to effect a quick sale. 

If the property is owned by a 
third party holding company, 
they will need to consider future 
and present carrying costs before 
making a "deal" if any deals are to 
be made. Other considerations to 
figure bottom line is what the 



these homes may require more 
time and less pricing flexibility, 
depending on the individual 
case. 

Other areas of the country 
may offer different investment 
potential than your present area. 
Areas that have suffered econom- 
ic impacts like the southwest may 
have more supply and less 
demand, making the investment 
on the other end richly reward- 
ing. 

The bottom line — when mov- 
ing within the same area, selling 
high and buying low is certainly 
everybody's dream. Remember 
that fact when you are the seller 
on your end, and buying later. Do 
not be Insulted with offers lower 
than fair market value for your 
home. You may not know where 
the buyer is coming from geo- 
graphically or otherwise, or the 
"coaching" they may be getting. 

Working with a good appraiser 



company's investment is to the and a good agent can keep you 



employee. In some cases the 
company may have offered a 
bonus to the employee to induce 
a quicker sale arid reduced man- 
agement costs. Third party 
appraisals can run more conserv- 
atively due to customized deco- 
rating, competitive housing and 
bonus plans the employer may 
consider when transferring an 
employee. Purchasing one of 



t 

Thompson new computer 
specialist at Manpower 



Corinnc Thompson has joined 
Manpower's office automation 
service staff. An Office 

Automation Specialist, her work 
supports customers' computer 
training needs as well as 
Manpower's internal computer 
operations and training. She has 
a background in systems analysis 
and a bachelor of science degree 
in management from Northeast- 
em Illinois University. 

As the industry leader in plac- 
ing temporary employees in the 
workforce, Manpower developed 
Skillwarc® — a system to quickly 
and efficiently train employees to 
use various software programs. 
Manpower's Sklllware, a proven 
training tool, has trained 89 per- 
cent of Fortune 100 companies 
nationwide. Skillwarc is a hands- 
on, self- paced, PC-delivered 
training method. It is available at 
all of Manpower's offices and can 
also be transported to customers' 
sites. 

Thompson sees her new posi- 
tion as multi-faceted. She knows 
that she will be training cus- 
tomers' employees with 
Skillwarc, training Manpower's 
employees with Skillwarc and 
providing technical support to all 
of Manpower's offices and cus- 
tomers in Lake and McHcnry 
counties. This will include mak- 
ing recommendations on the sys- 
tems and software that will most 
effectively enhance business 
operations. 

"It's not just one job," 
Thompson remarked. "My back- 
ground in training and automat- 
ed systems as well as my enthusi- 
asm about Skillwarc will be key in 
this new challenging position." 

Manpower employs word 
processors, secretaries, data 



entry operators, receptionists, 
customer service representatives, 
shipping and receiving clerks, 
assemblers, machine operators, 
lab technicians, engineers, nurs 
es, medical assistants, and more. 
Manpower Inc. is the world's 
largest staffing services firm. 



focused on the constant changes 
in your market place. 

Winning the war, not the bat- 
tle, is what makes negotiations 
successful. Keep a clear focus, 
understand the reasons for 
counter offers, and make the 
decisions that arc 

Questions or comments may be 
directed to Terri Murphy, Box 
6234, Ubertyuille, IL 60048. 

Abbott employees 
support WTTW 

More than 60 Abbott Labora- 
tories employees served as tele- 
phone pledge operators during a 
recent WTTW-TV Channel 11 
fundraiser. The Abbott volunteers 
recorded approximately 225 pledges 
totaling $12,550. Abbott employees 
have contributed thousands of 
hours of their personal time to sup- 
port civic enhancement projects. 




Innovative seller 

The sales center at Country Lane at Wadsworth Lake won 
the 'Sammy' award for Innovative sales center design. The 
center sits at the entrance of the Baxter Homes' community 
of 126 Vlctorlan-style luxury single-family homes near 
Wadsworth. The award was given by the Sales and 
Marketing Council of the Homes Builders Association of 
Greater Chicago. 



ReaI Estate BiuEf 



golf course villas 

WADSWORTH— The Villas at Midlanc are part of a 182- 
acre golf course community centering on Midlane Country 
Club, and will include '47 homes with designs specially created 
to blend with the natural environment. Abundant windows 
offering views of the golf course and numerous other deluxe 
features are offered in the homes, priced from $227,900 to 
$247,900. 

Empty- ncstcrs from Wadsworth and Waukcgan are among the 
first buyers in the community which has been open for just five 
weeks, according to Larry Grossman, president of AMRiC Midlane 
Corporation, the developer of the golf course community. 




^irst StateQank oiQumcc 

Your Community Bank 



4.06 



APY 



A 4% interest rate on savings is as hard to find as a 
bank that gives Free Samples. But at First Slate Bank 
of Gurnee, we have both. 

We're offering a special rate of 4% on our First Rate 
Savings Account, with an annual percentage yield of 
4.06%, guaranteed through 1994. And we're giving 
away free samples, just for stopping by. Plus, we're 



doing something else that's rare. When you open an 
account with $1,000, we'll enter your name in a 
drawing for a trip for two to Cancun, Mexico. 

So stop by our office at Hunt Club Road and 
Washington Street in Gurnee. We're the easy to find 
bank with hard to find service. 






•The annual pontage yield (APY) on the First Rate Savings Account is 4.06%. guaranteed through December M, 1994. After December 31, the rate may change without notice. 
The minSml"SSl re i to open the account is $50,00. The minimum deposit required to a«Hd service fee is $300.00. Fee* may reduce earnings on the account. 



* 




CtNDIR 



{Jirst Statefyankoi gurnee 

6495 'Washington Strut gurnee, KCtneis 60031 
(708)855-2400 'fax (708) 855-8009 



EL 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UkcM Newspapers SipTCMbcii 70, 1994 



First Midwest employee celebrates 65 years 




NEAL TUCKER 

Staff Reporter 

First Midwest Dank will be a 
different place someday without 
Mary Eiffler. That is because the 
03-year-old Eifflcr, who just cele- 
brated her 65th anniversary in 
banking, has been a Fixture with 
the bank for over 20 years. 

* Eifflcr began in banking at the 
Illinois National Bank, Oct. 1 1929. 
That building is across the street 
from her present employer, just 
off of Sheridan Rd on Washington 
St in Waukcgan. 

"Her duties at that first bank job 
were to prepare statements and 
file checks, which involved much 
more paperwork than today. 
Instead of receiving their monthly 
statements by mail, customers 
would come to the bank in per- 
son. This gave Eifflcr the opportu- 
nity to know each customer by 
face and name. After the Great 



Depression took hold of the econ- 
omy, the bank eventually failed. 

She was unemployed for only 
a short time, taking a job at 
Citizens National Dank across the 
street in building that now house 
her present employer. Years earli- 
er, she had attended Waukcgan 
Business School on the fourth 
floor of that building, taking 
accounting and other business 
courses. 

Eifflcr started in banking 
earning $60 a month and thought 
she 'had the world by the tail.' 
Her husband worked as a print- 
ing pressman, so her Income was 
supplemented by his salary of $25 
per week, 

"We lived like rich people in a 
three-room apartment for $9 a 
week, including utilities and furni- 
ture." she said. 

Many things have changed in 
her industry after more than six 



Volunteerism creates good feeling 



"I have the opportunity to 
work with over 4,000 volunteers 
in order to keep the United Way 
operational," said Jan Edgar, 
president of the United Way of 
Lake County. "And even more arc 
referred by our Lake County 
Volunteer Center to other agen- 
cies," Edgar continued. The 
Volunteer Center for Lake County 
provides a clearinghouse on vol- 
unteer opportunities in Lake. 
County. Prospective volunteers 
can select from over 300 different 
opportunities based on their 
interests and time availability. 

At a meeting of the Lake 
Suburban Chapter of Women in 
Management, Edgar gave an 
overview of the trends in volun- 
teerism. According to a 1991 
Gallup Organizational National 
Survey on Giving and 
Volunteering in the U.S., about 51 
percent of Americans volun- 
teer—even though they have 
experienced a decline in their 
household income. 

Edgar went on to report the 
total number of volunteer hours 
in 1992 amounted to 20.5 billion. 



When placed with a monetary 
value of $11.58 per hour (as 
reported in the Gallup survey), 
the value of the volunteer hours 
came to $176.4 billion, or 5 per- 
cent of the Gross National 
Product. 

"There arc many reasons why 
people volunteer," cited Edgar, 
"including the sharing of experi- 
ence or expertise in helping oth- 
ers and solving or impacting on a 
community problem. Others vol- 
unteer for the opportunity to 
develop new skills, gain insight 
and personal growth and devel- 
opment. 

While a number of national 
surveys have found that volun- 
teers tend to be healthier and 
happier than others their own 
age, one study suggests that vol- 
unteerism contributes to a longer, 
life. 

In closing Jan Edgar reported 
there arc unlimited opportunities 
to volunteer in Lake County. 
Volunteering can be an activity 
where a little goes a long way. 
"Don't give till it hurts — give till it 
feels good," Edgar concluded. 



? 



STEDMAN'S 



Real Estate Market Place 

2404 W. Johnjburti Rd. • Mel lenry. IL (10050 



gj" (815)385-0611 j 





NEW CONSTURCTiON 

Youi new horn* 1* uider raottrucaon In Johneburg. Tbie 
home It no "L* thtped ran* will • 2 cat garage and > wry - 
large lot You *tl tin have Ime to customize many i 



of siit horn* to your taslti. Rd batem ant, irepleoe and a 
matter bedroom bih. 1300 tq. (L Call today. MHJSOO. 



TOO NEW FOR 
PICTURE 

A idd home *rl»i a good roof, fenced yard, and a beeemenL 
Locatad acroea fie tbeet Irom a channel lo ihe Chain 
OX«k m an a wooded tol Mh oak treat Needa torn* carpal 
and petit That* ahoukt be enough room lo add a gang*. 
THihomaliprto«itoaal<uleW¥at»><,tOO. 



TOO NEW FOR 
PICTURE 

BIG FOR THE S$$ 

10 room*, 4 bedroom e, 2 beftroome, betemanl, 2 car 
garaga, and a good alrad yard. THt homo olrar* an Ideal 
IrHew arrangement or could ba a g reel twetfcnenl Moi« of 
t» flooring k\ he horn* It hardwood. There b a raw tump 
pump and new lurnece. There la a 2 ear haatad Baraga, 
[ocaltd near achool, Me and a park. MM.WO. 




TN« home haa everyHng. nauttal ca/peeng titoughoul 
horn a. larga roomt. cuatom canoe, hil parwly Aniened 
baaemanC ecreened pouch and eun roam, abova ground 
pool, 2 1 12 car garaga and • lancad yard. Gcrnpftla In-law 
arrangement afti aapartte entrance, Mohan, dining room, 
uVtag room and mora only. •III.SOO. 




PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION 



A aupartj ralaad ranch tut can ba all hat you wan I wtl begki 
contraction eoonl In en alee en new hornet. Ihltl 1/2yaar 

nixjrvlajoniijiatrntiulealrom Ihe train tUrJcn and a couple 
ol Uocka Irom Rte. 12. Lower (aval ha* IW ahed laundry 
room. Sblamalo pick colon and upgradaa. •134.004. 




BUY TODAY! 



Owner eey t tefll I Dim t noma wrui ail lour badroomi on he 
upper lava). Kama atti on a Urge lolvrih a lanced beck 
yard. Bar ki family room, and luring room I* at I up lot a Kra 
place or wood burner. Larga deck oil rear ol home. Potable 
burineta foealon. '114,000. 




GLOWS WITH OWNER PRIDE 



Extremely wel maintained home Kittmlnukra from Route 
12. Home boaata • buUt In hutch In the Snaig room and 
ahelvetln tiehkig room, double deep garage, tuperiool 
deck witi t trlew oILake Jeriryn, and all taitnem. Too 
much lo I at -you mutt tee tilt one, C«J today. Mia, BOO. 




COMPLETELY REDONE 

Hawar carpeting , timeoe. and hoi wt»i heater. Matter euitt 

boat It a private bath end a walk In dotal Alappfaneea 
ttay and ttete It t*l Km* to pick out your own colon for tie 
tecand baft. Perfect home only a coupte" ol blocka from tie 
Chen CUket lor boating run. ■N.tOO. 



decades. Technology has been 
responsible for most of those 
changes. Everything used to be 
done by pen and ink. An adding 
machine was even a luxury. 

Even the physical size of paper 
currency changed. President 
Franklin Delano Roosevelt made 
the order. This was expensive for 
already financially troubled banks, 
because they had to buy new cash 
drawers to handle the money. The 
change did cause extra work, 
though, which was something 
most people were looking for. 

Today, most banking transac- 
tions arc done on computers. 
Eifflcr also says the customer has 
changed significantly. They arc 
more educated about investing 



money and making it work for 
them. 

"In the old days, a lot of people 
put their money under the mat- 
tress or in a sugar bowl." she said. 

Eifflcr now works In the audit- 
ing department at First Midwest 
Many people would probably like 
to invite her over to the house 
because she primarily handles the 
confounding job of solving state- 
ments that do not balance. 

She still has time on the side 
to participate in charities and has 
three times acted as president of 
the Zonta Club, an international.* 
women's charity fund-raising 
organization. She drives. women 
to the grocery store, as well as 
others to events held by the 



■■■'j 

Waukcgan Community 'players 
and to Waukegan Community 
Concerts. Her other volunteer 
interests are the Waukegan 
Historical Society, the St. Thcrcsc 
Medical Center Auxiliary and the 
Utdc Fort Lioness Club. . 

Family is also. very important 
to the mother of one and grandr 
mother of two. Daughter Sue 
Brandt lives in Lake Villa while 
granddaughter Karen Fundcrbunk 
lives in Fox Lake and grandson 
Mark Brandt resides in Grayslakc. 

Eifflcr feels privileged that she 
has been able Jo succeed in a 
banking career for so many years. 

"I can't believe I have'spent my 
entire life doing exactly what I 
want to do. It's perfect" she said. 




Mary Elffler poses near a safe place In the First Midwest Bank building In downtown Waukegan. The 
83-year-old Elffler, who has been with First Midwest for 20 years, celebrated her 65th anniversary In 
banking this year.— Photo by Todd F, Helsler 




SPECIAL SfiLE 

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Storm Doors 

Take 10% Off 

Our Already Low* 
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NEED 
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Mon.-Thurs. 1Q.7; Fri. 10-6; Sat. 10-4; Sun. 11-2 






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"L*'U! 



ScpTtwbc* 30, 1994 UIceIancI Newspapers UPSERVICE M| 



I 

f 

i 



? 



f 









' 



I 



i 



; 




It's tIhe taIIc of tUe town 

Get it off youR chesi (708)225-8075 



Upservlce Is a phone-In column presented as a feature of 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no claim to 
the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland Newspapers does 
not claim the content or the subject matter as fact but as the per- 
sonal opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the 
right to edit copy or to refrain from printing a message. Call In at 
223-8073 and leave your message 24-hours.a day. Although the 
call is anonymous, please leave your village name. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Methuselah's mail 

With all duo respect to the lovely 
Wauconda lady who 1 04 years old, 
I want to advise you that I am a 
936-year-old resident of 
Wauconda; I got this old by stand- 
ing In line at the Wauconda post 
office. 

Trains and planes 

This Is in response to "Stop horns.' If 
you move near a train tracks, you 
are going to have trains. If you 
move near an airport, you are 
going to have airplanes, 

Inspect your homes 

to alt you Sweetwater Mill residents 
who* constantly complain how 
shoddy your homes were built, why 
don't you get a life? The fact of the 
matter Is you shouldn't blame your 
builder, but your' former village 
Inspector.- Thankfully, my. home was 
built beforethls time. 

Speed kills 

This Is In response to the person talk- 
ing about the speed In Antloch. 
This Is not a question of them 
speeding through town", but In a 
subdivision from Lake Marie to Rte 
5& Jfhej&ad, Is surrounded by t rees 
so It Irn6t"a'bedutlficatl6h problem. 
It; Is the question of Idiots; zooming * 
out of there. 

No illegals 

This Is regarding the. Upservlce call 
'Boot them but.' That person was 
totally right about Illegal aliens 
coming to this country. People In 
this country who don't vote, and 
those who do vote should call the 
congressmen and get them to stop 
allowing Illegal aliens from coming 
into this country and taking full 
advantage of entitlements. Our 
system Is taxed enough paying for 
our own residents. To get benefits, 
you should be In this country at 
least five yeas and paying into the 
system. People need to start calling 
their congressman. Talk to people 
you know about It. - If congress 
doesn't act on It, we can vote 
them out. 



from Round Lake, Grayslake, Lake 
Villa and all the surrounding areas 
like Fox Lake are having as much 
trouble as we are having In 
Ingteslde with getting our malt ' 
delivered. I am constantly getting 
things delivered that do not belong 
to me. I also have people bring me 
my mall that they received. 
Yesterday a very Important letter of. 
mine was delivered to someone 
else. It really worries me. 

Same old tune 

This Is a complaint about the 
Grayslake marching band.. The 
football team finally won their first 
game after 22 losses and the band 
left the field before the end of the 
game. Couldn't they have stayed 
and cheered them on? 

Fence it 

This Is In regards to the two callers 
that talked about the children's 
plastic toys. First of all I cannot 
believe a person can criticize a 
child toy. They are brightly colored 
for the child's pleasure and they 
are plastic for safety. At what . 
these things cost, they will not end 
up In a landfill. They will be given 
away, sold recycled.- or donated, 
tf you don't care about the look of. 
toys In your neighbors yards, then 
put up a fence. 



f'^rjerv 



Rank has privileges 

To the taxpayers of Grayslake 
School District 46. . Is our money 
really going for better education? 
They have classes of over 30 Idds 
and growing. They have cut many 
courses from 1he Middle School 
and many children are now walk- 
ing to school because they have 
cut the bus routes. How many new 
computers and phone systems 
have been purchased? Have you 
seen the new look at the district 
offices? I think many of our chil- 
dren are being cheated at the 
expense of the District 46 adminis- 
tration. 

Clean up - 

I'm glad that someone else 
noticed the custodial problems In- 
. Grayslake School District 46. The 
busing Issue In the paper was right 
on. 



Multiplying trains °J efald me hero 



l : . agree with the caller 'Losing 
sleep,' We have a similar' problem 
In Grayslake; 1 Many trains come 
through this town .at nights. 
Sometimes they are five minutes 
apart- and have steadily worsened 
since we moved here five years 
ago. We understand the need for 
horns at crossings but why do they 
have to be so loud and sound so 
continuously? Does anybody know 
"what can be done with this? 

A country mile 

This Is for losing Steep.' You In Lake 
Villa are not the only ones losing 
sleep. We In Antloch as well as 
other towns along the Wisconsin 
^Central Une are losing sleep as well. 
Even two miles away we are seri- 
ously affected by the train. 

Keep the faith 

Tm calling regarding the Round 
Lake varsity football team? We are 
0-3 and afe'not doing too well, but 
I still have faith In them. Good luck. 

Wrong address 

I would like to find out If the people 



My gripe Is about the Lakeland 



Newspapers obituaries for Robert 
C. Chrlstensen from Round Lake 
Beach. I dm looking at a lot of the 
people who have passed away, 
and they do not get a write up If 
they don't have money or don't 
know, somebody. This gentleman 
was a serviceman for five years In 
Cuba and received a Silver Star 
and a CMH, which Is a 
Congressional Medal of Honor. It 
breaks my heart that there Is. not 
.write-up about the CMH. They Just 
don't give those things away. 
Something Is owed to this man and 
his family. This man was truly a hero 
and deserves a separate. column 
outside of the obits. 

Very gross lakes 

I'm catling to applaud the person 
who called In 'Gross Lake.' These 
lakes here are terrible. Last year In 
Round Lake I almost lost a toe by 
stepping on something sharp. 
These lakes need to be dredged 
and cleaned. They are not fit for 
fishing, swimming, or water skiing. 

MYOB 

This Is In response to 'Not toying 
around.' They are concerned 
about the young neighbors who 
have brightly colored toys In the 
yard making It look like a nursery 
school. I think they should mind 
their oWn business and not worry 
about It. Maybe they will donate 
them to other young families "or sell 
them , In a garage sale so they 
won't end up In the landfill. They 
should keep their noses In their own 
backyards. • 

Big Brother missing 

This Is In response to 'Not toying 
around.' I noticed the person has 
been observing all these toys In 
someone else's yard. The first 
thing: get a life. The second thing: 
when you put your garbage out by 
the road, where does It go? Dun . 
.. /. landfill. Leave everybody else 
alone and do what you have to do 
and let others do what they have 
to do. Your neighborhood can 
then be happy. Just remember. 
Big Brother isn't always watching. 



Handicapped help 

I am a handicapped person from 
Mundeleln. I went to the Vernon 
Hills Days and could not get out of 
my :car when! parked. * Please 
have parking facilities for the hand- 
icapped. Next year, could you get 
more parking spaces for people 
. who can't get out of their vehicles. 
I want to thank the Vemon Hills 
Police for giving me a parking 
space and the County Sheriff's 
Department for helping me. They 



were very kind. 



_SHBpGB^*£ tor. m 



• MARQUARDT HYUNDAI* 

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On Rt. 41 at Washington St. • East Exit • Gurnee 

• (708) 249-1300 • 




Bathroom reading 

I have a suggestion for the mother 
who Is trying to potty train her son. 
I used to sit In the bathroom on the 
edge of the tub and read to them. 
The time and patience really 
helped. It takes a couple of weeks, 
but It eventually works. 

Mow your own 

The toys' In the backyard keep the 
children occupied and keep 1hem 
In the safety of the yard. Since you 
are not the one who has to mow 
around them, I don't see much 
room for complaint. 



Stop light? 

We'd like to know If there will be a 
stoplight erected on Rollins Rd and 
Nicole. It Is very dangerous for. 
people trying to get out of the sub- 
division. There Is going to be one 
heck of an accident. The street 
that goes Into the Willow. Ridge 
subdivision has a bunch of speed- 
ers going Into the next subdivision. 
Country Walk. They do not care 
that children are playing there and 
may get hurt. 

Passed bus 

This afternoon, I was on my way 
home from work going east on Rte 
134. I was stopped by a school bus 
which was headed west. There 
was traffic backed up In both 
directions. The driver opened the 
door to let the student off when a 
little red , car came around the left 
hand side to pass the bus. The bus 
driver. saw. what was going on and 
stopped the child from (getting off 
until she saw lhat there was. no 
danger. This upset me a great 
deal. The car In question pulled 
Into the parking of the liquor store. 
I thought of going to the lot to get 
the license number but I did not 
know what to do with It. Would I 
need to give testimony? The was a 
lot of traffic, but now It Is starting to 



bother me. What should I have' 
done? Would I have been sorry If I 
had become Involved. Would the 
police believe my word If I reported 
It? I wonder what I should do If this, 
ever happens again. 

Always open 

A short while back In the orienta- 
tion lecture at Antloch High School, 
my daughter was advised that the 
high school has a 24-hour message 
service so parents can call In sick or 
tardy. We had one. occasion I 
called my daughter In and the 
machine malfunctioned. My 
daughter had unexcused 
absences until they could tqlk,tp 
me, It was fine until the assistant 
principal lectured the classes that' 
the service was available. When 
my daughter questioned It, she 
was asked If she reported the map 
function of the machine.. 

I don't believe that Is my daugh- 
ter's function. It Is now 1 a.m. and I 
am trying to report my daughter's 
absence. There Is no answer at this . 
24-hour number. Your system has 
failed. If my daughter has an unex- 
cused absence because we are 
not up at 7 a.m. In the morning to 
report It, I am sorry. If you want 
money for another referendum, 
you should start making things bet- 
ter with a new answering machine.* 
We have a private bus service and 
new security service. It took four of 
those uniformed people to Identify 
a car that peeled rubber at 1he 
entrance of the high school. I se'ri- 
, ously wonder about the appropria- 
tion of funds. I think they can be. 
better used than tor things like that . 
There. Is a problem at Antloch Hlgt> 
School... It has only been a couple, ■ 
of weeks for this new system and'l 
have had it already. 

Not important " 

Once again Lakeland. Newspapers 
has failed to give the names of the . 
Lake County fair amateur- contest 
winners. No one was there to take 
a picture. We will never forget 
queens who walk In bathing suits 
See UPSERVICE page C6 



Wild Bird Center 

For your enjoyment of backyard birds.™ 
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LIPSERVICE UkdANtl Newspapers ScpTCMb» 50, 1 994 



LIPSERVICE 

It's tNe T/\Lk oF tJhe town 

Get h off you r ch est (.708) 225-*8077 





Newspapers 






From page C5 . 

and walk In $5,000 evening gowns, 
and cite prepared speeches. The 
junior division winners were Kaja 
Mllovanovlc, third, Amber Dusak, 
second, and Angela Beltchenko, 
first. The senior division finalist was 
Christina Vannl. It Is too bad the 
paper finds this matter to be too 
minute to put It In the paper, Isn't It 
sad. 

Fireworks ratings 

Now that the summer Is oyer, I 
wanted to rate this summer's fire- 
works. Vernon Hills' were the great- 
est and Great America's were the 
worst. The parking was terrible and 
the fireworks were worse. Island 
Lake gets four stars, and Buffalo 
Grove has some good one's. Taste 
of Chicago's were, wonderful. 
Venetian Night In Fox Lake rated a 
fabulous. Have a great fall every- 
body. 

Gumshoes? 

Here It Is again, another situation 
with the Gurnee School District. 
Where were their minds when they 
decided to let Junior kids chew 
gum In school? Now, my daughter 
had come home with gum on her 
shoes. On the bus they were throw- 
ing gum all over the bus. Last year 
they were having trouble with chil- 
dren on the bus, and now they let 
them have gum. I can't believe It. 
I know they didn't do this at 
Woodland Grade School. This Is 
the same school that suspends stu- 
dents for not bringing their pencils 
to class. It Is a wonder how our kids 
come out of there with the ability 
to think for themselves. That school 
Is so wlshy washy. 

Football tax 

This Is a question for the Gurnee 
Park District. After reading the 
booklet- on what Is available, It 
seems to me that the substance of 
football Is left out. I don't know 
why our park district cannot pro- 
vide football when It is available In 
North Chicago. Waukegan and 
Round Lake have It? Does this 
mean the taxes we pay In Gurnee 
are not enough to provide this ser- 
vice, but they are enough at these 
other communities? Warren 
Township also provides football. 
Where Is all the money? 

Unhappy employee 

The teacher from Grayslake School 
District 46 Is not alone. I too, am an 
unhappy employee. Why have we 
tost so many good teachers 1hls 
year? Has anyone asked these ex- 
teachers why they left? There Is a 
lot of back-stabbing going on. 

Keep your smell 

I live in an apartment complex In 
Antloch. I am a nonsmoker. 
Periodically I like to open my win- 
dows to get some fresh air. Do you 
know what it Is like to open your 
windows and get the stench of cig- 
arettes wafting up Into your apart- 
ment? I realize you people .stink 
and don't care about your health 
and others' but If you want to 
brealhe your own smoke, then turn 
on your air conditioner. Then your 
smell won't Intrude on others. 

Abusive engineers 

I agree with the callers who don't 
like train horns. Since the petition 
against them started, the engi- 
neers have become more abusive 
with their horns. It has been louder 
and longer. This Is their way of get- 
ting back at us for complaining. I 
don't think they should hold their 
horns all the way through town. 
They should only blow them at 
crossings. They can follow their 
regulations and still be considerate 
too. 



Halloween scrooge 

This Is In response to 'Toying 
around' and 'Not toying around.' 
You sound like someone who was 
lucky enough to have 
"Architectural Digest' over to do a 
photo shoot of your home. 
Probably not though. You are 
probably someone who hasn't had 
children or grandchildren lately. 
The two major manufacturers of 
children's toys are making them In 
bright colors that children like. They 
are also colors that children are 
learning the names of. These are 
Just a few of the ugly toys that I will 
not have to throw away. I will Just 
sell them at a garage sale and put 
the money away for college or buy 
basketball hoops so we can con- 
tinue to drive you crazy. I would 
suggest If our toys bother you then 



you should move to a senior com- 
plex or a mobile home park. I bet 
you are the type who leaves the 
lights off and doesn't answer the 
door on Halloween either. 

Nobody's perfect 

This Is In response to your editorial 
note on the Upservlce call titled 
'Hammer time,' You neglected to 
menllon that 'Hammer time' was 
called In Aug. 26, before your Sept. 
2 article. 

Only winning 

I read the last bit that someone 
wrote and their son went to the 
Warren Township Center to play 
football. I've been around for a 
long time, back when It was the 
Gagewood Packers. It stinks now. 



The coaches are only concerned 
about winning. I have seen a 
championship game played In 
weather so bad, animals would not 
even be out In It. Parents were 
yanking their kids out and taking 
'them out because they were 
bench sitters. All the fathers who 
were coaches and their kids get all 
the skill positions. There Is some- 
thing wrong here. Gurnee Park 
District should have Its own football 
team. A lot of parents feel this 
way. 



Keep going 



This is In response to the Halnesvllle 
Police Department. I thought 
police officers are to be more kind 
than those officers are, There was 
an accident on Rte 120. My niece 
was on her way to work. She was 



fold to go down a street as a 
detour. She did and couldn't find 
a way out. She came back and 
asked the police officer for some 
assistance, He bluntly said to her 
'Keep going.' She had to find her 
way to work.. 

Pageant psycho 

This Is In response to the 'One little 
cutle' call and Its responses. Has It , 
ever occurred to anyone that. the 
person who made that call In the 
first place Isn't even a parent, of 
one of the contestants, and 
Instead Is a psycho who makes up 
titles for her little, daughters? 
Nobody ever sald'the little miss 
shouldn't have won, but the 
emcee should watch what he Is 
saying when little ears aw listening. 
See LIPSERVICE page C7 



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It's tNe taUc oF tIhe town 

Get it ofF youi* cNest (708) 225-8075 



From page C6 

Welcome tax 

I am a life-long Lake County resi- 
dent and would like to respond to 
the whlners and the train noises. 
Welcome to the neighborhood. It Is 
too bad you had to move here 
from wherever you came from. 
That Is why I don't live near the 
tracks. Also, welcome to higher 
taxes. 



Lakeland 

9r Newspapers 



Traffic stop 



This Is to 'Losing sleep.' It Is obvious 
you bought a house close to the 
tracks. It Is a nice expensive one , I'll 
bet. If you didn't like It, you should- 
n't have bought one close to the 
tracks. The trains run at night so the 
traffic Isn't fouled up all day long. 

God exists 

I wanted to totally agree with the 
call regarding Christianity. Why are 
people.'so condemning of God? 
He does exist. How do I know? I am 
alive. Look at our beautiful things 
of nature around us. God made It . 
all. When you finally can't take It 
anymore, Jesus will forgive your sins 
and come Into your life. Let's put 
God back Into our dally lives. With 
God In our lives, there would be less 
violence, less gangs and structured 
families. So when you read this 
don't think It Is another nut or Jesus 
freak. It Is Just me telling you how 
great God has been to me. 

Backyard dump 

/This Is regarding 'Toying around.' 
What Is wrong with that person for 
complaining about toys In other 
Ifpeople's backyards? If people 
e . throw the' toys away, then maybe 
' they should throw 1hem In this per- 
son's yard. 

Which was first? 

I am curious about the people who 
are complaining about the train 
horns at night. Tell me. did they 
move there before the railroad 
tracks were laid? 

A different drummer 

Congratulations to the organizers 
of the Undenfest Parade for allow- 
ing people from the Waukegan 
Christian Fellowship Church to 
march In the parade. The pastor Is 
serving time for sexually abusing 
teenage boys. What a great 
example of forgiveness and toler- 
ance, not to mention a great Inspi- 
ration to our community youth. 
However, I prefer to march to the 
beat of a different drummer. 

Train noise 

I read the Upservlce call 'Worthless 
petition.' That person said If the law Is 
repealed, they hoped the ones 
responsible for the petition are the 
next ones to get hit. Obviously this 
person doesn't live by the tracks. In 
the past year they have become a 
lot worse. They used to honk once. 
Now they hold on the horns for two 
minutes. You can't talk on the phone 
or hear the television. Who do we 
call? It Is really getting out of hand. 

Bright teachers 

l am calling about the back-to- 
school night at the Antloch High 
School. I was pleasantly surprised 
at air the teachers I met. They are 

. doing a wonderful Job of trying to 
educate our children. They were 
bright and enthusiastic. My neigh- 
bors said the same things. We have 
heard so many negative things 
about the high school. We have a 
wonderful group of people working 
there.' .Let's remember that at the 

*. next referendum. 



Brainless 



This Is In response to the person who 
called about the kids who tried to 



cross Lake Michigan In a boat, t 
am sorry that they And those' peo- 
ple are their only real friends and 
that they were good kids. They 
probably did not think of any reper- 
cussions for what they did. They 
probably wanted to do It for the 
publicity. The Ihlng they will proba- 
bly get Is Jail time and heavy fines. 
Did they ever stop to think they 
could have drowned, and all the 
problems this would cause? What 
about the grief Ihelr parents woutd 
suffer? Shame on those kids. They 
probably don't have any brains or 
expectations In their own lives. 
They obviously did not have any- 
thing better to do. Get a life. 

Hooray Jaycees 

I wanted to. call In and congratu- 
late Ihe Antloch Jaycees. It seems 
they are always doing something 
for our town. I took my son to the 
circus. It was very affordable. They 
also sponsored some children to go 
to camp. They delivered Christmas 
presents to people who were finan- 
cially strapped. They also made 
calls to the school children during 
the Christmas season. Keep up the 
good work. It doesn't seem any- 
thing else gets done in the town 
except by the Antloch Jaycees. 

No butts 

I want to make a comment on the 
smokers who throw their cigarette 
butts anywhere but In the trash 
containers. I noticed In the parking 
lot at the Orchard Medical Clinic In 
Antloch that some people dump 
their cigarette butts from their car 
ashtray onto the black top. The 
sidewalk by Jewel Is covered with 
them. The filters don't deteriorate. 
They last forever. Some get. on 
lawns and get cut up to make a 
bigger mess. I call It first class IrMer- 
bugglng with no respect for others 
or to keep America beautiful. 

Worthwhile petition 

This Is to 'Worthless petition' regard- 
ing the sounding of train horns. 
Evidently this person does not live 
near a train. They come through at 
all hours of the night and blast their 
horns from Rollins Rd all the way to 
Rte 173. Some of them are contin- 
uously blowing them. Villages do 
hove control of the horns In their vil- 
lage. If they have crossing gates at 
an Intersection, a train horn Is not 
necessary. It does take a petition. 
Keep up your good work. 



Grumpy old people 

I'd like to know what the problem Is 
with people who have play sets In 
the backyard. At least my children 
are at my home, safe and sound, 
where I know where they are at. 
They are not In your yard bothering 
you. As for brightly colored toys, 
you obviously have no children 
and have not been to the store 
lately. That Is all there Is to buy. I'm 
sorry they are ugly to you, but there 
Is not much we can do about It. 
These play sets are better than let- 
ting Wds run around town unsuper- 
vised. These toys will not be thrown 
away after my kids are done with 
them. If the toy Is not broken we 
give them to other Wds who aren't 
fortunate enough to be able to 
afford them. You are probably one 
who also complains about kids run- 
ning around town Instead of being 
at home. You are ornery and 
grumpy old people who apparent- 
ly don't like children. 

Bear fort 

We have been season ticket hold- 
ers to the Chicago Bears for years. 
I have a solution for them If Mike 
McCaskey will listen to me. Try to 
get some land at Fort Sheridan and 
' tell the Chicago Park District 'We're 
moving. Forget about It." 



Sink or swim 

I read the story about the 
Cambridge Homes wetlands viola- 
tions, then the follow up that the 
Army Corps of Engineers had 
made a mistake. I still have to 
wonder why development Is 
allowed on an 80 acre site when 
only half of tt Is developable land. 
When those areas flood, these 
people want to declare It a disas- 
ter area and federal aid. That Is my 
money. Let's be clear about this— 
wetlands are swamps and nothing 
more. If you are someone who 



chooses to buy your home In a 
flood plain, you can sink or swim. 

Just wait 

This Is to all you people already 
griping about the Antloch High 
School referendum next spring. If 
you continue, you are going to be 
blue In the face because you ain't 
seen nothln' yet. Housing In 
Antloch High School District 1 17 has 
not even begun to reach the mas- 
sive growth proportions already 
being felt In Graystake and Round 
Lake. Those schools are finding. 



with the popular tax cap firmly 
entrenched, that business by refer- 
endum Is becoming a way of life. 
How Is this school going to operate 
when there are even, more stu- 
dents coming Into the district than 
there are now? I'm not sure If I am 
for or against the referendum quite 
yet, but It is clear from some of the 
Upservlce calls that I have a better 
perspective on the world than 
some. In fact, I would be surprised 
If half the callers to Upservlce In 
general have ever left the borders 
of precious Lake County. 




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£*JUL faJUsty 




Several suggestion for planting shady groundcover 



G: Wo have a very shady condition 
where we'd like to plant some ground- 
cover or shrubs, or anything you could 
suggest for our gardens. 

A: Some suggestions for shady gar- 
dens are: 
Groundcovers 

Ajuga genevensls— Carpet Bugle. 
The foliage forms a rosette at the 
plant's base. Blue flower spikes In late 
April. Other Ajuga reptans are the 
"Silver Beauty," "Atropurpurea" 
"Burgundy Glow." The Ajuga reptans 
Burgundy Glow has shtny leaves with a 
white and pink variegation. It spreads 
by runners. The blue flower appears on 
a spike about six Inches tall and 
appears In April and May. A very hardy, 
easy to grow plant. 

The Euonymus offers many varieties 
of value to the shade garden. The 
Euonymus fortunel "Coloratus"— 
Purpleleaf Wlntercreeper Is a spreading 
broadleaf evergreen widely used. The 
glossy green foliage turns purple In the 
winter months. Helps to control erosion 
In gardens. Euonymus Is also quite 
attractive on stone walls when allowed 
to climb on. The Hedera helix 
"Bulgarica," "Thorndale" are a spread- 
ing evergreen groundcover that roots 
where they touch soil. They need moist, 
organic soil to grow In a healthy, vigor- 
ous manner. 

Pachysandra termlnalls Is another 
spreading evergreen groundcover. It 
spreads by underground stems and 
does produce white flowers In spring. 
Once again, It prefers a moist, organic 
soil content. The *Green Carpet" Is a 
cultlvar of the Japanese Spurge and Is 
a bit more deeper green and com- 
pact. It will also spread by underground 
runners. Since this plant grows In a 
stolonlferous manner, it protects soils 
from erosion In a sloping garden. A 
landscape designer's dream plant, cre- 
ating function as well as aesthetics In a 
garden. 

The Vlnca minor— Periwinkle, or myr- 
tle, as some call It, Is another spreading 



evergreen groundcover with shiny 
green foliage that produces a violet- 
blue flower In May. This plant spreads by 
above-ground runners. Will perform In 
heavy shade as well as full sun. Does 
require moist, but well-drained organic 
soils. 

Some hardy cultivars of the Vlnca 
minor are "Albla," a white flowered 
form that exhibits a deep green, glossy 
foliage; the "Atropurpurea," a reddish- 
purple flower and one of our favorites; 
"Bowles," which has deeper blue flow- 
ers than the common periwinkle and a 
glossier foliage. 

At last count, with a friend of mine, 
we had over 70 perennials that could 
grow In the shade. This does Include Ihe 
Hostas, Asthbes and ferns, which helps 
with all of their cultivars. One thing that 
stands out In my mind Is the need for 
well-drained, organic soils for most of 
these plants. Remembering that the 
health of the plant starts from the 
ground on up. 
Shrubs for shady conditions 

The Euonymus family has many 
upright varieties that can grow from 
three feet tail to 15 to 18 feet when 
crawling on a wall or fence. 

The Euonymus fortunel "Carrier" Is an 
evergreen shrub with glossy, green 
foliage that often produces an orange 
fruit. The Euonymus fortunel "Sarcoxle" 
will spread about four feet wide as well 
ad 4 feet In height. Can be sheared to 
form a shrub border. Foliage will turn a 
bronze-red color In the fall. The 
Fothergllla gardenll shows seasonal 
Interest with bottle brush-like white 
blooms in the spring. In the fall, the 
foliage turns orange and red, and 
adapts to either sun or shade locations. 

The Hamemells vernalls: spring 
blooming Witchhazel blooms In March 
with fragrant gold flowers. This shrub 
becomes more beautiful with age. The 
fall blooming Witchhazel, Hamamells 
virglnlana has light yellow blossoms, 
flowers In October and also gets better 
with age. I'd like to see this plant used 



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more In a shade garden. 

The Symphorlcarpos vulgaris, 
"Coralberry: Is a delicate leafed shrub 
showing coral colored berries through 
winter. Tolerates dense shade and Is a 
nice bank planting shrub. Most of the 
Taxus varieties also will tolerate heavy 
shade, however require well-drained 
soils for proper growth conditions. A 



specimen. Viburnum prunlfollum stands 
out nicely In a shade garden as Its hori- 
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eye. The flower Is a creamy-white flat- 
topped blossom that appears In spring. 
In the fall, a black, edible fruit 
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ScpTeMbcft 10, 1994 LvkelANd Newspapers FALL FOLIAGE 









Beautify yards by attracting various song birds 



From the simplest 
backyards to the 
most complete of 
gardens, any land- 
scape setting can be 
made far more 
beautiful by the pre- 
sence of singing 
birds. Attracting an 
assortment of color- 
ful birds to your lawn 
Is an effortless project 
that the entire family 
can enjoy. All that It 
Involves Is the' hang- 
ing of a prefllled plastic bird feeder. 

Prefllled feeders" such as the Easy 
Feeder from Easy Gardener, invite a 
wide variety of colorful birds to visit your 
yard year-round. This Is because feed- 
ers like the Easy Feeder come stocked 
with the appropriate mixture of seeds 
and grains. They are reflllabie and recy- 
clable and can be found In any garden 
center or hardware store. Such prefllled 
feeders are a realistic alternative to 
decorative, large and often very 
expensive bird feeders that often adorn 
avid bird watchers' properties. The Easy 
Feeder not'only brightens up your land- 
scape, It also provides a healthy source 
of food, which Is often much needed 
by birds, especially during the winter 
months. Simply hang it In a place con- 
venient for observation, out of the 
reach of the neighborhood cat. 




The Easy 

Feeder Is also perfect 
■ for home owners 
who want to enjoy 
the benefits of hav- 
ing feathered friends 
without having, to 
work so hard. It 
comes ready-to-use, 
Is durable and is light 
enough for ' cNldren 
to hang. Such feedr 
ers are also a logical 
choice ' because 
they dispense seed 
mix only when needed, and the plastic 
shell easily protects the food from rain, 
wind,- snow and contamination by bird 
waste. 
Lot the children be In charge 

Bird feeders make for great educa- 
tional projects for children. A child who 
Is given the responsibility of choosing, 
the location of the bird feeder, as well 
as hanging It, is likely to take a real Inter- 
est In the different species of birds that 
frequent the feeding spot. Armed with 
a bird guide or encyclopedia, your 
child will be Identifying the feasting 
birds In your yard In no time. Your child 
can subsequently take credit for, as well 
as explain the new bird retreat located 
on your property to family and friends. 
Bird varieties 

Being able to Identify the bird at your 
feeder can serve as a source of pride 



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for people of all ages and Interests, not 
Just for children. The most commonly 
sighted bird at a typical feeder Is a 
robin. They are easily Identified by their 
deep colored red breast. What Is not as 
widely known Is that they can nest In 
any of the various terrains of this coun- 
try. From the ocean coasts to the peaks 
of, mountains, robins are at home. 

Blue Jays also seem to flock to bird 
feeders In great numbers. They crave 
the sunflower seeds found In the Easy 
Feeder. Their vibrant colors and distinc- 
tive markings make them easy to spot. It 
Is, In fact, more difficult to take your eyes 
off a blue Jay than It Is to find one. Doves, 
cardinals, goldfinches and brown head- 
ed cowblrds are other types of birds that 
will become common sights to the 
owner of a simple bird feeder. 
Birds speak too 

Birds are unquestionably' beautiful 
creatures. They also flaunt a variety of 



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Interesting and often soothing sounds. 
The different pitches and tones are 
often enjoyed by homeowners as 
background noise. But, they can also 
be understood for what they truly are: 
Forms of communication. For example, 
short fierce bursts serve to signal other 
birds of Impending danger, whereas a 
strong piercing cry serves to ward off 
other birds and establish a territory. A. 
male bird might attempt to attract a 
potential mate by singing a rich, sweet 
song. All of these different calls are 
pleasant sounding, and at the same 
time, they can also serve as a fascinat- 
ing reference to the trained ear. 

Now that you know how a simple 
bird feeder or two can turn your yard 
Into an educational sanctuary bursting 
with song birds while making It a far 
more beautiful locale, why not take 
the time to feed a bird and beautify 
your yard? 






9 BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UIceIanc! Newspapers StprcMbcit JO, 1994 






i 



LEGAL NOTICES 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Two Horse Trading Co. 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 36696 Lake 
Rd., Inglestde, IL 60041; 
Rte, 45 & Rte. 120, 
Grayslake, IL, 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Wayne A. 
Carlson, 36696 Lake Rd., 
Ingleside, IL 60041. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the 
undersigned Intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Wayne A. Carlson 

The foregoing instrument 
" was acknowledged before 
me by the person(s) 
intending to conduct the 
business this September 
23 1994. 

' OFFICIAL SEAL 

Beverly McAdams 

Deputy County Clerk 

Received: Sept. 23, 1994 

Linda lanuzi Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0994E-185-FL 

September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 

October 14, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
MAG Consultants 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 522 Kingston 
Blvd., McHenry, IL 60050. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Michael A. 
Gallinati, 522 Kingston 
Blvd., McHenry, IL 60050. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to certify that the 
undersigned Intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Michael A. Gallinati 
September 21, 1994 

The foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before 
me by the person(s) 
intending to conduct the 
business this September 
21 1994. 

* OFFICIAL SEAL 

Eva M. Rivera 

Deputy County Clerk 

Received: Sept. 21 , 1 994 

Linda lanuzi Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0994E-181-FL 

September 30, 1994 

' October 7, 1994 

October 14, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Sunrise Sen/ices 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 35 S. Holly, Fox 
Lake, tL 60020. . 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Robin Ward, 
35 S. Holly, Fox Lake, IL 
60020. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location's) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Robin M. Ward 
August 29, 1994 

The foregoing instrument 
was acknowledged before 
me by the person(s) 
intending to conduct the 
business this August 29, 
1994. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Elaine C, Spangenberg 

Notary Public 

Received: Sept. 9, 1994 

Linda lanuzi Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0994D-177-FL 

September 23, 1994 

September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Longshot Press 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 35321 N. 
Sheridan Dr., Ingleslde, IL 
60041. 

NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PER-SON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Darlene 
Curclo-Elsbury, 35321 N. 
Sheridan Dr., Ingleslde, IL 
60041. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the 
undersigned Intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
locatlon(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Darlene Curcic-Elsbury 
September 10, 1994 

The foregolng.lnstrument 
was acknowledged before 
me by the person(s) 
intending to conduct the 
business this September 
10, 1994. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Elsie M. Farris 

Notary Public 

Received: Sept. 12, 1994 

Linda lanuzi Hess 

. Lake County Clerk 

0994D-169-FL 

September 23, 1994 

September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Mystique Merchant 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS iS TO BE CON- 
DUCTED OR TRANSACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1323 
Juneway Terr., Round Lake Beach, IL; P.O. Box 547, 
Round Lake, IL. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR RESIDENCE AD- 
DRESSES) OF THE PERSON(S) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: Barbara 
Miller, 1323 Juneway Terr., Round Lake Beach, IL 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to certify that the undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named business from the location(s) 
Indicated and that the true or real full name(s) of the 
person{s) owning, conducting or transacting the 
business are correct as shown. 
Barbara Miller 
September 6, 1994 

The foregoing instrument was acknowledged before me 
by the person(s) intending to conduct the business this 



September 6, 1994. 



OFFICIAL SEAL 

Le Roy Wiese 

Notary Public 

Received: September 12, 1994 

Linda lanuzi Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0994D-167-RL 

September 23, 1994 

September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

THE BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES OF 

THE ROUND LAKE AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT 

LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
ORDINANCE NO. 94-9-1 

COMBINED ANNUAL BUDGET AND APPROPRIATION ORDINANCE 
FOR LIBRARY PURPOSES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1994/iS 
WHEREAS, the Illinois Municipal Budget Law, 50 ILCS 
.330/1, et sag ., as amended, requires Illinois municipal 
corporations to adopt a combined annual budget and 
appropriation ordinance specifying the objects and pur- 
poses of expenditures; and the Illinois Public Library 



District Act, 75 ILCS 16/30-85 and 75 ILCS 16/35-25, pro- 
vides procedures for the passage of a budget and appro- 
priation ordinance and a tax levy ordinance; and 

WHEREAS, pursuant to the above statutes, a budget 
and appropriation ordinance has been prepared in tenta- 
tive form at the designation of this Board, and has been 
made available for public inspection at least thirty (30) 
days prior to final action, and a public hearing on said 
budget and appropriation ordinance was held on August 
17, 1994 prior to final action hereon, notice of which hear- 
ing was published on July 16. 1994, being more than thir- 
ty (30) days prior to the hearing, in a newspaper pub- 
lished within the District; 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the Board 
of Library Trustees of the Round Lake Area Public Library 
District, Lake County, Illinois, as follows: 

Section 1 . The following budget containing an estimate 
of all receipts of said Library District, and of the expendi- 
tures therefrom, be and the same hereby is adopted as 
the budget for said District for the fiscal year beginning 
July 1, 1994, and ending June 30, 1995, and the same 
sums are hereby appropriated as necessary to defray the 
said expenses and liabilities of this Library District, for the 
objects and purposes indicated, for said fiscal year. 
I. LIBRARY FUND 

A. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS: 

Cash on hand at beginning of fiscal year $205,833.00; 
Property Tax Revenues 543,768.00; Personal Property 
Replacement Tax 4,900.00; Fines 7,400.00; Copy 
Machine 4,700.00; Lost/Damaged Materials 1,000.00; 
Gifts 100.00; Grants 34,000.00; Interest 20,500.00; Rent 
17,277.00; Impact Fees 4,000.00; III Income 100.00; 
Miscellaneous 500.00. CASH AVAILABLE FOR APPRO- 
PRIATION: $844,078.00. 

B. APPROPRIATIONS FOR ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES: 

1. PERSONNEL 

Salaries (Librarians) $160,000.00; Salaries (Support 
Staff) 150,000.00; Intermittent Labor 1,000.00; 
Recruitment 2,000.00; Group Insurance 31,000.00; Staff 
Recognition 2,000.00; Travel/Training - Staff/Board 
5,000.00; Membership - Staff/Board 2,000.00. TOTAL - 
PERSONNEL: $373,000.00. 

2. LIBRARY MATERIALS: 

Books $120,000.00; Periodicals 12,000.00; AV 
Material 20,000.00; Vertical File 1,000.00; 
Software/Microforms 9,000.00; Processing 

Supplies/Services 12,000.00; Replacement {III, Rep) 
1,000.00; III Fees 1,000.00. TOTAL - LIBRARY MATERI- 
ALS: $176,000.00. 

3. BUILDING COSTS: 

Utilities $55,000.00; Custodial Supplies 10,000.00; 
Building Maintenance 25,000.00. TOTAL - BUILDING 
COSTS: $90,000.00. 

4. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES: 

Legal Fees $5,000,00; Legal Expenses 2,000.00; 
Accounting Fees 6,000.00; Payroll Processing 2,000.00; 
Consulting Services 2,000.00. TOTAL - PROFESSIONAL 
SERVICES: $17,000,00. 

5. PROMOTION AND PUBLICITY: 
Programming $8,000.00; Newsletter 7,000.00; Public 

Relations 4,000.00; Survey 9,000.00. TOTAL - PROMO- 
TION AND PUBLICITY: $28,000.00. 

6. LIBRARY OPERATION: 

Office Supplies $10,000.00; Postage 5,000.00; 
Equipment Rental 1,000.00; Telephone 6,000.00; Office 
Equipment Maintenance 4,000.00. TOTAL - LIBRARY 
OPERATION: $26,000.00. 
. 7, AUTOMATION: $65,000.00. 

8. CAPITAL OUTLAY: $6,000.00 

9. CONTINGENCIES: $2,000.00. 

10. TRANSFER-SPECIAL RESERVE: $15,000.00. 
TOTAL LIBRARY FUND EXPENSES $798,000.00 
ESTIMATED CASH ON HAND 6/30/95 $46,078.00 

II. ILLINOIS MUNICIPAL RETIREMENT FUND 

A. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS: 

Cash on hand at beginning of fiscal year $32,550.00; 
Property tax revenues 34,237.00; Interest 1,450.00. 
TOTAL CASH AVAILABLE $68,237.00. 

B. ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES: $40,000.00 

CASH ON HAND 6/30/95 $28,237.00 

A. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS: 

Cash on hand at beginning of fiscal year $28,781.00; 
Property tax revenues 24,167.00; Replacement Tax 
210.00; Interest 1,250.00. TOTAL CASH AVAILABLE 
$54,408.00. 

B. ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES: $35,000.00 

CASH ON HAND 6/30/95 $19,408.00 
IV. AUDIT FUND 

A. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS: 

Cash on hand at beginning of fiscal year $4,610.00; 
Property tax revenues -0-; Interest 160.00. TOTAL CASH 
AVAILABLE $4,770.00. 

B. ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES: $3,000.00. 

CASH ON HAND 6/30/95 $1,770.00 

V. LIABILITY INSURANCE AND RISK MANAGEMENT FUND 

A. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS: 

Cash on hand at beginning of fiscal year $48,436.00; 
Property tax revenues -0-;' Interest 1,600.00; Rent 
1,128.00. TOTAL CASH AVAILABLE $51,164.00. 

B. ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES: $25,000.00, 

CASH ON HAND 6/30/95 $26,164.00 ■ 

VI. BUILDING. EQUIPMENT AND MAINTENANCE FUND 

A, ESTIMATED RECEIPTS: 

Cash on hand at beginning of fiscal year $25,181.00; 
Property tax revenues 40,279.00; Interest 1,400.00. 
TOTAL CASH AVAILABLE $66,860.00. 

B. ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES: 

Custodial salaries $15,000.00; Cleaning service 
20,000.00; Transfer - Special Reserve 25,000.00. TOTAL 
EXPENDITURES: $60,000.00. 

CASH ON HAND 6/30/95 $6,860.00 
VII. SPECIAL RESERVE FUND 

A. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS: 

Cash on hand at beginning of fiscal year $113,060.00; 
Interest 5,200.00; Transfers 41,365.00; Rent 1,000.00; 
Insurance Refund 6,960,00. TOTAL CASH AVAILABLE 
$167,585,00. 

B. ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES: $167,585.00. 

CASH ON HAND 6/30/95 $-0- 

VIII. CONSTRUCTION FUND/CAPITAL IMPROVE. 

MENTS 

A. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS: 

Cash on hand at beginning of fiscal year $51,123.00- 
Interest 1,700.00; Rent 1,679.00. TOTAL CASH AVAIL- 
ABLE $54,502.00. 



II. 
III. 
IV. 
V. 

VI. 



IX. 
X. 
XI. 



B. ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES: $54,502.00. 

CASH ON HAND 6/30/95 $-0- 

IK. BOND AND INTEREST FUND 

A. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS: 

Cash on hand at beginning of fiscal year $104,309,00; 
Property tax revenues 259,800.00; Interest 5,700.00* 
TOTAL CASH AVAILABLE $369,809.00. 

B. ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES: 

Bond Payment $253,075.00; Bank Fees 1,500.00 
TOTAL ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES $254,575.00. 
CASH ON HAND 6/30/95 $11 5,234.00 
X SPECIAL TRUSTEE FUND 

A. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS: 

Cash on hand at beginning of fiscal year $31,721.00- 
Interest 1,200.00; TOTAL CASH AVAILABLE 
$32 921 00. 

B. ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES: $20,000.00. 

CASH ON HAND 6/30/95 $12,921.00 
XL WORKING CASH FUND 
A. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS: 
Cash on hand at beginning of fiscal year $135,143.00. 
ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES: $135,143.00. 

CASH ON HAND 6/30/95 .$-0- 

Section 2 . There is hereby appropriated from the taxes 
to be levied for the fiscal year and other sources of rev- 
enue: 

I. LIBRARY FUND - $798,000.00 

IMRF 40,000.00 

FICA FUND 35,000.00 

AUDIT FUND 3,000.00 

LIABILITY INSURANCE AND RISK 
MANAGEMENT FUND 25,000.00 

BUILDING, EQUIPMENT AND 
MAINTENANCE FUND 60,000.00 

VII. SPECIAL RESERVE FUND 167,585.00 

VIII. CONSTRUCTION FUND/CAPITAL 

IMPROVEMENTS 54,502.00 

BOND AND INTEREST FUND 254,575.00 

SPECIAL TRUSTEE FUND 20,000.00 

WORKING CASH FUND 135J42J20 

AGGREGATE APPROPRIATED $1 ,592,605.00 

Section 3 .' All unexpended balances of proceeds 
received annually from public library taxes not in excess 
of statutory limits may be transferred to the Special 
Reserve Fund, heretofore established according to 75 
ILCS 16/40-5, pursuant to plans developed and adopted 
by this Board and said unexpended balances shall be 
accumulated in this fund for the purpose of erecting a 
new library building, purchasing a site for the same, or 
building an addition thereto, or furnishing necessary 
equipment therefor. The Board further appropriates all 
sums accumulated in said fund or transferred thereto dur- 
ing the 1994/95 fiscal year subject to compliance with 
statutory procedures set forth above. 

Section 4 . Except as otherwise provided by law, no fur- 
ther appropriations shall be made at any time within such 
fiscal year, provided that this Board may from time to time 
make transfers between the various items in any fund not 
affecting the total amount appropriated, or appropriations 
in excess of those authorized by the budget in order to 
meet an immediate and unforeseen emergency by a two- 
thirds (2/3) vote of the trustees present and voting, as 
provided by 75 ILCS 16/30-90, and this Board may 
amend this budget and appropriation ordinance from time 
to time by the same procedure as prescribed by statute 
for the original adoption of a budget and appropriation 
ordinance; provided that nothing in this section shall be 
construed to permit transfer between funds required by 
law to be kept separate. Any remaining balances after the 
close of the fiscal year up to twenty percent (20%) of the 
appropriation shall be available until August 30th for the 
authorization of payment of obligations incurred prior to 
the close of the fiscal year, and until September 30th for 
the payment of such obligations, and any remaining bal- 
ances shall be available for the transfer to special reserve 
to be accumulated. 

Section 5 , Pursuant to 75 ILCS 16/35-5, the amount to 
be included in the 1994/95 levy for the Building and 
Equipment Fund in the maximum amount of $52,000,00 
is subject to a ceiling of .02 percent of the value of all of 
the taxable property in this district, as equalized or 
assessed, and was authorized by resolution passed on 
November 17, 1993, and published on November 26, 
1993, in a secular newspaper of general circulation with- 
in this library district. 

Section 6 . This Ordinance is passed pursuant to statu- 
tory authority and the Illinois Public Library District Act; 
the Illinois Municipal Budget Law; the Illinois Revenue 
Code, and other statutes hereunto appertaining. 

Section 7 . This Ordinance shall be in full force and 
effect from and after its passage, approval, and publica- 
tion, according to law, 

PASSED by the Board of Library Trustees and the 
Round Lake Area Public Library District, Lake County, 
Illinois, on this 21st day of September, 1994, by a vote of: 
AYES: Heppner, Kauffman, Martin, Pierce, Seminary, 
Warner 
NAYS: None 
ABSENT: Mitchell 
ATTEST: APPROVED: 

/s/ Linda Kauffman /s/ Kathleen S. Pierce 

Secretary President 

C ERTIFICATE 
I, Linda Kauffman, DO HEREBY CERTIFY that I am 
the duly elected, qualified, and serving secretary, and as 
such am the keeper of the books and records of The 
Board of Library Trustees of the Round Lake Area Public 
Library District, Lake County, Illinois; and 

I DO FURTHER CERTIFY that the above attached 
Ordinance No. 94-9-1: COMBINED ANNUAL BUDGET 
AND APPROPRIATION ORDINANCE FOR LIBRARY 
PURPOSES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1994/95 is a true 
and correct copy of said ordinance which was presented, 
passed, and recorded by said Board at their regular meet- 
ing, on Sept. 21, 1994, by a vote of: 
' AYES: Heppner, Kauffman, Martin, Pierce, Seminary, 
Warner 
NAYS: None 
ABSENT: Mitchell 
ABSTAINING: None 

DATED this 21 st day of September, 1994 
(SEAL) /s/ Linda Kauffman . 

Secretary, the Board of Library Trustees 
of the Round Lake Area Pi.blic Library 
District, Lake County, Illinois 

0994E-189-RL 
September 30, 1994 



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SipTEMb» 90, 1994 UkElANd Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE; 




PUBLIC NOTICE 

Affordable Self Storage 
will dispose of goods for 
non payment from: 

Unit No. 29 betonging to 
Jennifer R; Burke consist- 
ing of ' miscellaneous 
household Items. 

Disposal of the Items 
will take place at 
Affordable Self Storage, 
133 South Route 12, Fox 
Lake, IL 60020 on October 
6, 1994 at 10:00 a.m. 

0994D-175-FL 
September 23, 1994 
September 30, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
BID NOTICE 

Official notice Is hereby given that sealed bids will be 
received for a new 1995 7-passenger extended mini-van 
at Gurnee Park District offices, Viking Park, 4374 Grand 
Avenue, Gurnee, Illinois 60031 on October 14, 1994 at 
10:30 a.m. 

Specifications may be obtained at the above address 
or by calling the Park District office at (708) 623-7788. 

Bids wilt be awarded to the qualified bidder at the Park 
Board meeting on October 18, 1994. The Board of Park 
Commissioners of the Gurnee Park District has the right 
to accept or reject any or all bids. 
Christine Thompson, 0994E-182-Gen 

President September 30, 1994 

Board of Commissioners 
GURNEE PARK DISTRICT 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given that personal, household, and 
misc. Items belonging to: 

Walter Konak (Outdoor), 1899 Cedar Lake Rd., Round 
Lake Beach, IL 60073 (1 brown van). 

Tonya Young (Unit #78), Meadowbrook, Round Lake 
Beach, IL 60073. 

Dennis McGarry (Unit #73-B), 1 15 Gten St., Grayslake, 
IL 60030. 

Gloria Oliver {Unit #75-A), 145 Glen St., Grayslake, IL 
60030. 

Alan Bauschke (Unit #41), 550 Arbor, Round Lake 
Park, IL 60073. 

located at the E-Z Storage Facility, 100 S. Cedar Mound 
Rd., Round Lake Park, IL 60073 will be disposed of on 
October 8, 1994 at 9 a.m.' 0994E-192-RL 

September 30, 1994 
October 7, 1 994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NEWPORT ROAD DISTRICT 

Notice Is hereby given that sealed proposals will be 
received at the office of the NEWPORT TOWNSHIP clerk 
at 15280 Wadsworth Road, P.O. Box 336, Wadsworth, 
Illinois 60083, until 10:00 A.M., October 10, 1994, for the 
frrnishlng of approximately .80 miles of road paving. , 
Proposals shall be made on forms furnished by the 
Highway Commissioner and shall be addressed in a 
sealed envelope to Kevin Zupec, Newport Road District - 
Highway Commissioner, P.O. Box 336, Wadsworth, 
Illinois, 60083 'and shall be marked "Newport Road 
District Paving 1994". Further information regarding this 
letting may be obtained by contacting the Highway 
Commissioner at 708-336-9698. The Road District In 
accordance with the laws of the State of Illinois hereby 
notifies alt bidders that it will affirmatively Insure that the 
contract entered Into pursuant to advertisement will be 
awarded to the lowest responsible bidder without dis- 
crimination on the ground of race, color, or national origin. 
By Order of Kevin Zupec 
Newport Road District 
Highway Commissioner 

0994E : 188-Gen 
September 30, 1994 






~~ PUBLIC NOTICE 

- ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Department of School Finance 
Finance Section 
100 North First Street 
Springfield, Illinois 62777-0001 
Grass Lake School District 36 
26177 W. Grass Lake Rd., Antioch, IL 60002 
ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR PUBLICATION 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED June 30, 1994 
(Section 10-17 of the School Code) 
SIZE OF DISTRICT IN SQUARE MILES: 5.2; NUMBER OF ATTENDANCE CEN- 
TERS: 1; NUMBER OF CERTIFICATED EMPLOYEES: FULL-TIME 19; PART-TIME 3; 
NUMBER OF NON-CERTIFICATED EMPLOYEES: FULL-TIME 4; PART-TIME 8; 
AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE: 251.12; NUMBER OF PUPILS ENROLLED PER 
GRADE: KINDERGARTEN 43; FIRST 33; SECOND 25; THIRD 37; FOURTH 34; FIFTH 
26; SIXTH 21; SEVENTH 37; EIGHTH 27; SPECIAL 5; Total Elementary 288. TOTAL 
IN DISTRICT 288. 
TAX RATE BY FUND (IN %) 

EDUCATIONAL 78.95; OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE 8.96; WORKING CASH 
2.02; TRANSPORTATION 4.78; MUNICIPAL RETIREMENT 1.43; SOCIAL SECURITY 
1.01; FIRE PREVENTION AND SAFETY 2.02; SPECIAL EDUCATION .83. DISTRICT 
ASSESSED VALUATION: $46,677,282; ASSESSED VALUATION PER A.D.A. PUPIL 
$185,876.40. 

(ASSETS - VALUE OF CAPITAL ASSETS - BASIS OF VALUATION USED) Land - 
79,868 - Annual Financial Report; Buildings - 869,245 - Annual Financial Report; 
Equipment - 324,291 - Annual Financial Report. 

GROSS PAYMENT FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL 
Salary Range: Less Than $15,000 
K. Codilis, G. Everett, D. Norton 
Salary Range: $15,000-$24,999 

C. Carpenter. K. Krocza, K. Phillips, D. Rynes 
Salary Range: $25,000-$39,999 

C. Adams, S. BartJett, S. Boesdorfer, M. Bowen, T. Gavlin, S. Jones, J; Larson, R. 
Liss, S. Nolan, M. Pearl, N. Rubash, D. Tomei, G. Turk 
Salary Range: $40,000 and Over 

R. Bill, V. Mann - ttl i; 

GROSS PAYMENT FOR NON-CE RTIFICATED PERSONNEL 

Salary Range: Less Than $15,000 



3,476.56; 133 - Antioch Flooring: 
Asbestos Project Management 



H. Balmes, S. Gitday, D. Grandfield, T. Jonites, S. Kerby, N. Nava, P. Norton, P. 
Wagner 
Salary Range: $15,000-$24,999 

S. Anderson, G. Mtlowski, P. Reed 
Salary Range: $25,000-$39,999 

P. Harris 

VENDOR LISTING 

201 - Althoff Industries: 3,195.75; 140 - Ameritech: 
1,364.33; 297 - Apple Computer, Inc.: 6,673.30; 227 

2,782.00; 139 - AT&T Credit Corp.: 1 ,096.76; 81 - Awards by Kaydan: 1,133.13; 295 BG 
Electronics, Inc.: 1,487.20; 31 - Ruth Bill: 1,110.53; 128 - Burlington Wholesale: 
4,210.93; 292 - Calculators, Inc.: 1,018.00; 143 - Carey and Gelden Elect: 1,957.27; 149 

- Commonwealth Edison: 16,149.83; 121 - Country Companies Ins.: 17,644.25; 334 - 
Crocodile Pie: 1,389.11; 317 - Wayne Dieck & Co.: 2,700.00; 252 - Eastman Kodak 
Company: 4,403.44; 122 - Eastman Kodak Credit Corp.: 2,462.40; 249 - Elton 
Corporation: 3,634.29; 326 - Environmental Monitoring: 2,088.60; 39 - ETA: 1 ,051.13; 27 

- Forest School: 1,267.38; 24 - GLS/FBP/MCSA: 3,170.38; 82 - Golden Gumsey Dairy: 
5,672.47; 108 - Grass .Lake Activity: 3,978.22; 46 - Harcourt Brace Jovanovich: 
9,291.31; 130 - Hodges, Loizzi, Eisenhammer. 25,880.84; 16 - Horace Mann Insurance: 
8,881.00; 8 - Horace Mann Insurance: 2,449.00; 43 - Houghton Mifflin Co.: 6,375.31; 18 

- IEA-NEA: 6,387.17; 2 - IL Dept of Revenue: 18,167.96; 312 - IL Dir. of Employment 
Sec.: 5,720.00; 5 - IL Municipal Ret. Fund: 25,495.43; 17 - Imprest Fund: 4,909.86; 261: 
JK Enterprises: 1,729.00; 259 - J.S. Latta Co.: 4,186.01; 9 - Kemper Life Insurance: 
10,099.92; 164 - Roy T. Kiefer. 1,169.00; 48 - Lk. Co. Ed. Service Center. 4,252.37; 4 - 
Lake Co. Reading Recovery: 4,050.00; 41 Mac Millan/Mc Graw 'Hill: 2,009.01; 314 - 
MECC: 1,148.00; 260 - Midwest Transit Equipment: 22,085.11; 313 - Miracle Recreation 
Equip.: 22,054.00; 165 - National Guardian: 1,810.48; 162 -National School Bus Serv.: 
19,416.91f21 - NEA Money Market: 4,550.00; 126 -New Process Bakery: 1,121.35; 153 

- Northern Illinois Gas: 12,067.86; 100 - "Payroll": 617,070.08; 159 - Phillips 66 
Company; 4,297.07; 285 - Prairie State Associates: 4,443.98; 286 - The Psychological 
Corp.: 1,642.04; 323 - Reil Construction, Inc.: 27,554.00; 250 - R.J.L Nursery 
Landscap.: 1,350.00; 14 - Mr. Bill Schuett, Treasurer .49,506.86; 186 - S.E.D.O.L: 
56,774.28; 1 - State Bank of Antioch F: 92,214.61; 6 - State Bank of Antioch M: 
11,241.12; 3 - State Bank of Antioch S: 23,884.40; 324 - St Therese Corp. Health Sv: 
2,440.61; 96 - Sunrise Office Supply: 2,370.75; 10 - Teachers' Retirement Systm: 
56,560.91; 118 - Visa: 4,495.03; 137 - Waste Management of Lk. Co.: 2,340.60; 177 - 
Waukesha Food Service: 2,103.25; 20 - Kenneth C. Wierschsm: 1 v 800.00; 13 - 
Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue: 6,007.85; 34 - Zelle'rbach: 1,018.60. Total for 70 
Vendors; 1,289,540.00. 



INDIVIDUAL FUND BALANCE SHEETS June 30, 1994 



ASSETS 

CURRENT ASSETS (100) 

I.Cash 

Other Current Assets 

10. (Loan to Other Funds) 
11.T0TAL CURRENT ASSETS 
LIABILITIES AND 
FUND BALANCE 
CURRENT LIABILITIES 
10. Loan from Working Cash Fund 
17. TOTAL LIABILITIES 
IB. Reserved Fund Balance 
19. Unreserved Fund Balance 
21. TOTAL LIABILITIES 
AND FUND BALANCE 



ACCT. 
NO. 



EDUCATIONAL 



101-105 $240,725. 



199 



400 
434 

703 
704 



240,725. 



OPERATIONS 
AND MAINTENANCE 

$138,777. 



138,777. 



BOND 
AND INTEREST 

$17,807. ' 



17,607. 



TRANSPORTATION 
$103,594. 



10-3,594. 



MUNICIPAL RETIREMENT/ 
SOCIAL SECURITY 

$7,744. 



7,744. 



SITE AND CONSTRUCTICN/ 
CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT 



WORKING CASH 

$55,544. 

* 20,000. 
75,544. 



RENT 



FIRE PREVENTION 
AND SAFETY 

$34,137. 



34,137. 



36,412. 
204,313. 

240,725. 



7,124. 
131,653.- 

138,777, 



17,807. 
17,807. 





20,000, 




20,000. 


29,300. 


(7,604.) 


74,294. 


{4,652.) 



103,594 



7,744. 



75,544. 
75,544. 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS/REVENUES, DISBURSEMENTS/EXPENDITURES, OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES), AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES FOR THE YEAR ENDED June 30, 1994 



RECEIPTS/REVENUES 

1. Local Sources 1000 

2. Flow Through Revenue from 
One LEA to Another LEA 

3. Slate Sources 

4. Federal Sources 

5. TOTAL RECEIPTS/REVENUES 

DISBURSEMENTS/ 
EXPENDITURES 

6. Instruction 

7. Supporting Services 
9, Nonprogfammed Charges 

11. TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS/ 
EXPENDITURES 

12. Excess of Recess/Revenues 
Over (Under) Disbursements/ 
Expenditures 

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES ACCT. 
AND (USES) NO. 

1 3. Other Financing Sources 7000 

1 4. Other Financing (Uses) 8000 

15. TOTAL OTHER FINANCING 
SOURCES AND (USES) 

16. Excess of Recess/Revenues and 
Other Financing Sources Over (Under) 
DisbJExp, and Other Financing Uses 

17. FUND BALANCES -July 1,1993 

18. Other Changes in Fund Balances 
Increases (Decreases) 

19. FUND BALANCES -June 30, 1994 



875,693. 



2000 


200. 


3000 


122,873. 


4000 


32,695. 




1,031,461 


FUNCT. 




NO. 




1000 


636,821. 


2000 


425,459. 


.4000 


56,929. 



1,119,209, 



(87,748,) 



7,821. 



103,049. 



103,049. 



68,587. 



68,587. 



34,462. 



850. 



850, 



850. 



50,404. 



48,570, 
98,974. 



82,857. 



82,657. 



16,117. 



25,405. 



25,405. 



4,347. 
31,903, 



36,250. 



(10,845,) 



22,209. 



22,209, 



,,»•• 


(3,498,) 


(850.) 


(1,751.) 




7,821. ' 


(3,498.) 


(850.) 


(1,751.) 


• 


(79,927.) 
320,652. 


30,964. 
121,211. 


0. 
17,807. 


14,366. 

89,228. 


(10,845.) 
(1,411.) 


240,725. 


(13,398.) 
138,777. 


17,807. 


103,594. 


(12,256.) 



22,209. 

(1,722.) 
(1,722) 



20,487. 
55,057. 



75,544. 



34,137. 
34,137. 



21,359. 



21,359. 



620. 



620. 



20,739. 



20,739. 
0. 

13,398. 
34,137. 
0994E-186-FL 
September 30, 1994 




CLASSIFIED UldANd Newspapers Sepmtben JO, 1994 



OBITS/DEATH NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



$54,774 

96,581 

79 . 6 69, 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

GRANT TOWNSHIP 
ANNUAL TREASURER'S REPORT 
FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1994 
TOWN FUND 

FUND BALANCE APRIL 1, 1993 $171,262 

REVENUES RECEIVED 439,210 

LESS - EXPENDITURES -431.660 

FUND BALANCE MARCH 31, 1994 $178,812 

REVENUES: Property Taxes 342,768; Other 
Reimbursements 445; Block Grant Funds 70,700; 
Reimbursements from Pace 16,807; Interest Income 
8,490. 

EXPENDITURES: Joseph M. Alioto 5,556; American 
Municipal Software 8,430; Bark Associates 3,825; Betty 
J. Niemi 1 ,545; Bumham & Flower of Illinois 963; County 
of Lake 5,452; Cowen, Crowley & Nord, P.C. 1,003; Kay 
Derdeyn 4,973; Drake's Office Supply 11,416; David H. 
Ferrigan 5,556; Fox Lake State Bank 57,231; Fox Lake 
Fire Protection Distr. 5,000; Fox Lake Yellow Cab 4,867; 
Fox Lake Ace Hardware 1,784; Michael Francis 5,093; 
Gewalt-Hamiltoh Associates, Inc. 7,353; Gordon D. 
Kiesgen 2,186; Gordon Flesch Company, Inc. 1,419; 
Grant Twp Revenue Sharing Fund 1,068; Guardian Life 
Insurance Co. 29,315; Robert P. Hamm 5,556; I.M.R.F. 
27,937; IL Dir of Employment Security 686; Illinois Dept. 
of Revenue 5,156; Illinois Bell 52; Jack R. Kiesgen 1,000; 
Gordon D. Kiesgen 40,948; Jack R. Kiesgen 43,734; 
Lake County Circuit Clerk 108; Lake Cty. Dept. of Mgmt. 
Serv. 3,150; Liberty Logo-A-Gogo 1,955; Long Lake 
Lumber Company 172; Michael Francis 1,400; Major Hill 
Insurance Agency 4,225; Mutual Insurance Co. 2,615; 
Alberta Ann Miller 3,626; Molidor Insurance 1,330; 
Mosele & Associates, Inc. 76,241; Betty J. Niemi 39,404; 
Paul's 'True Value Hardware, Inc. 721; Peter Jakstas 
1,000; Pinto-Thomas, M.D., S.C. 1,170; Postmaster 
2,617; Adam C. Skrzenta 463; Lorry L Spencer 22,755; 
Spruce Lake Sand & Gravel, Inc. 641; Catherine 
Starostovic 11,699; TJ Associates 1 ,058; USCM-Midwest 
8,423; Lawrence Verjinski 10,545; Village of Fox Lake 
500; Bernard J. Vltek 19,222; Walter L & Gloria Thome 
1,819; Wisconsin Dept of Revenue 1,098; Less - Payroll 
Taxes and Adjustments included above: 52,175. Total 
Others Less Than $1,000.00: $20,210. 
GENERAL ASSISTANCE FUND 
FUND BALANCE APRIL 1, 1993 
TOTAL REVENUES 
LESS - EXPENDITURES 
FUND BALANCE MARCH 31, 1994 

REVENUES: Property Taxes 74,786; Winchester 
House Reimbursement 19,538; Other Reimbursement 
327; Interest Income 1 ,930. 

EXPENDITURES: American Municipal Software 
3,350; Commonwealth Edison 1,436; Commonwealth 
Edison 2,138; Drake's Office Supply 145; Fox Lake State 
Bank 5,018; June F. Frost 22,408; Gordon D. Kiesgen 
552; Gordon Flesch Company, Inc. 379; Guardian Life 
Insurance Co. 4,436; I.M.R.F. 1,197; JL Dir. of 
Employment Security 214; Illinois Dept. of Revenue 667; 
Lake County Circuit Clerk 9; Lake County Health 
Department 9,435; Logo-A-Gogo 233; Ellen J. Mansfield 
4,193; Molidor Insurance 455; Patrick J. Murrey 2,826; 
Northern Illinois Gas 513; Paul's True Value Hardware, 
Inc. 60; Pik-Kwik Foods 1,691; Postmaster 121; USCM- 
Midwest 4,824; Village of Fox Lake 741; Winchester 
House 19,538; Less - Payroll Taxes and Adjustments 
included above: 16,464. Total Others Less Than 
$1,000.00:9,544. 
ROAD & BRIDGE FUND 

FUND BALANCE APRIL 1, 1993 $42,749 

TOTAL REVENUES 324,509 

LESS - EXPENDITURES 279.445 

FUND BALANCE MARCH 31, 1994 $87.813 

REVENUES: Property Taxes 266,181; Personal 
Property Replacement Tax 17,216; Distribution of Fines 
1,459; Other Reimbursements 14,978; Interest Income 
4,431; Loan Proceeds 20,244. 

EXPENDITURES: A-Tire County Service, Inc. 3,712; 
American Power Rodding Corp. 1 ,000; Bark Associates 
1,949; Richard R. Brown 5,100; Bumham & Flower of 
Illinois 1,193; Cellular One 1,433; Commonwealth Edison 
12,129; Commonwealth Edison 23,776; Computer Bay 
4,117; Cowen, Crowley & Nord, P.C. 264; Drake's Office 
Supply 357; Elgin Sweeper Company 9,438; Fox Lake 
State Bank 3,405; Fox Lake State Bank 54,818; Fox Lake 
Ace Hardware 2,831; GAA Oil Co. 93; Grayslake Feed 
Sales, Inc. 1,139; Guardian Life Insurance Co. 24,762; 
Hoyle Road Equipment Co. 2,882; I.M.R.F. 867; IL Dir of 
Employment Security 1,142; Illinois Dept. of Revenue 
514; Illinois Bell 1,009; Industrial Towel & Uniform, Inc. 
1,817; Jack R. Kiesgen (Reimb) 1,241; Joe Meyer Tree 
Service 4,700; K.K.A.M., Inc. 4,540; Kimber Kiesgen 
14,161; Lake County Treasurer 1,266; Lakeland 
Community Bank 7,217; Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. 
29,563; Long Lake Lumber Company 998; Major Hill 
Insurance Agency 28,203; Molidor Insurance 1,715; 
NAPA Auto Supply - Fox Lake 2,448; Northern Illinois 
Gas 4,610; Northshore Waste Control 1,524; Paul's True 
Value Hardware, Inc. 286; Petersen Sand 4 Gravel, Inc. 
2,093; Postmaster 29; Ray Schramer & Co. 435; Ted 
Smak 1,000; State Bank of the Lakes 21,407; USCM- 
Midwest 1,300; West Side Tractor Sales Co. 2,382; WLI 
Industries 633; Less - Payroll Taxes and. Adjustments 
included above: 9,024. Total ' Others Less Than 
$1,000.00:26,957. 
BUILDING & EQUIPMENT FUND 
FUND BALANCE APRIL 1 , 1993 $0 

TOTAL REVENUES 71,254 

LESS - EXPENDITURES 74.462 

FUND BALANCE MARCH 31, 1994 ($3,208) 

REVENUES: Property Taxes 70,948; Interest Income 
306. ' '. •> 

EXPENDITURES: Alexander Equipment Co., Inc. 
21,917; Bum's Equipment Co. 42,866; Fox Lake State 
Bank 9,679. 
PERMANENT ROAD 

FUND BALANCE APRIL 1 , 1993 $75,989 

REVENUES 341,952 

LESS - EXPENDITURES . 354.137 

FUND BALANCE MARCH 3 1 , 1 994 $63.804 



REVENUES: Property Taxes 335,768; Other 
Reimbursements 512; Interest Income 5,672. 

EXPENDITURES: American Power Rodding Corp. 
390; Richard R. Brown 6,768; Commonwealth Edison 
11,470; Anthony J. Culotta 29,461; Fox Lake State Bank 
32,677; Fox Lake Ace Hardware 94; GAA Oil Co. 12,508; 
Glacier Lake Sand & Gravel 3,021; Guardian Life 
Insurance Co; 260; I.M.R.F. 7,708; Illinois Dept. of 
Revenue 4,686; J. Pease Construction Co., Inc. 1,575; 
Kimber Kiesgen 12,783; Lake County Circuit Clerk 108; 
Long Lake Lumber Company 95; Metal Culverts, Inc. 
1,914; Richard J. Mikal 26,776; Daniel R. Miller 36,763; 
Gregory J. Murrey 29,056; North American Salt Co. 
22,895; Paul's True Value Hardware, Inc. 14; Petersen 
Sand 8. Gravel, Inc. 7,275; Ray Schramer & Co. 950; 
Skokie Valley Asphalt Co., Inc. 1 14,290; James M. Smak 
29,673; Spruce Lake Sand & Gravel, Inc. 2,126; Thelen 
Sand & Gravel, Inc. 2,912; Tonyan Bros., Inc. 1,158; 
USCM - Midwest 3,825; WAV Sales & Leasing Co. 1,484; 
WLI Industries 1,438; Less - Payroll Taxes and 
Adjustments included above 55,867. Total Others Less 
Than $1,000.00: 3,854. 
RETIREMENT FUND 

FUND BALANCE APRIL 1, 1993 $29,21 1 

REVENUES 86,125 

LESS - DISBURSEMENTS - 78.329 

FUND BALANCE MARCH 31 , 1994 $97.007 

REVENUES: Property Taxes 60,356; Pers. Prop. 
Replacement Tax 24,648; Interest Income 1,121. 

EXPENDITURES: Fox Lake State Bank 33,590; 
I.M.R.F. 44,739. 

TREASURER'S OATH 

I, Gordon Kiesgen, being sworn, depose and say that I 
am the Treasurer for the Town of Grant, and that the 
above is a true copy of the Annual Treasurer's Report for 
the fiscal year ending March 31, 1994. 

(<U Gordon Kiesoen. Treasurer 

0994E-195-FL 

September 30, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
COUNTY ZONING NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS ) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) SS #2951 
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given to all persons In the 
town of Grant, Lake County, Illinois, that a public hearing 
will be held on Wednesday, October 26, 1994, at 1:30 
p.m., in the Grant Township Hall, 411 Washington St, 
Ingleslde, IL 60041 , relative to two requests: 1) to rezone 
the property described in Exhibit A from the Countryside/ 
Agricultural (C) District to the Special Use (SU) District; 
and 2) to seek a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) to permit 
a Ready Mix/Concrete Mixing operation on the property 
described In Exhibit B. 
EXHIBIT A 

The North 7.30 chains of the Northeast quarter of the 
Southwest quarter of Section 27 (except the North 92 feet 
of the East 727.60 faet thereof, and part of the Northwest 
quarter of said Section 27, all In Township 45 North, 
Range 9, East of the Third Principal Meridian lying 
Southwesterly of Federal Aid Route 201 (except that part 
described as follows: Commencing at the center of said 
Section; thence West along the center line of said Section 
27 to the Westerly right of way of Federal Aid Route 201 
and the place of beginning; thence continuing West on 
the center of said Section to a point 729.63 feet West of 
said place of beginning; thence North degrees 14 min- 
utes 52 seconds West, 416.39 feet to a point; thence 
North 89 degrees 45 minutes 08 seconds East 60.46 feet 
parallel with the South line of the Southeast quarter of 
said Northwest quarter section to a point on the Westerly 
right of way line of said Federal Aid Route 201 ; thence 
South 61 degrees 12 minutes 32 seconds East 240.75 
feet along said right of way to a point; thence South 75 
degrees 14 minutes 08 seconds East 96.65 feet to the 
point of curvature of a non-tangent curve to the right hav- 
ing a radius of 390.0 feet, thence along said curve 420.88 
feet whose cord bears South 32 degrees 22 minutes 34 
seconds East 400.53 feet to a point; thence South 
degrees 02 minutes 19 seconds East 27.24 feet along a 
non-tangent line to the place of beginning, all in Grant 
Township, Lake County, Illinois. Consisting of approxi- 
mately 71.51 acres. 
EXHIBIT B 

That part of the Northwest quarter of Section 27, 
Township 45 North, Range 9 East of the Third Principal 
Meridian, described as follows: commencing at the 
Southwest corner of said Northwest quarter of Section 
27; thence East along the South line of said Northwest 
quarter of Section 27, 1020 feet; thence North, at right 
angles to the last described course, 425.00 feet; thence 
Northwesterly on a line forming an angle of 27 degrees 
47 minutes 15 seconds to the left of the prolongation of 
the last described line, 600.00 feet; thence Northeasterly 
at right angles to the last described course, 333.50 feet; 
thence Southeasterly, at right angtes to the last described 
course, 600.00 feet; thence Southwesterly, at right angles 
to the last described course, 333.50 feet, to the point of 
beginning In Lake County, Illinois. 

The subject property is located on the west side of 
Route 12, 1.6 miles north of Route 120, Volo, Illinois. 

As a result of the petition of JACK PEASE (owner of 
record), which petition Is on file and available for exami- 
nation in the office of the Lake County Zoning Board of 
Appeals, County Administration Building, 18 N. County 
St., Waukegan, IL 60085. All interested persons are invit- 
ed to attend said hearing and be heard. 

LAKE COUNTY ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
CLAYTON L CHRISTENSEN . Chairman 
For this hearing, reasonable accommodation will be 
made for handicapped persons. This Includes accommo- 
dation for the vision and hearing impaired if a request Is 
made within 48 hours of the meeting time. 

Dated at Waukegan, Illinois, this 16th day of 
September 1994. 

Legals 0994E-194-FL 

#2951 September 30, 1994 



Esther Mae Radke 

Age 102 of Lake Forest, 
IL, formerly of Grayslake, 
IL died Saturday, 
September 24, 1994 in 
Lake Bluff, IL. She was 
born In Fremont Twp. on 
October 26, 1891. She was 
a lifelong member of the 
Ivanhoe Congregational 
Church in Ivanhoe, IL. 

She leaves a daughter 
Helen (Harold) Cowley, 
Lake Forest, 1U two grand- 
sons Douglas (Nancy) 
Cowley, Clearwater, FL and 
James (Rosemary) Cowley, 
SL Louis,' MO; two great- 
grandsons Kevin & Michael 
Cowley, Clearwater, FL 
She was preceded In death 
by her husband Rabcr D. 
Radke and one daughter 
Dorothc J. Collins. 

Graveside services will 
be held Saturday, October 
1, 1994 at 1:00 p.m. at the 
Ivanhoe Cemetery with 
the Rev. Wayne Novak 
officiating. In lieu of flow- 
ers, contributions may be 
made to the Ivanhoe 
Congregational Church, 
21078. W. Hwy. 176, 
Mundelein, IL 60060. 
Arrangements are handled 
by Strang Funeral Chapel, 
Ltd., 410 E. Belvidere Rd., 
Grayslake, IL 60030. 



ABRAI1AMSON 

Brian A. Abrahamson, 22, 
of Lake Villa, IL. Arr: 
Rlnga Funeral Home, 
Lake Villa, IL 
BRICHTA 

Charles A. Brichta, 81, of 
Lindenhurst, IL Arr: 
Ringa Funeral Home, 
Lake Villa, IL 
BURNS 

Margaret G. "Midge- 
Bums (nee Galvin), 79, of 
Lake Zurich, IL. Arr: 
Ahlgrim & Sons Funeral 
Home, Lake Zurich, IL 

FULLER 

Morris "Willie" Fuller, age 
80, of Gurnee, IL. Arr: 
Gurnee Funeral Home, 
Gurnee, IL. 
GRICUS 

Mary Gricus, 81, of Lake 
Villa, IL Arn Rlnga Funeral 
Home, Lake Villa, IL 



Edward J. J en dr as 

Age 74 of Mesa, Arizona, Jate oWAntloch and 
Chicago, IL, passed awayon September 15, 1994 at Mesa 
General Hospital. Mr. Jendras was a veteran of World 
War II and the Korean conflict. He was a member of 
AntlochV.F.W. Post 4551. . 

Survivors Include two sisters Eleanore Potcmpa of 
Mesa, AZ and Mildred (Mickey) of Chicago, IL; two 
brothers Stan of Lake Shangri-La En Bristol, WI and John 
of Chicago, IL. 

Funeral services were held in Chicago, II with full 
military honors, courtesy of Rhine Post 2729 of Chicago, 
IL 

Rene J. Ruts 

Age 92 of Antloch,. IL. passed away Friday, 
September 23, 1994" at Lutheran General Hospital In 
Park Ridge, IL He was born February 19, 1902 In St 
Gilles, Belgium. Mr. Ruts came to the U.S. In 1910, living 
In Ironwood, MI and later Chicago, IL before moving to 
Antloch In 1972. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and a 
member of the Ardennes American Legion Post #895 of 
Chicago, IL He had attended St. Peters Church In 
Antloch and was also a member of the Belgium 
Americans Club and the Janitors Union Local #1 of 
Chicago, IL On May 18, 1935 he married Josephine 
Linssens in Chicago, IL and she preceded him In death 
on May 20, 1984. 

Survivors include one daughter Dorothy (Ronald) 
Bezdon of Morton Grove, IL and three grandchildren 
Ronald (Joan) Bezdon of Antioch, IL Joanne (Frank) 
Moy of Mt. Prospect, IL and Thomas (Jennifer) Bezdon 
of Des Plaines, IL He was the great-grandfather of 
Michael and Lauren. Besides his wife, he was also pre- 
ceded in death by two sisters and four brothers. 

Private funeral services with Mass of Christian 
Burial were held Tuesday, September 27, 1994 at St. 
Peter Church, Antioch, IL. Interment was in Mt. Carmel 
Cemetery, Antioch, IL Strang Funeral Home, Antioch, 
IL handled the arrangements. 



xsutasuzs cfunetciCwntzAel, Jz/b£. 




Fourth Generation Family offering 
sincerity sensitivity At com/ort In your 
time of need. 

We work with your best interest in 
mind to help ease your burden. 

We encourage you to learn, more i about 
your options. It's never too early. 
Inquiries are always welcome. 



•Pre arrang entente 
•Veteran* * Social 
Security Benefit* 
•Air Shipping Service 
•Tax Free Trust 



•Medical Science 
•Public Aid 
•Direct Cremation 
•Pore Thought 
Inaurance Plan 
•Payment Plan* 



Tersottal caring for over 90 years 

410 East Belvidere Rd. Grayslake 

223-8122 




Mommy, 

every time I think about 
Dad f s death I want to cry. 

You won't leave me, too, 
will you? 

The death of a parent can be very upsetting to a child. 
Besides feeling sad and lonely, many children feel very 
insecure. The safe environment that the family unit pro- 
vides has been destroyed and often children don't know 
what to expect next. Children need a lot of reasurrance and 
love when a parent dies. They should be allowed to cry 
and to express their feelings. Children should be allowed 
to share in ceremonies for deceased parents,, if they wish. 
While the gap created by death won't ever completely 
close, love and understanding will help bring a family 
closer together. 



t/Stt'Jt** 




/ .Wfvne. Mai. 



anl(>v; 



12 N. Plstakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, Illinois 
Phone: (708)587-2100 • (815)385-1001 



* 



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ffii i i i »Mm<hii > (l d m ^ mt f y i '^ tP-t Wi»in; A a^S -iysff-.. 



StprcMbci 10, 1994 UkElAwd Newspapers CLASSIFIED. 



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Penonals „., , .„.,..,.„ , ;, „ 125 

AUOJ0D5.., , ...,...,,,.,,,,,„, uiminmiii, ..,.,.,...,.,,130 

Business rorsomu ,,..,. ....■„;.„„.„„„„„„„„„.„„ „„,.,„„„„ M „, 135 

riilAl] Oil,,...,,,,,, .,,,...,.,,,,,,...,, ,„«,.„«.,»„„„ „„, <„♦,,,,,.„ 140 




McJp Wan tod Part-Time „.,.219 

Iidp Wanted Full-Tlme :.„„ .„„.„..,.. ;,220 

EfflpIoymentAgeodes.,...,.„ „.....,: 221 

Business Opportunities „ „ ;. „ 225 

StuauJons Waxed,...:. „ ...,.„.«„ „„ ««H228 

Child Care., « „.,.; ; „...„.240 

Scbool/Instrucuon ........».»,....,.....„..',... •„„„ ,.,250 




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d incT/ 1 r*3^. ihi«i MiimHiHHi ...I »3v8 

Bazaan/Crafts,.„ ..„....„ 310 

Building MUeriib.„. „„.„ „.3i4 

BuslnessA)fflce Equipment . i( ; 318 

EkctronlcsAkxnputm „....„„...„,.,„, .,....,„,.„.„ 320 

rum uuiciv 1 < .,,, , itiimtt niTiMiiti'iuioI •.*.> j£4 

Firewood. ...„ ,„,. „. M ,,...328 

Cirate/BianmjRe Sales ....... ......330 

GoodlhinptoEal ..,„ 334 

Horses aT»ck .;... .....".J, 338 

Household C^»4/Purnlture. ..../..-MO 

Jewelry- „........„-.i...^.„.„..„. ............ „.344 

LSWufUXIUQl 1 en .1...,.., , „ „,.,,HMii.jio 

Miscellaneous , ...350 

Medical Equln/SuppUe.... „,.. ;„... „ ....354 

Musical Instruments ~ '..*.„.., „.„„.,.„....„..„ ..,.358 

Pets* Supplies 360 

Restaurant Equipment ; „ ............ 364 

Toots & Machinery. „ /......................36a* 

Wanted To Buy, „ 370 



Rem Estate 



Homes For Sale., ,.„ „. ,-..„ 500 

Homes For Rent.., 



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.504 

Homes Wanted.....;.,. v „......„...„.„..„ .„ 508 

nomes t>uinjers .,..,,.,, «.,., ,,. ..,.„,,.,,,,,.,,,,., .,.,510 

u)noo/TOWU HOfnes .,.....»..•«,,,. ,.„.,.... „„„,„,„,., 514 

mUUIlt. ltvJOC3 , > ...,..,.,,.,. , ^lO 

1 Apartments For Rent, 520 

Apartments Wanted '. ..,..„,....,... .....524 

Apl/Homes To Share 52B 

Rooms For Rent ™ ...530 

j Biddings :...;,..;;.;■...„.,:....,..„...;..„.„.; ....... 533 

Business Property For Sale — ;,..._...„.;.:„.. ■;..;.... 534 

Business Property For Rent _... 538 

tflVGSfOMBI Property.,. .......... ..»,. **••*■..■«.,-.■*»**.■ .,.,.,....„ j*t\) 

Mortgage Services - - ...» 544 

Farms •„ '. - ; 54B 

vacxut Lots/ Acreage. ........ ....,,. .*,.». .*,,,.. >. jov 

Resorts/VacaU on Rentals........ ..„.,.«...,.„.., ;.. .,...564 

Out of Area Property....- » 568 

Cemetery Lots. „ „ 570 

Real Estate Wanted. 574 

Real Estates Misc. „_....-„...„......, ..578 




Recreattonal Vehicles... -.. 704 

Snowmobile/ATV's - 708 

Boats/Motors/Etc „ 710 

Camping ,„.„„....„....„.„,„'.!...,....,....-...„.......„........ ..714 

Tnvd/Vacailoa ;...; ...;....718 

Sports Equipment - .........720 

Airplanes 724 




Rental/Leases 

Classic/Antique Cars 810 

Service & Parts ~. ».. - 814 

Car Loans/Insurance .......818 

Vans — «... 824 

Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps « ..-...-. 828 

Tiucks/rrallers ,. — — -834 

Heavy Equipment.,..,--,,,,- ,......^.. .................ojo 

Motorcycles ».«- ...»...;. ........844 

Wxnwu To twy ,,,,,,. • - ►....^ - .0*10 

•,■.*■■■ i^% .■■■■* ■■■.■■■■■■■■■ ¥■:■ ■'.■',<■>'.■'.■'.•'. w!Tk ■.■■■■.■.■•,■.' 

ApwotncGS Kopilr *•••* ■' «»" ...*»... wj 

Blacktop.. ...» — — • 306 

Bulkkrs .'. 909 

Carpentry „„„.,...... S12 

Carpet Cleaning ...„..,„,. -S15 

Concrete/CenxnL » S18 

DryWaU ....»..; S21 

E(rucaiJoQ/InstrucUon »« S24 

Electrical - ■■ S27 

Hrewood - S30 

Handymao -•• s 33 

Healins/AlrCondltkmlng ■S3" 

Housekeeping ■ » gj 

Landscaping - • •• ™ 

Laundry/deanmg,... „.»..«.«..........« ■• •> » .....S45 

Legal Services «... S4 8 

MedteaJ Services - » ■•'■ S51 

Movtnt/Storage « S54 

PatatogOteconting ,» SJ7 

hu^Leganyptog Services .» SW 

Phunbtag - • --'pW 

Pools »6 

Pressure Washing » — *9 

professional Services » — S72 

Radiom Repair. J75 

Remodeling « - ^8 

Resumes ;•»! 

Roofing/Siding 



Storage.. 



S87 



Tai Service. : -W 

Trees/Hints ! ; ^3 

Weddtog. " ™ 

Miscellaneous Services ■- • --^9 



Twin 



Richmond 



ft" 1 .*.! , 



Cfy'llil'- 



Mcllcnry 
County 



diSTRibuTJON 



KcnoNho 
€ounly 

■Silver Liki 






<'■:■> 






If, :,«2lon 
E^.Miaworih 




•Kcnoshj' 






fiiielWBfcWHfc 



■ : y Hlrjhland Park \^ 



Aim' ' ■"' 
"^rT: ' r. . -DecHield 



•Pilitlnt' 



MM ■ 



Guttata Grove 




Metra 
:Milwaukee 

RR 



•Northbrook 



t'ouU County 



Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in 13 Newspapers! 

Anlioch News-Reporter • Round Lake News ♦ Lake Zurich Enterprise ♦ 

Lake Villa Record • Mundeleln News • Warren-Newport Press • 

Grayslake Times • Fox Lake Press • Gurnee Press • Lindenhurst News • 

JVernon Hills News • Wauconda leader • Llbertyville^News 



HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD 



a 




BY 
PHONE 

BY 
MAIL 



Call (708) 223-8161 



Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 260 
Grayslake, I L 60030 



IN 30 S. Whitney St., 

PERSON... Grayslake 

«-»J BY FAX ... (708) 223-8810 

DEADLINES 

Direct Line, Tues. 5 pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party ..Wed. 10 am 

HOURS 

8 am 7 8 pm Mon.-Jhurs 

8 am - 6 pm ....Friday 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 




110 


1 Notices 



115 



Lost & Found 



110 


Notices 



110 


( Notices 



110 


Notices 



HEY GALACAWEICZ 

IS IT YOUR BIRTHDAY? 

WHY YES IT IS! 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, DAD 
Love, 

John 




S. ilicon 

I. nformation 

Support 

T. hrough 

E. duration 

R.esources & 

S. ervices • 

Sisters Support Group Meeting 

November 2, 1994 at 

John Hersey High School 

1900 E. Thomas, Arlington Heights 

7-9 p.m. In the school cafeteria 

Please come and join us Tor an evening of learning about the 

affects of silicone in the body, and to have any of your questions 

answered. We will have a format which includes a lime for sharing 

information with each other. This will be YOUR support group, 

and you will have input into the group dynamics. 

Attend the first meeting and assist the co-founders in establishing 
the group from Its foundation and watch it growl 

We hope to sec you on November 2, 1994, and every first 
Wednesday of the month thereafter. If you have any questions 
please call one of the co-founders. 

Laura ... 708-272-0667 
Steph ... 708-837-6255 
Peggy ... 708-832-0527 




REWARD! $1,000 for video 
footage or $500 (or variable Irv 
formation regarding steer 
killed at sherrlff rodeo on Sat- 
urday, September 17, 1994. 
Anonymity guaranteed. (706) 
552-7872 or (708) 550-6925. 



Happy Birthday To The Best 

Fisherman In Lake County!? 
Love/ 

Darce 



of 





FOUND MALE CAT, 

black/whlilo/orange, 4- 

7/months, Round Lake Beach 
area, Edwards Subdivision. 
9/18. (708) 740-0654 after 
6pm. ' 

FOUND SEPTEMBER 14 

IN LAKE VILLA AREA MALE 
CHIHUAHUA. CALL (708) 356- 
5954. 

GENEROUS REWARD tor 
live return of my green Para- 
keet. Escaped 9/1 B, Fox Lake 
area. (708) 973-0412. 



120 



Free 



gJTie Jamify of {John <W. ^oran 

would like to thank you for your kind 

expressions of sympathy cards, flowers, 

memorials and support. We will long 

remember the love expressed. 



See you on November 2nd,,, Be there! 



s 

$ 



( 



(' 



>s 



* Happy 
Birthday 

ELAINE 

3 (my much 
e ) older sister!) 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more Information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. 'Jl 

FREE COLOR CATALOG 
tor personalized children's 
story books and baby books. 
Each book has name, age, 
town and friends, making your 
child the star. Receive In one 
week. McCarthy's Create-a- 
Book, PO Box 1085, Linden- 
hurst, III., 60046. (708) 
356-0031, 

MOVING SALE OVER- 
COME AND GET IT!! 
FREE KNICK-KNACKS, 

DRUM, TABLE, KITCHEN 
ITEMS, LOTS . MORE. 
3S05 EVA AVE. PARK 
CfTY. 



125 


1 Personals 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

Please check your ad on the FIRST Insertion date. In the 
event of an error or omission, we will be responsible for 
ONLY the FIRST Incorrect insertion. Tho newspaper will be 
responsible for only the portion of the ad that is In error. 
Please notify the Classified Department In the event of an 
error within 1 week of run date. CANCELLATIONS must be 
made prior to 5 p.m. on the Tuesday before publication. 

Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to properly clas- 
sify all advertising, edit or delete any objectionable wording, 
or reject any advertisement for credit or policy reasons. 

All Help Wanted advertising Is published under unified 
headings. Lakeland Newspapers does not knowingly accept 
help wanted advertising that In any way violates the Human 
Rights Act. 

Payment in Advance is Required for These Ads: 

•Advertisers out of Lakeland circulation area 

•Business Opportunities 'Mobile Homes •Situations Wanted 

•Debt Disclaimers 'Garage and Moving Sales 

'Found and Giveaway Ads are FREE, 

No pefs wiil be considered for giveaway. 

WE ACCEPT: QB®$|ii 



COMPUTER SHOW AND 
SALE. October 9th., 10am- 
3pm. Holiday Inn, 6161 W. 
Grand Ave. Gumee. Save up 
to 60% on new/used hard- 
ware, software, books, CD's, 
parts, supplies, accessories 
and share waro. For mors ln- 
formatlon call (219) 931-3761 

PARENTS- TOl/GHLOVE a 
support group for parents of 
troubled children/teens, 
meets each week, at Round 
Lake Area Park Dlst. room 
114. Located on Hart Rd. 
and Rio. 134, Round Lake. 
GET THE SUPPORT 
YOU'VE BEEN LOOKING 
FORI Or call (800)92fr-KiDS, 
For Information. 

PUT YOUR CHILD'S 
NAME, AGE, TOWN AND 
FRIEND IN THEIR OWN 
STORY BOOK. Free, color 
catalog. Babybooks, birth- 
days, Christmas, Hanukkah, 
navy, school, dinosaur, sports, 
etc. $14.95 plus $2 S/H. One 
week dolrvery. 

McCarthy'3 Create-a-Book, 
Box ■ 1085, Lindenhurst, III. 
80046. (708) 356-0031. 



EARN '$50. In FREE Mer- 
chandise or MORE, Just being 
a 'Christmas Around The 
World' hostess. Call Artene tor 
Information on specialty gifts 
or Christmas AND catalogs 
today at (708) 740-1384. 

WANTED 13-MORE PEO- 
PLE TO LOSE UP TO 
30LBS IN 30-DAY PRO- 
GRAM, FOR UNDER 
$100. 100% GUAR- 
ANTEED. OFFER WILL 
END SOONl CALL NOW1 
(708) 360-0690. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may 
receive a misleading state- 
ment from anollicr firm re- 
questing payment for lilts 
advertising. To receive prop- 
er credit to your account, 
ah payments for your Lake- 
land Newspapers advertising 
must be mode as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Ncwapapcn 

po bo i aea 

so a. Whitney at. 

Orayalake, 1L 60030-0208 



ADOPTION- A LOVING 
ALTERNATIVE. Dr. Dad and 
creative, at home Mom thank 
you for considering the gltl of 
lite. We understand this Is a 
tough time but your concern 
fills our hearts with love and 
hope. Our loving, secure 
home Is Just waiting tor the 
laughter of children. Medical, 
legal, counseling, and court 
approved living expenses 
paid, Information confidential. 
Please call our attorney at 
(708)957-6446. 

ADOPTION-TRUST US 

WITH YOUR GREATEST 
GIFT. Let us help you to give 
your precious baby everything 
you could wish for. If lor any 
reason you are unable to raise 
you baby yourself- please 
trust us to fulfill your hopes 
and dreams. Your trust and 
wishes will be honored. The 
baby will have a lifetime of love 
and happiness with a lull time 
Mom and adoring Dad. We live 
In a beautiful suburban home 
and will provide an excellent 
education and financial securi- 
ty. Confidential, medical, legal, 
counseling and court ap- 
proved living expenses paid. 
Please let us help by calling 
our attorney at (708)957- 
6343. 




CLASSIFIED LaMancI Newspapers ScpTCMbctt 70, 1994 












J 






! i « 



1 

W 

I I 
I I 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




125 


Personals 



125 


Personals 



A BABY, A DREAM COME 
TRUE: ADOPTION! Lot us 
glvo your baby Iho simple Joys 
ol family, all the love In our 
hearts, and a happy socuro fu- 
ture! Wo are a down-to-earth 
professional couplo longing to 
share our life with children. 
Can we welcome your baby? 
CALL LAURA & MARC 
(708) 662-0261 COL- 
LECT! 

ADOPTION- PLEASE 
HELP. Loving professional 
couplo happily married lor 14 
years desperately wants to 
complete our family. Our only 
chance is you. We can fulfill all 
the dreams you have for your 
precious baby. The baby will 
have a. lifetime of love and 
happiness and a devoted lull 
time Mom and an adoring 
Dad. Wo live In a beautiful sub- 
urban home with lots of kids 
and park nearby. We will pro- 
vide an excellent education 
and financial security. Confi- 
dential, medical, counseling, 
and court approved living ex- 
penses paid. Please help by 
calling our attorney at 
(7081957-6843. 

ADOPTION: Sue and Adrian 
offer your baby security, 
laughter and most of all, love 
and happiness. Allowable ex- 
penses paid. Please call our 
attorney collect (312) 782- 
2548 or 1-800-24ADOPT (24 
Hours). 



FINANCIALLY SECURE 
COUPLE wants to adopt 
nowborn. Call Debbie and 
SIOVQ collect (70a)295-9515. 

IF YOU LOVE TO COOK, 
hate to cook, or |usl need new 
ideas, share a PAMPERED 
CHEF KITCHEN SHOW with 
your friends! It's funl Call for 
details (312)781-0148, 

LOOKING FOR AVON 
PRODUCTS, BUT DONT 
KNOW WHERE TO BUY 
THEM? CALL LORI-AVON 
INDEPENDENT SALES 

REP. (70B) 546-031 S. 

WE CAN PROVIDE A 
CHILDHOOD filled With 
warmth, security, values, and 
unconditional love from Mom 
and Dad; a spacious home In 
a wooded setting complete 
with a friendly golden retriev- 
er; and loving Grandparents 
nearby waiting to give pony 
rides. If this life Is what you 
would want for your baby, 
please call us at 1-000-819- 
7352 or our attorney Glenna 
at 1-800-241-5384. Jack and 
Andrea. 



135 



Business Personals 



1995 LUXURY VEHICLE. 

$800/down, $75/month. Free 
information LSASE to: Sutton, 
7506 W. 161st., Tlnley Park, III. 
60477. 




219 



Help Wanted 

Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



HAVE FUN DEMON- 
STRATING Christmas ar- 
ound the world, House of 
Lloyd, Work P/T, earn F/T pay. 
Free kit and training. No In- 
vestment. For more Informa- 
tion call Sheryl (708) 
587-6042. 

LOSERS WANTED! 5 to 
500 bs. Fast, Quick and Easy! 
Guaranteed. (708)54S-SLIM. 

SERVICEMASTER. We're 
looking for PfT office cleaners, 
evenings, (ngleslde and Crys- 
tal Lake. $5.40hr. (815) 455- 
JOHN. 

WANTED 77 MORE PEO- 
PLE to Lose up to 30 pounds. 
Programs start under $100. If 
you donl need to lose 
weight, someone you love 
I. (708)223-2517. 



CLERK 

For a comic shop in 

train station. Hours 

3:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. 

Call (708) 872-3313 




HOME TYPISTS 

PC users needed 
$35,000 potential 
Details. Call (1) 805 
962-8000 Ext B-4458 



"* Cafeteria *"" 

Energetic, responsible, 
flexible individuals 
needed to fill positions 
of food preparation, 
serving, and cashiering 
at Ivy Hall Middle 
School with varied 
hours: 10:30am 
2:30pm. Applications 
available at Twin Groves 
Jr. High Food Service, 
2600 N. Buffalo Grove 
Rd. from 7am - 9am/ 
2:30pm - 4:00pm or call 
(708)821-8946: 

EOEM/F/V/H 



Tolemarkellivg 

We're Talking 
Opportunity! 

Earn $8-S8.S0/hr. 

+ Bonuses! 
Salem Service! has immediate 
opening! for 15 stable and 
dependable Individuals to work 
in our client's elegant Lalco 
Forest offices selling educa 
tlonal materials to business 
professionals. Bonuses are 
based on your performance and 
can range from Sl-2.SQ/hr. 
Training Is provided. This is a 
long term assignment with per- 
manent opportunities, based on 
performance. Your own trans, is 
necessary. 8am-3pm standard 
shift/hours are flexible, work 
more or fewer hours. For moon 
lighters, evening hours are also 
available. Call fodayl 

708-676-3060 
I Salem Services 



/or Lunch hour and 
Wednesday night 

CALL MARY 
(708) 689-3228 



MDMA ENTRY i 

=Lo"<e Bluff manufacturings 
=Co. seeking team players 
5 with excel lent typing skills s 
Sro perform Data EntryS 
Sand general office duties = 
Sfbr 2 to 3 flexible hours S 
= per day. $600 per hour. ^ 

I Pfeise ait VI or Gta. I 
| at (709) 473-1300 | 

nllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllirrs 



K BANQUET x 
SERVERS 

Good hourly rate 
Varied hours available 
Experience preferred . 
'Also Disbwasben/Bwboys 

The Country Squire 

Banquet Facility 

Rfcs. 120 & 45, Grayslake, IX 

k (708)223-3022 - 



DELIVERY 
WORK 

Needed for Mondays 
and/or Tuesdays. 

Car and dependability 

a must. For more 

Information call 

(708) 223-8161 

Ask for Bob Schroeoer 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Customer Service 

510/Hour 
Part Time - Evenings 

Excellent opportunity in 
the Gurnee area for an 
experienced customer 
service person with great 
communication & math 
skills, ' professional 
appearance. Will greet 
and help customers to use 
new cash system. Long 
term 6 months, starting 
immediately. Call now 
for interview, 

Norrell Services 

708-318-0993 



LOOKING FOR A I 

GREAT PUCE 

TO MAKES 

National Medical Record 

photocopy service has 

part time copy rep 

position available in' 

'Hoffman Estates medical I 

► facility. Duties will include ' 

[logging, copying, Invoicing j 

and mailing confidential 

medical records. Must be 

professional and service 

1 oriented. Previous medical J 

clinic experience a plus. 

Daytime hours. Please 

send/fax resume to: 

Smart Corporation 

131 West Layton Avmu*,' 

Suit* 208 

MfwaukM, Wl 53207 

Fax*: (414)483-2248 



Earn Up To 

$15 per hour 

CUSTOMER 
SERVICE 

Complete training, 

paid holidays, 

flexible part- time 

hours. 

Call 
Bob or Aim 

(708)223-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspaper* > 



rMMfll) UOVEh 

ANIMALS? 

Do you have 2 hours per week to spare? Assisi 
Animal Foundation, the area's only no-kill shelters is 
seeking volunteers for work that Is highly rewarding 
and funl We need men and women who: 

'Can work with cats and dogs 

*Do light repair work 

'Answer phones and other office duties 

We are located in Crystal Lake 
For more information calf 

(815) 459-0990 



□ 




219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



^ j ssss *» *t ****** ^^wj 

; organist: 

2 Church Organist for** 
£one Worship Service^ 
••and Choir rehearsal vj 
^»per week plus holy^ 
Relays. $110 per week. ^ 
^Mundelein. «£ 

$(708) 566-0542 S 
*» «* •*•*** •***■*** ** ** •** ** ** 



DISHWASHER/ 
PORTER 

Evenings & Weekends 

Apply in person 

2pm - 5pm Daily 

Partway Restaurant 

3035 Belvidere SL 
Waukegan 



GRAYSLAKE 




♦CASHIERS* 

Part Time Hours Available 

Afternoons, Nights 

& Weekends 

Stop in for Application 

83 & CENTER 

GRAYSLAKE 



residential! 
cleaning 

Part Time/Full Time 

Top Pay! 

$7.25-9,25 per hr. 

Dependability a must. 
Nice daytime hours. No 
weekends. Must have reli- 
able insured transporta- 
tion. Wauconda, Island 
Like, Barring! on area. 

Call Greg between 
7-9 p.m. weekdays 

(708) 487-2557 



Part Time 

TELLER 

We are seeking an Individual to , 
i work as a universal toller, part | 
I time, at our facility In Antloch. 

Hours available would bo 25 ' 

hours per week Including 
I Saturdays. Responsibilities 
I Include servicing customers | 

with their dally transactions, 
i accepting loan payments, 

chock cashing, checking &| 
| savings deposits & variety ol 1 

other duties. Tellers work as a 
i team to service customers In | 

our lobby and drive-up areas. 
I Cash handling experience, l 

customer contact skills and a 
i knowledge of computers would I 

be a plus, but not required. We I 
' are willing to train good appll- 1 

cants. Benefits Include vaca- 
1 tion days, a clothing program, [ 

profit sharing and 4Q1K sav-l 
i Ings. If you are interested In 

applying for this rewarding 

position, stop by the First! 
| National Bank ol Anarch and | 

complete an application, 

FIRST NATIONAL 
BANK OF ANTiOCH 

485 Lake St. 
Antloch, IL 60002 

Equal Opportunity Employer 



Super 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



TTiHMiiHMiiuiMiMmn mimHiinmi 

Clerk Typist 

CenCom E9-1-1 

Emergency Telephone System 

Skilled Word Perfect, light fil- 
inj>, 20 hours n week, MM lo 
be flexible. S7.S7.50 hour 
depending on quail flciitlons. 
Applications ate available at 

911 Lotus Dr. 

Round Lake Beach, IL 

(708) 270-9111 

EOE 



? iinininiiiiiiiiimni'i'i"""" 1 """"- 



SP 



fc 



• HOUSEKEEPERS • 

part time 

Must be able lo 

work weekends 

and holidays. 

COMPANY 

BENEFITS APPLY 

Apply in Person 

Best Western 
Regency Inn 

350 Route 173 

Antiocli 



$ 



j2 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

Lake County's fastest grow 
Ing group ol weakly newspa- 
pers, Is seeking a 

TELEMARKETING 

SUPERVISOR 

The candidate will be responsl 
ble for a stall ol 8-10 part time 
telemarketers. Responsibilities 
Include hiring, training, meet 
Ing departmental quotas. 
Hours are M-Th 3-8:30 with 
possible Fridays or Saturdays. 
It you are professional, enor 
gelic, creative and enjoy vari- 
ety, we are Interested In talking 
to you. 
Please send resume or call. 

LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

30 S. Whitney St., Gray slake 
(708) 223-8161 



DO YOU ENJOY] 
WORKING WITH 
ANIMALS? 

We ara seeking a 

permanent qualified 

person for five hours 

dally Mort-Fri. Must 

love animals, animal 

experience helpful. 

Cleaning, some 

phone work and 

routine medication 

with dogs and cats 

In a cheerful, no kill 

facility Call 

815-459-0990 

9 am - 5 pm 



Check this 

Section Each. 

Week!! 



(OPEN 24 HOURS) 

ONE STORE ONE STOP 

ONE GREAT IDEA 

We are looking for applicants for positions In the following areas: 

Part Time 
♦UTILITY CLERKS 
'GROCERY STOCK 
•CUSTOMER OREETERS 
♦FASHIONS 
*DELI SERVICE 
•AUTO SERVICE WRITER 
•CHECK-OUT SERVICE FTorPT 
*FOOD COURT FTorPT 

Experienced 

*CAKE DECORATOR FTorPT 

'SEAFOOD 

We encourage Applications From M Intimated Senior 
Citizens A Students Wanting Full or Part-Time Employment 

EXCELLENT STARTING WAGES AND BENEFITS 

APPLICATIONS WILL H TAKEN AT: 

413 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Vernon Hills, IL 00041 

Apply at the Layaway Department 

Men.-SaL 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Iln the Interest of safety and to promote a safe production work 

[environment K-Mart stores conducts a pre-employment drug test 

{An Equal Opportunity Employer. 



219 



Help Wanted 

Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




LUNCH & DINNER 
WAIT STAFF 

Fine dining experience 

preferred. Musi be ■ 

pleasant and dependable. 

Apply in Person 

Tues.-Sun. after 1030 a.m. 

* * * * * 

Country Squire 
Restaurant 

RLs. 120 & 45 
Grayslake 

(708) 223-0121 




W 



BHaHBBHBHBHHHHBB 

PHOTO S 
§ STRINGERS jj 

e Lakeland Newspapers rj 
J> has openings an its|J 
■j expanding editorial f, 
e staff for photon 
C stringers. Will handle a a 
E variety of assignments. |j 
eMus? have a reliable rj 
Dear, camera equipments 
Sand be able to work [J 
D under deadline situa-rj 
Etions. For Interview!! 
g appointment contact [j 

d Todd Heisler a 

d Photographer tj 

8(708)223-8161 8 

HBH g BaBB ggg HBBH y| 



Hotel 

Night Auditor- 
Part-Time 

Immediate opening Friday 
& Saturday nights at 
Executive Conference H 
Center. Compel! live start- 
ing wage. Apply in person: M 

HARRISON 
CONFERENCE 

CENTER 

136 Green Bay Road 

Lake Bluff, Illinois 

Please telephone 

708-295-1 100, 

extension 272 If you 

Jj have any questions about 

this opportunity. 





Part Time 
>L\IIUOOM 

Mondays and Tuesdays 
fh our Grayslake office. 
Perfect for retirees, mar- 
ried couples or someone 
wanting to pick up a little 
extra money. 

Call Bob Schroeder 
(708)223-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



m 



Periodontist In Libertyvtlle 

needs 



* 



Approximately 25 hours per week 
<708> 816-7109 



ml 



PART-TIME 

i/AKJubKb 

If you are at least 26 and have 
not reached your 37th birthday you 

could qualify for a career in the ,.- 
NAVAL RESERVE. Benefits Include: . 

•Pension Opportunities 
•Discount Shopping Privleges 
•Paid Training 
'Educational Benefits 
•free Uniforms 
•One Weekend a Month 

•Two Weeks per Year 

•i 



This is an excellent opportunity for you 
to put your civilian experience to work. 

r^: For more Information: 

Rich Hoffman 

mvamTesepTve 708-688-3773 




220 



Help Wanted 
Pull-Tlrac 



ATTENTION DRIVER 

TEAMS. $16,000 In bonus 
paid monthly, quarterly and 
yeariy. Plus top mileage pay, 
401k plan. $600 slgrvon bo- 
nus. Other paid benefits. Vaca- 
tion, health and (He. Dead 
Head, Motel/Layover. Loading 
and Unloading. Covenant 
Transport 1-800-441-4394. 
Solos and students welcome. 

DRIVER - GET MORE 
FOR YOUR MILES I 
OTR/shorthaul opportunities, 
home weekly (uhorthaul), as- 
signed trucks, greaf benefits. 
$750 experienced sign-on bo- 
nus. BURLINGTON MOTOR 
CARRIERS: 1-800-JOtN-BMC. 
E.O.E. 

DRIVERS & OWNER OP- 
ERATORS. . Fox Midwest 
Transport Is expanding list 
tleet. Immediate openings lor 
driving professionals. *No East 
Coast. 'Home Weekly. 'Quar- 
terly Bonuses. 1-800-333- 
2268. 



220 


HeipWAQfrd 
FullrTlme 



OWNER OPERATORS. 

Run refrigerated mid- 
west/southeast. Percentage 
payscale. Home regularly. 
Paid permXs/Hablltty. Revenue 
bonus. No up front cost. Late 
model tractor. Call Gary at 
Land-Span. Lakeland, Fl. 1- 
800-237-8081. 



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Job hunting: Turning failure into successful employment 



For millions of Americans, the task of 
conducting a Job search produces little 
more than frustration, anger, humilia- 
tion, rejection, arid personal defeat. In 
working with'thousands of Job seekers, 
most -Individuals, will place job hunting 
close to the top of their list of things they 
fear most In life. Just after death, serious 
Illness or Injury, financial ruin, and 
divorce,- Jt Is not surprising then to find 
that th&jsulclde rate r among the unem- 
ployed's ^higher; than 'among the 
employed groupr - ' 

There Is no question that the process 
of finding employment, for many peo- 
ple. Is a difficult task Incumbent with a 
high rate of personal pain and failure. 
Knowlng^thls, countless numbers of 
employment . placement agencies 
have sprung up across the nation to 
supposedly relieve people of this bur- 
den. 

Are you then doomed to face this 
terrible situation alone? Is the task of 
hunting for employment one which you 
should simply understand and accept Is 
filled with pain, and suffering? Is Job 
hunting one of life's bitter moments? ' 

No, not if approached Intelligently 
from, an Informed perspective. 
Specifically, not If you acquire and use 
effective job seeking strategies and 
skills,. t VV .. _, .'. , 

The process is akin to watching two 



Individuals who each speak a different 
language trying to talk to each other. 
Their Intentions may be good, but 
because of their Inability to understand 
each other, the outcome is predlcable. 
Many people simply do not understand 
the needs of employers and therefore, 
fall to communicate the very Informa- 
tion which employers require when 
selecting employees. 

The process of seeking employment- 
Is a task, a task which can be' learned - 
and mastered Just like any other task In 
life. Unfortunately, few people take the 
time to leam how to successfully seek 
employment. 

The bottom line then Is simple— If you 
are willing to learn several effective Job 
seeking strategies and skills-, you can 
decrease your pain and failure and 
Increase your success. 

It Is surprising how many people use 
the same old fallure-rldden strategy for 
seeking employment. Once the deci- 
sion has been made that a Job Is need- 
ed, most people will prepare a resume 
and cover letter (which Is their way of 
announcing to the world that they are 
available) and then start looking for 
any Individual or company where they 
can forward this Information. 

This process, often referred to as the 

, "shot gun" approach, requires that you 

send out dozens, if not several hundred, 



letters and resumes. 

Now you would think that after send- 
ing out hundreds of letters and resumes, 
and after making countless numbers of 
phone calls, that you would be offered 
several positions. Well the truth of the 
mattetb Just the opposite. I'm no longer 
surprised to hear from people who fol- 
lowed this strategy that they received 
maybe one or two responses and even 
these were not exactly what they want- 
' ed. ;;.;_ :: " 

After completing such a seemingly 
thorough Job of seeking employment 
and after getting such a poor response, 
the conclusion that most people draw 
from this experience Is "there are no 
Jobs out there for me". This conclusion 
often turns Into panic and depression. 
At this point most people become des- 
perate and will accept just about any 
job, rather than getting the one they 
really want. 

Unfortunately (or fortunately, if you 
own or work for an employment place- 
ment agency), this Is the time when 
many frustrated and defeated Job 
seekers will seek help from professional 
services and will be willing to pay "big 
bucks: for them to do what they believe 
the can not do for themselves. In addi- 
tion to using placement agencies, 
other resources are often used, such as 
Career Planning and Placement ser- 



vices on college campuses, the 
Department of Employment Security, 
Classified Help Wanted ads. In newspa- 
pers, computerized Job banks, labor 
and trade unions, professional organs 
zatlons, and private head hunting firms: ' 

In spite of the combined resources 
and efforts of the above, research ■ 
clearly reveals that none of the above 
resources. Is, usually more successful, 
than 20 percent of the time. That 
means that for every 100 people who < 
use these resources, 20 or less acluatty 
secure employment from this assist 
tance. If you're part of the -80 percent; 
group who does not find them useful, 
where do you then go when all 
resources have failed? 

That's the bad news. Here's the 
good news. The same research studies 
also Indicate that the best way of 
securing employment Is to seek out 
employers directly by yourself. That Is It, 
put most of your time and energy Into i 
contacting employers who have a 
need for you. 

But there's a catch. Don't use the 
"shot gun" approach and send your, 
resume and letter io every company I 
you think may hire you. That approach 
will not work well for you. Here's a.four 
step strategy you should adopt which 
has demonstrated over the years to 
See JOB HUNTING page CI 6 



... 

i 



CASHIERS/STOCKERS 

Full or Part Time 

2nd> 3rd Shifts & Weekends 
WillTrain 

Apply at ANY of the following J & L 
and Union 76 locations: 

Gurnee Grayslake 

1 8450 W. Grand Ave. 33199 N. Highway 45 



Antioch 
25112 Rte. 173 

Ingleside/Fox Lake 
500 E. Rollins Rd. 



Lake Bluff 
218WaukeganRd. 

Vernon Hills 
202 Route 45 




CARS5R OPPORTUNITIES WITH A 
MAJOR IMPORT DISTRIBUTION COJ 

We offer a paid training progam leading to middle and upper level' 
management learning all areas of this fast-paced business. 

BEGIN EARNING $300/WK (STARTING) 

& PROFIT SHARING TO $30K PLUS (AFTER) 

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY - 
CALL NOW (708) 459-1192 OR FAX - (708) 459-1791 

Attention Richard Toplak 




EMPLOYMENT GUIDE UgUwI Newspapers ScpTCMb» 70, 1994 






>l 






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■7. 



Job Hunting 



From page CI 5 

produce more job offers and better job 

offers than the conventional strategy. 

Stop No. 1— Determine Your Career 
Objective 

Before you even start the process of 
job hunting, know what kind of job you 
want to find. If you do not know what 
you're looking for, how will you know 
where to .look for It, and how will 
employers know what you can do for 
them? 

Do not go Into the job market with a 
vague or general idea of what kind of 
position you want. Many people falsely 
believe that their odds will be Improved 
If they do not Indicate a specific career 
objective on their resume. In their cover 
letters, or In conversations with compa- 
ny representatives. The more general 
they are, the more positions they 
believe they will be offered. This Is a 
fatal mistake. Do not ask the employer 
to determine what type of position you 
should be offered. If you are unclear In 
your objective, the employer will be 
unsure of your value, and you will simply 
be passed over In most situations. . 

If you are unsure of a career direc- 
tion, seek out professional career guid- 
ance before you start your Job search. 
Know what talent (knowledge and 
skills) you possess, and which occupa- 
tions typically require your talent. 

Stop No. 2— Determine Who Needs 
You 

Depending upon your talent, your 
next Job Is to Identify those employers 
who have a need for your assistance. 

Specifically, you need to Identify 
employers who typically hire the kind of 
position you would like to secure. There 
are many ways to Identify potential 



employers, too many to go Into detail In 
this article. However, the commercial 
bookstores are loaded with books on 
how to find potential employers. 

Don't worry whether or not these 
employers have any current employ- 
ment openings. Most job openings are 
never advertised. Therefore, If you only 
seek those with advertised positions, 
you'll be looking at only a fraction of 
the real market. Plus, If you Identify an 
employer at the time an advertisement 
for employment has occurred, you will 
be contacting the employer at the very 
time when the competition will be the 
keenest. You want to get to the 
employer before he or she places a 
public notice for help. This strategy Is 
referred to as finding the "hidden" Job 
market. 

Don't concentrate solely on Just 
those employers who have publicly 
stated that they have an employment 
position available. 

Once you have Identified a list of 
potential employers, eliminate Ihose on 
your list who represent the least attrac- 
tive opportunities. 

Stop No. 3— Determine Why the 
Employer Needs You 

Understand that for the vast majority 
of employers, the decision to hire some- 
one comes down to one simple point. A 
person is hired because he or she Is 
seen as the person best suited to help 
the employer reach his or her business 
goals. This connection between the 
employer's need and your talent Is crit- 
ical to your Job seeking success. 
Understand the connection and you 
can succeed, fall to realize how you 
can help an employer and your appli- 
cation for employment will usually be 



rejected. 

To understand what an employer 
needs and whether or not they need 
you will require you to do some 
research of each company. You need 
to find out such things as, what are the 
company's objectives, how are they 
currently trying to reach those objec- 
tives, are there better ways to reach the 
objectives, what are the current obsta- 
cles which exist that are- prohibiting 
them from reaching those objectives, 
and most Importantly, what role does 
the position you want play In reaching 
those objectives. 

The bottom line here Is Ignore the 
more Informed you are concerning the 
employer's needs and how you can 
help him or her satisfy those needs, the 
better chance you have of convincing 
him or her to hire you. 

To gather this Information, read any- 
thlng and everything you can on the 
company. Call or write and ask for any 
available literature on the company. Its 
product or servfce line, and Its mission 
statement, Talk to anyone employed by 
the company or by a similar company. 
Research the company In various publi- 



cations (check out your local public 
and school libraries). Contact the Better 
Business Bureau In the town where the 
company resides for Information. Talk to 
customers who have purchased prod- 
ucts or services from the company. Talk 
to past employees. In short, take on the 
role of a researcher or "private Investi- 
gator" to gather all the Information you 
possibly can on the company. 

After gathering the Information, you 
will begin to see the "big picture* and 
specifically what they are trying to do. 
Once you recognize their objectives 
and the problems (obstacles) they are 
facing, you can then recognize their 
needs. 

If you have the talent to satisfy their 
needs, then you are someone they are 
going to be most Interested In meeting 
and Hiring. 

Without the above Information, you 
may make the fatal mistake of telling 
the employer only what you need (a 
Job), rather than how you can help him 
or her meet his or her needs. The differ- 
ence between these two points Is easy 
to understand, but critical to your suc- 
cess. 



Right answer can be home answering machine 



If yours Is a small or home office, an 
answer to a number of business troubles 
could be a telephone answering 
machine. If cannot only free you to 
attend to business and go out and get 
more business wlfhout having to worry 
about missing an Important call. It can 
help your home office have a more 
business-like air about It when customer, 
vendors or others call you. 

The Electronics Industries Assn. 
Consumer Electronics Group offers 



these tips on features: 

• Call screening lets you Identify 
callers. 

•Beeperless remote control lets yotr 
call In for your messages while you're 
out working, 

•Variable message and announce- 
ment length. 

•Automatic Interrupt to stop the 
message when you pick up the phone. 

• Message alert, a remote, tone or 
flash so you don't miss a call. 



The Perfect Job 

The Perfect Place. The Perfect Time. 

Come be a part of our team 
in our newly remodeled store. 

If you're looking for a job that fits you perfectly, come to SEAR.S. 
We have work opportunities to match almost any scliedule and 
interest. Arid with over a century of success behind us. we can 
offer you the kind of stability you need. If you're ready for the 
perfect fit you're ready for SEARS. 

•Sales Associates 
•Women's Fashions 
•Home Fashions •Paint 
•Automotive •Receiving •Stock 
Permanent and Seasonal Positions Available 
For more information, 
stop by the General Office . 
at Sears, Vernon Hills, 
Hawthorn Shopping Center. The Perfect Fit 

Sears, [Roebuck and Co. 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 
M/F/D/V 





There's A New 

REMEDY 

For Top Pay & Benefits! 

Our new Deerfield office has immediate new short & long-term assign- 
ments for dependable individuals with the following. skills: 

■Secretarial/Word Processing 
•Macintosh 

•Receptionists/General Clerical 
•Customer Service 

To investigate our highly competitive wages, attractive benefits, flexible sched- 
uling and convenient north & northwest suburban assignments, call Jan at: 

(708)509-3100 



Remedy 



INTELLIGENT STAFFING 



EOE 




$tcTWH%£7^Ttt\ 



SFox Lake area mfg. company is looking for self-motivated individuals with 
some mechanical aptitude and the drive and initiative to lead a team of gen 
•xeral factory employees. Individuals must be able to read and understand blue 
sprints, assist in setting up direct and indirect labor. 

A We have openings^ both on day and night shifts for Dependable FAC 



I 



TORY EMPLOYEES. 

We offer: •Full Benefits 
•401K 

•Paid Hoiidays 
•Paid Vacation 
•Bonuses 

Apply in Person or Call 

815-675-6641 



ACTOWN 






I 



2514 Highview St. Spring Grove, IL 






s 




GIRNEE MILLS 



JOB FAIR 



Friday September 30 3-8 pm • Saturday October 1 10-2 pm 

Gurnee Mills Show Court (Near Entrance H) 



;? 



OVER 300 POSmONSAVAIUBLEil Full T1m>, Part Tlrmr.ndSwonal 



'Mall Housekeeping, Security, Information Booth, Tour and Travel. 



^^•AttarthoogW^^J^tA^Vi^ 


^•♦Amtrtean Tourlatar 


•/•Aamay Pacfurnaa- ■»- 


•A4W Hot Dogs and Mora V 


^•Baitolxon Llnearia v 


•Bad, Bath *. Bayond ;,-: -•:."■ \ •••<>; 


: 'Black Marttat Minerals 


•Bon Voyaga IxtpytQ* * Gifts . 


i>BuroarKJng <;v>' • 


&>CaJun Grin •. : , 


•Capara.Outtat Stora 


•Chloo* 


- ■ . •Chicago Cuba Sport* Outlet v 


•Comfort Inn 


r^EtJahna'Algnar', ■•': • 


y •Expraaaly Portraits 


s^'FannlaMay;- 1 


v. •Ganulna' Kida ' -v;< 


j.: : v- ! «qu— Factory Stora 


♦Gumae Mi'Ia Cuatornar Sarvtca . 


;»JCParmay OutJat -, V 


^'•WdtfCfty' • 


" •KkrtMart > 


•Kohl* 


Y,,:*Lwid%End;;v-;.- 


' .• »Lavia OutJat 


- f »Ma»tarcut» w • , ;•;,, i>.>fe,\il: ; 


•Marry Qb Round 


: »Muafcland \ -* Kv:'-- 


> •S9.99 Stock Room 


^.'"•OaJt Uathar 


; '•Tba'papar. Factory; 


•Routa 66 & Uathar. Makers Sv 


^•Ru^ry'Tuaaday: -. 


?.. *Saka Fifth Avanua ;'•.,■ •;:'.- 


•sb&rro tha Italian Eatary • 


•S&KManswaar 


• •Syndt> Laathar 


; •Tbur&Travai ; • 


.«iX«TJ. Max* ;>•-:;> 


- •TrandClub V :*•' 


^•Vari Meuaan Olract.V< 


•Waccamaw 


•WMtport .; 


•Wild Wild Veet 


' "Windsor SWrt Co. 


-.'•Ultra ^ 


'■',< '■: ." - \ :L ■ •'• ": • ..' .' 



BE PART OF THE EXCITEMENT AT GURNEE MILLSMI 1-800-937-7467 



■fr&S?. n -KAMif ■.;'-., :<^tVV?liriaT*?!fe£%Mj<y!^^^ 



BJaEH <H3B 



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ScpTtMbEH 50, 1994 UkflANd NcwspApcK EMPLOYMENT GUIDE 




Local Manpower operation celebrates 35th anniversary 




This monlh 
the Lake and 
Mc- Henry 
counties 
Manpower 
operation Is 
celebrating Its 
3 5 - y e a r 
anniversary of 
service to the 
community. 
The Man- 
power offices 
In Lake and 
M c H e n r y 
counties com- 
prise one of 
the largest 
Manpower 
operations In the United states. 

Through this 10-offlce network," 
Manpower sends more than 4000 tem- 
porary workers on assignment each 
year to customer firms needing skilled 
workers for office, light Industrial, techni- 
cal and health care positions. 

"Many workers seek employment at 
Manpower to enter or re-enter the 
workforce. About a third of our workers 
actually end up In permanent positions 
wlfh our customers after taking advan- 



tage of our free training and working a 
few temporary assignments/ says 
Charles Bariles, president of the local 
operation. "It's a natural transition for 
both the customer and the worker." 

The first Manpower office In Lake 
County opened In Waukegan in 1959. 
In 1973 the Bartels family acquired the 
operation and has since expanded the 
business to Include offices In 
Waukegan, Vernon Hltls, Wauconda, 
Mc Henry. Marengo, and Harvard. 
Charles and Teresa Hall Bartels are 
active In the business operations and J. 
Michael Bartels is corporate secretary 
and a board member. 

Manpower provides a unique oppor- 
tunity for many workers. It Is a flexible 
option for parents, seniors, students, and 
those In career transitions. Many other 
employees work for Manpower as a 
career— with more than 10 years of ser- 
vlcel *W9 believe In Investing In our 
employees and giving them opportuni- 
ties for self-development," says Teresa 
Hall Bartels, vice president of the local 
operation. Manpower employees are 
eligible for health care benefits, and flex- 
ible spending account, computer train- 
ing, skills assessment and enhancement, 
unique work experiences and more. 



'Organizational Survival' convention set 



By attending a public relations con- 
vention you may be able to do more 
and better business. 

The 1994 Public Relations Society of 
America (PRSA) convention will be held 
In Baltimore, Maryland from November 
13 through 16. 

At the convention, members of the 
society and members of the public can 



attend lectures, meetings and seminars 
on the theme: "Organizational Survival: 
Connecting With The New American 
Values." 

For a free brochure about the con- 
vention, write on a business letterhead 
to: 

Conference Dept., PRSA, 33 Irving 
Place, New York, NY 10003-2376. 



.3 



M 



MIDWEST 



Staffing Systems, Inc. 

Career Opportunities Await You 

In Assembly, Machine Operation, 

Data Entry and General Office 

DO flOT DEUW! immCDIftTC OPEMftGS! 

Medical & Dental Benefits 

Holiday Pay 

Vacation Pay 

Full Time and Part Time Positions Available 

in Lake, McHenry and Kane Counties 

COME IN OR CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT TODAY 

(815)455-1650 

256 N. Oak Street 
Crystal Lake, IL 6001 2 



Seasonal Job Opportunity 

' We are a direct mail company seeking individuals Full Time during our 

busy season October through December. Hours are 7:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

Monday-Friday. Work in a clean, modern air-conditioned facility. 

*FOIL STAMP MACHINE OPERATOR 

'ASSEMBLERS 

*PR00F READERS 

♦TYPIST 

Contact Ray Miller 

BALDWIN COOKE 

2401 Waukegan Rd. 

(near Half Day RdJRoute 22) 

Deerfteld, IL 

(708) 948-7635 

EOE 



Manpower has become a world- 
wide force In computer training. To 
meet the demand for skilled computer 
operators, the company developed 
Sklllware®, a hands-on self-paced com- 
puter training program. All Manpower 
employees are offered the training free 
of charge. 

Training doesn't stop at the key- 
board. Manpower recently developed 
a comprehensive service quality train- 
ing program for Its temporary work- 
force. The training Is based on Its cus- 
tomers' expectations of temporary 
worker performance. 

"Our research found that companies 
need temporary workers with more than 



just technical skills. Companies are focus- 
ing on customer satisfaction through 
quality service and demand the same 
commitment from temporary help firms 
and temporary workers," says Bartels. . 

Bartels' Lake and McHenry counties 
offices are part of Manpower's network 
of 2,000 offices In 36 countries. The 
world's largest temporary help firms 
and temporary workers," says Bartels. 

Bartels' Lake and McHenry counties 
offices are part of Manpower's network 
of 2.000 offices In 36 countries. The 
world's largest temporary help firm, 
Manpower annually provides employ- 
ment to more than one million people 
worldwide. 



Health Care 

CNA/NA 

Seeking CNA's for all shifts FT/PT. 
Flexible scheduling available. Sign 
on Bonus, Facility will reimburse for 
certification. Contact M. McAdams 




Account Receivable 

Seeking a recent graduate to be 
responsible for Resident Account. 
Ideal position for an entry-level 
health care accounting. Contact J Roe 



Social Service 

Experienced person needed to run 
Psych/Social groups in skilled care 
nursing facility. Contact C. Canale 



Please call, send or fax resume 

Lake Bluff Health Care Centre 

700 Jenkisson Ave. 

Lake Bluff, IL 60044 

708-295-3900. Fax: 295-3989 




r : 




TARGET 



^ 





LOOKING FOR EXTRA 
SPENDING MONEY!" 

Whether you're looking for a way to earn extra spending money 
or a career in retail, Target Greatland is the place for you!!! We 
have flexible entry-level and supervisory positions available for 
day, evening, and overnight availabilities. We offer: 

*$5.25/hour for entry level positions 
*$7.00/hour for supervisory positions 

*experience a must 
*Fast, fun, and friendly working environment 
*10% discount 

If you're ready to work for a rapidly growing upscale retailer in the 
Chicagoland area, then please come and apply at: 

TARGET 
GREATLAND 



i. 



6601 W. Grand 
Cumee, IL 60031 

Target is a smoke-free, drug-free and 
an equal opportunity employer 



J 












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^ r ] EMPLOYMENT GUIDE LaI<cI^ ^pers ScptemBer 70, 1994 _=^= ====— ^=^= 

Resumes: Saying only what you need to say 



The four most commonly used 
resume styles are described below. 

(1) Chronological— This style (the 
most common and traditional) Incorpo- 
rates a listing of the job seeker's work 
history starting with the most current 
position and working back In time. Each 
Job Is described In terms of a title, dales 
of employment, employer's name and 
a description of the duties and accom- 
plishments. No mention of a specific Job 
objective Is recommended with this 
style. 

This resume style Is recommended If 
you have a solid work history with no 
gaps In time. If the Job you want Is 
directly related to your work history, or If 
you have worked for a well known 
company and you want to use the 
company's name to bolster your pro- 



fessional Image and reputation. 

(2) Functional— This more contempo- 
rary style Incorporates a listing of the Job 
seeker's major areas of knowledge or 
accomplishments, usually arranged In 
priority from the most developed skills to 
the least developed skills, (Note; you 
may also arrange your skills In any order 
to best support whatever position you 
are seeking). Job titles, names of 
employers, dates of employment and a 
description of duties are usually left out 
when this style Is used. Like the 
Chronological style above, no mention 
of a specific Job objective Is recom- 
mended with this style. This resume style 
Is recommended If you are making a 
career change and are attempting to 
secure a position very different from 
your p^at work history, This style Is also 




TARGET 




Target Greatland in Vernon Hills is already a substantial player in Chicagoland's retail scene. But we're not 
slowing down. We're going to increase our circle of excellence to extend even further throughout 
Chicagoland. This means even more entry-level and supervisory opportunities for you. To find out how you 
can be a part of TARGET'S inner circle of excellence apply at 

TARGET GREATLAND 

313 E.Townline Rd. • Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

(708) 680-0390 
Mon.-Sun. 8 am - 9:30 pm 

EOE DRUG FREE 

KEY HOURLY SUPERVISORS 

•Supervisory Experienced Preferred 

• Wages Start at $7.25/hr. 

• Comprehensive Benefit Package 
•Opportunities for Advancement 



SP 






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■ 




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COURTYARD. 

«> Harriott 

Deerfield 

Competitive pay, 

Excellent working 

environment. 

Best Benefits In The Business! 

Desk Clerk - Full Time 

Please stop by to fill out 
an application. 

800 Lake Cook Rd. 
Deerfield, IL 

(708) 940-8222 

EOEM/F/V/D 






useful If you are seeking your first Job 
(you have no work history), or when you 
are re-entering the Job market and you 
have gaps of time when you did not 

work. 

(3) Targeted— This style Incorporates 
Information found In both of the styles 
listed above— Information about your 
work history and major areas of skills 
and knowledge. The main difference 
wllh a targeted resume Is that you DO 
mention the title of the position you are 
seeking, and then list those skills and 
accomplishments you have had and 
relevant work experience which are 
related to your Job objective. In short, 
the whole resume Is geared or focused 
at one specific job (target). 

The resume style Is recommended 
when you are confident In your Job 
objective and have related knowl- 
edge, skills and experience to support 



your objective. 

(4) Alternative— This style On the form 
of a business letter) requires that you 
first research the companyfles) you 
would like to work for'to learn what their 
business objectives are and what they 
need In terms of talent, and then pre- 
pare a letter describing how you (with 
that same talent) can be of help to 
them. 

While this style requires more work 
(I.e. the research) than the other styles, 
It can offer certain Individuals with limi- 
tations fj.e. those people with Work 
gaps, no work experience, etc.) an 
opportunity to be seen as talented and 
valuable. This style has also been used 
very successfully by Individuals who 
could use one of the three styles listed 
above, but who wanted to demon- 
strate a uniqueness and willingness to 
focus In on the employer's needs. 



How to answer ads more effectively 



Unemployment rates continue to 
soar. So how do you wage a. successful 
Job-search campaign today? Answer- 
ing newspapers, ads still works, but you 
must be careful. 

To help cut through the resume clut- 
ter follow the following tips: 

•P. O. Box numbers can be an 
obstacle because you cannot address 
your cover letter to a specific person. In 
many cases, however, you can Identify 
the company and subsequently the 
person to whom you can address your 
letter by calling the post office that rep- 
resents the zip code In the address. 
Often the post office will tell you the 
company. This won't work, however, If 
the company rented Its box through 
the newspaper In which It advertised. 

•If the first sentence In your cover 
letter says, "This letter Is In response to 
your ad," you will sound just like the 



other 150 to 400 applicants. Try a differ- 
ent approach. Go the the library and 
get an annual report or trade maga- 
zine article .about the company, Then 
writ a beginning paragraph that 
addresses how your qualifications can 
help a company Increase their profits, 
market share or save them money. 

•Edit, proof and edit agalnl Keep 
sentences In your cover letter short and 
crisp. Letters and resumes must be 
grammatically perfect. It just takes one 
typo and a millisecond to send your 
credentials flying Into the proverbially 
circular files. Therefore, do not try to 
Write your materials In one night or In 
one sitting. Finally, don't mention 
salary, bonus or perquisites 

The key to obtaining a better response 
from employment ads Is targeting your 
cover letter and resume to particular 
employers and the positions you seek. 




Old Country Store 



IS HIRING 

•6 Servers 
•3 Cooks 
•4 Cashiers 

DAYS, NIGHTS 
& WEEKENDS 

•Great Benefits 
•No Tip Sharing 
•Weekly Paycheck, 




See Manager for Details 
Come by Mon.~Fri. 

CRACKER BARREL 

GURNEE 

(708)244-1512 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 




j^ssnj^s* 



a r' j'aMtf mu t iiin w, UN WWSJjl 



»^S5 S335^i3 S' 



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Siprimbu JO, 1»94 UktlANd NcwpapEK EMPLOYMENT GUIDE 








opportunities 
for women and minorities 



Is It worth the effort to design recruit- 
ment programs for minority and 
women franchisees? A growing num- 
ber of franchisers. Including Dynamark, 
Staff Builders and Ben & Jerry's answer 
wllh d resounding "Yes," 

It's a response that makes a lot of 
sense. Consider this: as our communi- 
ties grow more culturally diverse, suc- 
cessful businesses are those that reflect 
this new diversity. Franchisers who rec- 
ognize this are now actively seeking 
and attracting top qualify Indlvldu 
als who might have been missed. 
Simply put: franchisers know. It 
makes good business sense to 
create opportunities for Individ- '. 
uals who have played a part In 
their company's success over 
the years. 

In addition to minorities, a 
growing number of women 
have been attracted to 
franchising. Here are some 
facts about lhat area of 
the $800 billion a year 
franchising business that 
may surprise you. 
According to the 
Internationa! Franchise 
Association (IFA), about 
18.5 percent of the 
nation's 550,000 fran- 
chises are now 
owned by women 
This Is a dramatic 
Increase from 
about three percent In the early 1 980's. 

In order to help women already In 
franchising and Introduce others to this 
exciting field, a new Women's 
Franchise Network (WFN) was formed 
that will create more opportunities at 



every level. 

According to WFN Chairperson, 
Linda L. Burzynskl, "Franchising Is an 
excellent opportunity and career alter- 
native for women. In fact, women are 
starting businesses at twice the rate of 
men. Yet, education will be the key to 
our efforts because women often 
aren't aware of the many diverse 
careers In franchising." According to 
members of the Alliance for Minority 
Opportunities In Franchising, the IFA 
Is making a significant effort to 
Insure the continued growth of 
minority franchises and vendors. 
By pooling Information and 
resources, they have opened 
lines of communication with 
major minority and women's 
organizations to Increase 
Ihe level of awareness of 
opportunities In franchising. 
The Alliance currently 
Includes minority media 
that regularly provide 
franchising Information, 
financing resources and 
sources for general small 
business Information. 
Franchising Is a growing 
business for everybody, 
expanding at twice 
the rate of the econ- 
omy and creating 
more than 

170,000 new Jobs 
last year alone. 
-by TERRIAN BARNES-BRYANT 

Editor's note: Barnes-Bryant fs vice 
president of research and diversity ser- 
vices for the International Franchise 
Assn., Washington, D.C. 






je£&£di/0S<**Aa*}> 



Sales Associates 

Eddie Bauer, a leading specialty retailer for 74 years with 
over 300 locations throughout North America, invites highly 
motivated individuals to grow with us and become part of 
our sales team at the following locations: 

Hawthorne 

Northbrook 

Woodfleld 

Applicants must: 

•Possess retail sales experience 
•Be energetic and service-oriented 
•Be able to thrive in a sales-driven environment 
We offer competitive salaries and comprehensive benefits, 
including 30% merchandise discount, If you are one of the 
unique people that we seek, please apply in person at the 
above Eddie Bauer locations. 

EOE M/F/D/V 







You're In 

Good Company At 

Jewel 



Our helpful staff of employees 
includes senior citizens, students, 
moms and professionals all with a 
common interest.... delivering friendly 
service to our customers. 

We now have part time job openings 
available in various departments. You 
will enjoy: 

•A variety of part-time jobs 

•Flexible hours 

•Paid vacations 

-•Group medical & dental ^. 

•Timely raises & promotions ^ 

►401K profit sharing -¥ 

•Persona) days * 






« To find out more, visit the 
\]u : : Store Manager in one of the . ••:£* 

VtAV" nnmmi initios helnw: '"**,*. 



■Saturday 
8am - 7pm 

Buffalo Grove Mundelein 
.Lake Zurich Deerfield 
Round Lake Wauconda 
Waukegan 
Antioch 
ibertyville 



ighland 
Lake Forest 



equal opportunity employer 



& 




fl EMPLOYMENT GUIDE LaIceIancI NcwspApERS SfprcMbER JO, 1994 



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Turn those 'negatives' into 'positives' during interviews 



If your qualifications are not exem- 
plary and you have some troubled 
spots on your resume, don't worry. The 
employer may need an explanation, 
additional Information or a new Inter- 
pretation If you have something In your 
employment history which Is negative 
or Is the kind of thing frowned on by 
employers. 

It's up to you to provide a positive 
explanation, either In response to a 
question or on your own Initiative. 

The following Is a list of "negatives" 
which can be turned Into positives. 
Job Hopping 

Employer: It seems that you have 
problems holding onto a Job, Mr. X. 
Why do you change Jobs so often? 

Possible Solution: Mr. Employer, It's 
true that I have held a lot of jobs. I tried ■ 



a variety of things and learned what I 
like to do and.whaf I can do well. I 
assure you that If you give me the 
chance to work for your company, you 
will have a stable, dependable 
employee. It's time that I settled 
down." 

Notice that you can agree you were 
a Job-hopper, but then turn It around to 
your advantage. Also, you can be 
reassuring that you will stay with this 
employer. 
Firing 

Employer: "Why were you ffred from 
your last job, Mr. X?" 

Possible Solution: "To be honest, I 
was at fault. I was unhappy with the 
Job, didn't, take an Interest In It, missed 
a lot of time. I realize I was wrong and 
would never be that unfair to my 



Education 



^=KjnderCare Teachers? 



Arc YOU a person who has made an intentional choice to work with young children? 

Do YOU find satisfaction working with young children and investing in their growth? 

Do YOU enjoy using your creativity to its fullest extent? 

Do YOU believe that each child is a unique individual with special needs and lalcnls? 

Are YOU a person who believes that children need love and encouragement daily? 

Do YOU believe "LEARNING should he FUN"? 

Arc YOU a person who enjoys working in a positive environment? 

Do YOU enjoy being a "Team Player" where the children are the "Winners"? 



I If you can answer YES to these questions and have the minimum edu-l 
cational requirements of 2 years of college with 6 hours in Early! 
Childhood (or a related field), then KinderCare Learning Centers is 
the ideal place for you. We offer a comprehensive benefit package as| 
well as room for professional growth and promotions. Due to phe- 
nomenal growth and expansion, we have openings for Teachers in the| 
following suburban KinderCare locations: 



Algonquin 
JLibertyville 
I Vernon Hills 

Buffalo Grove 



Gurnee 

Gary 

Lake Zurich 



▲ 



KkidirCare 



PLEASE CALL OUR EMPLOYMENT HOTLINE: (708-836-5508) 

Por the location nearest you. KinderCare is an l-Ol- Employer. 



ENARD9 



EN'ARD 



MENARD'S] 



in C]urncc 
NOW HIRING!! 

An Exciting Home Center Store with... 

•Building Materials •Millwork 

•Hardware -Wallcoverings 

•Electrical *Floorcoverings 

•Plumbing and Housewares 

APPLY NOW!! 

We are looking for friendly, helpful 
and hardworking Associates who want 
Career Opportunities or Extra Income. 

JOIN OUR TEAM AS... 

•Cashiers *Sales Associates 

•Customer Service -Manager Trainees 

We encourage applications from all 
interested Senior Citizens. 

No experience necessary ... we'll train you 
to help our customers. 

YOU WILL FIND... 

•Excellent Pay and Benefits 

•Instant Profit Sharing 

•Associate Discounts 

•Advancement Opportunities 

•Flexible Work Hours 

To complete an application 

COME VISIT US 

In Our Store at 

6401 Grand Avenue 

Gurnee, IL 

(Across from Gurnee Mills) 

Monday thru Friday 
9 AM to 7 PM 

An Eqii.il Opportunity Employoi 



©SEEGEEJ 



6ayV;N3 



employer again. I've learned from my 
mistake." 

Possible Solution: "To be honest, It 
was a different situation. I'm sure my 
employer had sincere and good rea- 
sons for firing me. He felt 
that I was out sick too 
often and perhaps he 
was right. However, 
before last winter, 
have always had a 
good attendance 
record and I'm 
confident that 
this will not be a 
problem In the 
future." 

Note that you 
can just admit to 
being fired. Own 
up to the reasons 
and reassure the 
employer that It won't 
happen again. Often, people get 
defensive about being fired, but It's 
better to admit you may have been at 
fault. 
Older Worker 

Employer: (This might be a hidden 
agenda Item which the employer will 




not bring up In an Interview. It's a good 
Idea to Introduce the topic yourself.) 

Possible Solution: "there Is something 
I'd like to discuss with you, Mr. 
Employer. As. someone 
who has worked for 25 
years as a secretary and 
office worker, I feel 
that I have experl- 
ence, stability and 
perspective to offer 
your company. I 
hope that you will 
value a iong 
record of achieve- 
ment and perfor- 
mance . such as 
mine." 

No Work Experience 
Employer: 
"Since you just graduat- 
ed from school, you 
have no work experi- 
ence. Why should I hire you?" 

Possible Solution: "It's true that I have 
no experience at this kind of work. 
What I do have Is energy, initiative, 
motivation and i'm willing to learn. Give 
me a chance to show what I can do for 
you." 



Just a phone call away 

•The National Association for the Self-Employed is offering a free copy of an illus- 
trated book that explains health care reform issues and proposals. Call 1(800)414- 
CHOICE and ask for a copy of "We The People." 

•Think you can manage a blue-collar business with your white-collar back- 
ground? Many are doing Just that For information about CertaPro Painters, a resi- 
dential and commercial painting franchise company based in Valley Forego, PA call 
1(800)462-3782. 

•The Uniqube is a patented, modular system with built-in design features that 
can help you conquer the cluttered inner spaces in your home or office and get 
organized. For a free catalog call 1(800)599-8222. 



.{^; ;•.!», i . 



BANKS OF 
NORTHERN ILLINOIS 

Waukegan Gurnee Libertyville 

Lake Bluff Glenview 

WE HAVE THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE AND DETAIL-MINDED 

INDIVIDUALS WITH EXCELLENT WORK HISTORY: 

TELLER 

LIBERTYVILLE and WAUKEGAN 

Teller or very heavy cash handling experience 
having balanced own cash drawer. • 

PERSONAL BANKER 

LAKE BLUFF and WAUKEGAN 

2+ years personal banking experience with 
some lending or trust experience preferred. 

MORTGAGE LOAN PROCESSOR 

BUFFALO GROVE and WAUKEGAN 

3+ years experience in all phases Of 
mortgage including FHA and VA. 

MORTGAGE LOAN ORIGINATORS 

ALL LOCATIONS 

2+ years solid track record of successful origination. 

COLLECTOR 

GLENVIEW 

2+ years heavy collections, preferably finance company. 

We offer an excellent salary and benefit package. 
Please call 708-623-3800 for interview appointment 

EOE/MF 






^*V— J J^ i— **-»^ 



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What bosses are looking for 



When 'you're going to an Interview, 
you've got to be at the top of your 
game, There are eight factors you should 
remember when being Interviewed. 

•Appearance— Is the general 
appearance favorable? This Includes 
everylhlng from stature, posture, per- 
sonal hygiene and neatness. 

• Personality— To what degree Is the 
applicant's personality likable? This 
Includes friendliness, maturity. Interests, 
self-confidence, manners and overall 
communication in verbal responses 
and silent body language. 

•Experience— Does Ihe applicant 
have any background or experience 
which would enhance his ability to per- 
form welt In the Job In question? Does 
experience prove a history of Job stabil- 
ity and career progress? 

•Education— Is the applicant's edu- 
cation related to and adequate for the 



job In question? Will additional training 
be necessary? Is academic record sat- 
isfactory or even above average? 

•Potential— Does applicant give evi- 
dence of ability to succeed and show 
Initiative In position In question? This will 
Include a discussion of personal goals 
and career objectives. Are the appli- 
cant's skills transferable? 

•Conversation— Can applicant 
adequately express himself? This will 
Include an analysis of voice quality, 
appropriateness of responses and 
quantity of responses. 

•Enthuslam— Does applicant show a 
sincere Interest In the position and enthu- 
siasm for the career field? Is the appli- 
cant willing to make some sacrifices for 
Improved business performance? 

•Reasoning and Judgment— Does 
the applicant show alert, logical rea- 
soning and sound Judgment? 



Top 20 questions frequently asked & 



These are the Top 20 questions most 
likely to be asked, according to The 
Endlcott- Report of Northwestern 
University. 

1. What .are your long-range and 
short-range goals and objectives; when 
and why did you establish these goals: 
how are you preparing yourself to 
achieve them? 

2. What do' you see yourself doing 
five years from now? 

3. How do you plan to achieve your 
career goals? 

4. Which Is more Important to you: 
Money or Type of Job. 

5. What do you consider to be.your 
greatest strengths and weaknesses. 

6. How do you think a friend, teacher 
or former employer would describe 
you? 

7. What motivates you to put forth 
your greatest effort? 

8. Why should I hire you? 

9. How do you evaluate or deter- 
mine success? 



10. In what ways do you think you 
can make a contribution to our com- 
pany? 

1 1 . What qualities should a successful 
manager possess? 

12. What two or three accomplish- 
ments have given you the most satis- 
faction? Why? 

13. If you were hiring somebody for 
this position, what qualities would you 
look for? 

14. In what kind of work environment 
are you most comfortable? 

15. How do you work under pressure? 
; 16. Why did you decide to seek a 

position wilh this company? 

17. What do you know about our 
company? 

1 8. What two or three things are most 
Important to you in your Job. 

19. what criteria are you using to 
evaluate the company for which you 
hope to work? 

20. What have you teamed from 
your mistakes? 



Hurray To The 



Wi 



Kelly® temporary employees 

are tops. Thanks for being 

part of our team. 

We're always looking for good 

players. So tell your friends 

to call Kelly too. 

Office Clerical ■ Light Industrial 
■ Marketing ■ Technical 

NATIONAL TEMPORARY HELP WEEK 

OCTOBER2-8 

Join Our Winning Team Today! 
Libertyville (708)367-1144 
Lake Zurich (708)550-1150 
Crystal Lake (815) 477-0411 
Gurnee (708)662-0770 



l^Cliy Temporary 



Services 



An Equal Opportunity Employer 
©1994 Kelly Services, Inc. 



Stpiwhen 10, 1994 UkcM NEWspupfus EMPLOYMENT CUIDE 



SECURITY OFFICERS! 

Immediate Openings in 

Lake County, Mt. Prospect, Libertyville, Crystal Lake 

•Premium Pay •Uniforms Provided 

•FREE Life Insurance -FREE P.E.R. Registration 

•FREE State Training •Medical/Dental Available 

•Tuition Reimbursement *Paid Vacations 
•Excellent Benefits!! 

Apply in Person 
Wed. & Thurs. 10am - 3pm 

GUARDSMARK 

1590 S. Milwaukee Ave. - Suite 205 
Libertyville, IL 

708-367-7935 

EOE" 





Ik, 



CNA'S 



Are you looking for flexibility in your schedule? 

Are you looking for a facility that is progressive 
and that offers competitive salaries? 

Are you looking for benefits and health 
packages that are optional and fit your needs? 

If you answered "yes" to any of the 

above, we would enjoy the opportunity to 

meet with you and discuss your future. 



CqllSuzy 



ACTIVITY 
ASSISTANT 

If you are enthusiastic, motivated, 

and enjoy the elderly, then we have 

the job for you. Join our Activity 

Department team and look forward to 

a rewarding career in long term care. 

Call Jerri 



(708)438-8275 

MAPLE HILL NURSING CENTER 
Long Grove, Illinois 



E.O.E. 



If you're ready far a 
career opportunity, we 

welcome you to become 
a member of our 



We Offer... *A pleasant working atmosphere 

•Competitive wages 
•Opportunity for advancement 

FULLTIME BENEFITS ALSO INCLUDE... 

•HOLIDAY PAY •MEDICAL INSURANCE 

•LIFE INSURANCE *PAID VACATION 
•PROFIT SHARING -EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT 

WE ARE LOCALLY OWNED AND DEDICATED 
TO SUPPORTING OUR COMMUNITIES 

-6 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS- 

AGE; Hardware 



ROUND LAKE 



Route 134 
(708) 546-4668 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 



Route 83 & Rollins 
(708) 223-0190 



LIBERTYVILLE 



Route 21 & 137 
(708) 362-3340 



MUNDELEIN 



609 E. Hawley 
(708)566-1100 



GURNEE 



Grand Ave. & Rt. 21 
(708) 336-0101 



LAKEHURST 



Route 120, Waukegan 
(708) 473-0320 




it * f 

' EMPLOYMENT GUIDE La^Ianc! Ncwsp/vpERS ScpTCMbcH 10, 1994 






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Helpful rules for writing cover letters to get a job 




While there are no hard and fast 

rules which are universally accepted 

» and which govern the writing of 

employment letters, there are several 



conditions which most Job. seeking 
experts agree should be taken Into 
consideration. For example, 

•Always attempt to direct your letter 
to a specific Individual, preferably the 
person who has authority over the posi- 
tion you seek. This may mean doing a 
little research to discover the person's 
name, but well worth the effort. 

•Always make mention of the prod- 
uct line or services which the company 
offers, or some of the major business 
activities In which the company is 
Involved. In other words, demonstrate 
to the reader that you are well 
Informed about their business activities. 

•Always mention how your expert- 




Saks Fifth Avenue, 
The Clearinghouse 

is looking for friendly energetic people to fill the following 
entry-level full-time and part-time positions: 

•CASHIERS 

•SALES ASSOCIATES 

•LOSS PREVENTION DETECTIVE 

•CUSTOMER SERVICE SUPERVISOR 

Gut positions include day, night and weekend hours, we 

require flexibility when scheduling. Please apply in person at 

the store located in the Gurnee Mills Mall, suite 421 (right 

across from Waccamaw). Our phone number is 

(708) 662-0988. We are an E/O/E, M/E 



PAIGE TEMPORARY, INC. 

OFFICE POSITIONS 

FULL TIME AND PART TIME 
$6.75 - $14.00 PER HOUR 

'General Office 'Data Entry 

*Word Processing 'Secretarial 

'Reception 'Customer Service 

Due to heavy client demand throughout LAKE COUNTY, we need indi- 
viduals for a variety of office assignments ASAP! Paige offers top pay, 
bonuses, free computer software training and BENEFITS! You will work 
at the BEST AREA COMPANIES plus many positions lead to permanent 
employment. Contact Jeanne Randolph for interview. 

VERNON HILLS 

1 1 75 Corporate Woods Pkwy 

Suite 110 

(708) 634-6622 



EDWARD 

HINES 

LUMBER 



We are looking for 

several reliable, 

energetic people 

for a variety 

of positions: 

•Cashiers Full/Part Time 

•STOCKERS (Days) FULL/PART TIME 

•Salespeople Full/Part Time 

(experience in millwork and lumber a plus; 

but we will train the right people) 

Days, evenings, ana* weekend hours possible 

APPLY IN PERSON; PLEASE SEE 

CINDYORJOHN 

Edward Hikes Lumber 

1 100 Rand Rd., Wauconda 
708/526-9000 



ence or talents fits Into the company's 
mission or business activities. Don't 
assume the reader can determine your 
value-tell the reader how you can be of 
value to him or her. 

• Don't focus only on what you want 
In your career or Job search. 

Focus In on how you can help the 
employer with his or her business needs 
and goalsl 

•Always ask for an opportunity to dis- 
cuss how you can be of value to the 
employer. In short, ask for an Interview. 
Don't "soft pedal* your words hoping 
the reader will figure out that you're 
looking for an Interview. 

•Always try to deep your letter to 
one page-single spaced and typed 



with a clear and readable typestyle. 
Use a good quality paper. 

•Don't use slang or abbreviations- 
use traditional grammar and writing 
style. Don't try to get fancy In an effort 
to catch the reader's attention. 

•Always check your letter for errors In 
spelling, grammar, and punctuatlonl 

•Don't ask the reader to "get back 
to you". Tell the reader you will call, stop 
In, or write back to further discuss your 
mutual employment Interest. 

•Always try to use language which Is 
familiar to the reader. 

Don't use acronyms which the read- 
er may be unfamiliar with, but do try to 
use trie "vocabulary" which Is appropri- 
ate for the position you seek. 



Things to know before you apply 



The first step In preparing for your Job 
Interview should be researching the 
company. This should be completed 
prior to applying since one never knows 
when the Interview will take place. 

Know the answers In advance to the 
following questions should help you pre- 
pare pertinent questions to ask the 
prospective employers. It also will show 
the employer that you are Informed 
about and Interested In the company. 
Key research questions: 

What does the company do? How 
old is the company? What Industries 
does It serve? What product/services 
does It provide? How large Is the com- 
pany? Does the company have a 
good reputation? Why is this Job open? 
What Is the policy for advancement? 

The answers to these questions 
should help you formulate a clearer 
Idea of what your future might be with 
this particular company. 

It should also help you to answer the 
critical question of "Why do you want 



to work here?" 
Sources of Information 

Local Chamber of Commerce: The 

Chamber will have Information con- 
cerning most companies and business- 
es In the area. 

Library: The librarian can help with 
resources for Information on company 
background, such as manufacturing 
directories or sources on. Fortune 500 
companies. 

Call The Company: Another source 
of Information Is to call the company 
and ask for printed Information, If avail- 
able. You can also talk to someone 
about the history and background of 
the company. 

Talk to Someone Who Has Worked at 
the Company: Talk to someone, who 
works at the company. That person 
may be able to provide some valuable . 
background Information. Be cautious in 
talking to some people. They may give 
you misinformation. Be sure your 
sources are reliable. 



IMMEDIATE OPENINGS 

1ST, 2ND and 3RD SHIFTS 

All levels of PLASTICS INJECTION MOLDING 

Setup Operators 

Mold Makers 

Molding Machine Helpers 

AUTOMOTIVE ASSEMBLY GROUP 

Assemblers 

Machine Operators 

Automation Technicians 

PUNCH PRESS 

Punch Press Setup Operators 

QUALITY ASSURANCE 

Lab Technician 

We also have weekend shifts available (8 and 12 hours) ! ! ! 

Cherry offers a comprehensive benefit package including 
excellent starting wage, medical and dental insurance, paid 
holidays, vacations, tuition reimbursement and 401 K Savings and 
Retirement Plan. 

COME IN AND APPLY! 
IMMEDIATE INTERVIEWS! 





Cherry Electrical Products 

3600 Sunset Avenue 

W aukegan, Illinois 60087 

708/662-9200 
Job Hot Line: 708/360-3377 



eoe/m/f/d/v 



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StpTtNben 50, 1994 UkelANd Newspapers EMPLOYMENT GUIDE 




Midwest Staffing offers 
benefits for temporaries 




Offering benefits such as medical 
Insurance and vacation time, Midwest 
Staffing of McHenry Is unique among 
area employment agencies, 

"We are a staffing agency," said 
Lee Van Syckle. "We specialize In plac- 
ing light Industrial and clerical posh 
tlons." 

Midwest Staffing does the prelimi- 
nary work often done by an employer 
when a new employee enters the com- 
pany. 

"We start with a pre-appllcatlon. 
Following * that a prospective place- 
ment Is brought In for an Interview as 
well as several work-related te rf ," said 



Van Syckle. "We even do drug screen- 
ing on applicants." 

Van Syckle says the employment 
steps he utilizes enables him to deliver a 
temporary employee to a client who Is 
ready to go to work on their first day. 

"Most of the positions we place are 
full-time 40 hours a week," said Van 
Syckle. 

"We place positions that are for 1- 2 
days or for several months," 

Midwest Staffing places applicants 
primarily in McHenry County but also 
has clients In Lake and Kane counties. 

For more Information contact Van 
Syckle at (815) 455-1650. 



How to find work with 
the best companies. 

Call Manpower. Temporary assignments now available. 



O MANPOWER 



® 






Vernon Hills • (708) 918-1200 Wauconda • (708) 526-4300 
McHenry • (8 15) 385-6600 Waukegan • (708) 473-4300 
Harvard • (815) 943-8100 Marengo • (815) 568-0100 
Health Care and Technical • (708) 473-4300 




Wauconda 



McDonald's 

■ 



® 



■ 



JOIN THE TEAM! 

• NOW HIRING ALL SHIFTS * 

•Flexible Hours 
•Uniforms Provided 

•Free Employee Meals 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE 

APPLY IN PERSON 

511 W. Liberty 
McDonalds Wauconda, IL 

9 ■<$) 



DUNHAM'S SPORTS OUTFITTERS, The leading discount retailer of 
sports apparel and equipment, has opportunities available for ener- 
getic, outgoing Individuals to join our team as: 

ASSISTANT STORE MANAGER 

Previous retail management experience preferred with strong merchandising 
skills. SEND RESUME TO: 2563 S. 108TH STREET, WEST ALUS, Wl 53227 

DEPARTMENT MANAGERS 

Experience/knowledge of Field & Stream, Skiing, Exercise helpful 

HEAD CASHIER & FULL TIME SALES ASSOCIATES 

Dunham's offers a competitive salary and benefits package, including an 
employee discount. APPLY IN PERSON, MONDAY - FRIDAY, 10AM - 8PM AT: 

TTV^^V 7 -^-^— fe"' LAKEHURST MALL 
D Jilt) J fifS n fi L^ 124 LAKEHURST ROAD 

WAUKEGAN E.O.E 





Are you looking for 

something more than 

"just a job?" 



If you are, come talk to the people at The 

Private Industry Council of 
Lake County (PIC). 

Our friendly employment and training 
specialists can help you find no-cost 
training that will lead to a satisfying 
and stable career. 

PIC offers all types of 
training in today's 
most demanded fields, 
including word processing, 
health assisting, truck 
driving, electronic office 
machine repair and much 
much more. 

For information about training, call PIC today. 

(708) 249-2200 —• 



The Private Industry Council of Lake County 

415 Washington St., Waukegan, IL 60085 




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EMPLOYMENT GUIDE LaIccIawI Newspapers Septet* JO, 1994 



Burlington 

Mnt Atllll/ttGd with M*M*^+ *m^ B^S|)CtOfy 



Nor affiliated with 
Burlington Industries 



I 



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s 



Coat 

Quality, Fashion 

Merchandise and 

Talented People Succeed 

at Burlington ... Join 

Our Exciting Team! 

* Asst. Store Mats. 

* Department Mgrs. 

* Sales Associates 

* Cash Office Personnel 

* Cashiers 

* Maintenance/Receiving 

We Offer: 

• Excellent Salary & Benefits 

• Rapid Career Advancement 

Apply in Person at: 

6104 W. Grand Ave. 920 S. Milwaukee A 

Gurnee, IL 60031 or Liberty ville, IL 60048 

708-855-0565 708-680-8150 




wem& 



/ 



While enjoying the benefits 






of working in your own neighborhood. 

Meet new people everyday. Manage your own career as an advertising and pub* 
lie relations professional with Wekome Wagon. We can answer your financial 
needs with various earnings opj&riimiues. Openings available throughout Lake, 
McHenry and Cook Counties, 



® 



For a personal interview, contact Maria (708) 577-3637 

WELCOME WAGON 

international, inc. 

Equal Opportunity Employer 




Midwest Impulse seeking employees 
to grow along with company 



With the motto "There Is no substi- 
tute," Midwest Impulse Is seeking 
career-minded Individuals with a strong 
work ethic and desire to learn to 
become a part of their rapidly growing 
company. 

Full-time employment opportunities 
. exist for such positions as Inventory con- 
trol, sales and marketing, administra- 
tion, entry level management, ware- 
housing and personnel development. 

'Training at Midwest Impulse Is pro- 
vided In hands-on and In-class fashion," 
said Rick Toplak, president of the com- 
pany. "We are a rapidly growing 
Import warehouse company that is 
able to offer tremendous savings to our 
customers. We distribute to small busi- 
ness and retail establishments." 

Toplak Is projecting a major expan- 
sion for his Prospect Heights based 
company In 1995 and Is looking to trafn 
and fill positions now to meet that 

'We are a large Import wholesale 
distribution company that has been 
going strong for 14 years," said Toplak. 
"We Import goods and manufacturing 



from all over the world. We believe that 
with our concepts, prices and mer- 
chandise we can become a household 
name within the next few years." 

Toplak prides himself on utilizing the 
"smart business" concept. "We deal 
directly with manufacturers to end con- 
sumers so we cut out the middle man 
and bring customers a lower price," 
Toplak said. 

By being their own middle man, 
Toplak predicts Midwest Impulse prices 
will continue to decrease as he contin- 
ues to build his buying power. 

"Right now our merchandise Is 70 - 75 
percent less than average retail," 
Toplak said. 

"We deal with approximately 5,000 
different types of merchandise from 
housewares, gift items, music, toys, 
electronics, small office supplies and 
novelties." 

Midwest Impulse has offices In 
Prospect Heights, Elk Grove Village, 
Downers Grove and ten other cities 
nation wide. 

For more information contact Toplak 
at 459-1192. 



Employment agencies assist workers, employers 



Based. on current trends In employ- 
ment, temporary positions may 
account for nearly 25 percent of the 
work force by the .year 2000. 

In Lake County, there are several 
agencies that assist clients In finding 
employment while providing services to 
their client company. 

Temporary positions often range for 
day placements to positions place- 
ments that encompass several months. 



Kelly, Manpower, Superior Personnel 
and Matthew are among Lake County 
companies offering employment plac- 
ing. 

• Positions are generally available In 
light manufacturing and clerical fields. 
Some agencies, however, to assist In 
the placement of professional positions 
as well. 

For more Information, contact one 
of the Lake County agencies. 




AVAILABLE 

Luxurious North Shore conference center 

seeking qualified people with experience in 

the hospitality industry. Excellent working 

environment. Good pay and benefits. 

Assistant Food & Beverage Director 

Dining Room P.M. Host 

Wait Staff 

Full & Part-time - A.M. & P.M. & Weekends 

Desk Clerks 

Full & Part-time - A.M. & P.M. & Weekends 
Night Auditor - Part-time 

Room Attendants - Part-time 

Please FAX resume or apply in person 24 hrs. a day 

M Harrison 

CONFERENCE CENTERS 

136 Green B ay Road 
Lake Bluff, IL 60044 
FAX: 708/295-9307 



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ScpTCKbM JO, 1994 UUlANd Newspapers EMPLOYMENT GUIDE 







1 

Employment « 
Opportunities ( 



Telephone Customer Service Representative - Assist our 

corporate gift customers. • 

Customer Service Clerks - Provide clerical support to customer 
service group. Requires office skills. 

We offer: 

•Seasonal, full time employment 
•Competitive pay 
•Exciting bonus plan 

For the Above Positions You need: 

•Customer Service/Sales experience or 
•General Office Experience 
•Excellent communication skills 

•Good math skills 
•Willingness to work overtime . 

Plant Openings 

INVENTORY CHECKER -- Requires excellent reasoning & computational 
skills; ability to operate a cherry picker or forklift; and attention to detail. 
Bilingual a plus. 

QUALITY CONTROL INSPECTOR IN RECEIVING - Requires accuracy & 
attention to detail. Bilingual a plus. 

SANITATION WORKER - Works from 3 to 1 1 :0 °. P m -- i des ^^ el f^^ e * |fc 



rience, such as food sanitation, janitorial, or housekeeping. Bilingual a 



plus. 

We would like to hear from you if you have related experience. If interest- |^ 
ed apply Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 13970 W. Laurel Drive. « 
Lake Forest, IL 60045 or call 708-362-0028. 



S 




i 

1 

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I 

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Marriott 



l 



I Marriott International, a world leader in | 
I the hospitality industry has immediate, P 

full-time openings at 



I 

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I 

1 

1 
1 

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1 

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HOW 

Lake County's newest 

SUPERSTORE 



J^g||jS 



is now accepting 
applicants for Full Time 

Sales Personnel 



l/ESte 



•Delivery Warehouse Personnel 

Experience preferred but net necessary. 

Apply in person please 

1428 Glen Flora Ave* 
Waukegan 




'.. !*' 



«*> 



I 
1 



Marriott's 
Lincolnshire Resort 

Kitchen desk 

Restaurant Housekeeping 
Part'timeTheater DataEntry Position 

If you are looking for a job that 
offers a flexible schedule, training and 
advancement opportunities, competitive I 
wages, and excellent benefits. I& 

Contact Chris Zarek 
(708) 634-01 00 ext. 6145 



*Crew Positions - All Shifts 

♦Customer Service Representatives - In-store 

McDonalds *Management 
" ,@ *New Lake Bluff Restaurant -All positions 

Salary commensurate with experience. 

For Crew Positions, pick up an application 

at your local McDonald's. Lake Bluff applicants, 

Customer Service & Management applicants 

please call: (708) 234-3478. 

Send resumes to McDonald's, 

Attn: Stephanie Garrity, 

1025 W. Everett Rd., Lake Forest, IL 60045. 

Now Hiring In: Highland Park, Highwood, 

North Chicago, Great Lakes, Park City, 

Waukegan, Gurnee, Lindenhurst and 

our new Lake Bluff restaurant. 




i^tiiia*. 




JOIN THE 

Crate&Barrel 

FOR THE FALL - 
CHRISTMAS SEASON! 

Crate and Barrel is looking for energetic, 

hard working people to work at our fast 

paced Catalogue Warehouse shipping orders 

to our customers. We need detail-oriented 

people with good organizational skills to pick 

and pack orders. This is a seasonal position 

starting immediately through December. 

FUN PLACE TO WORK! 

Terrific Employee Discount! 



Come in to complete an application. 

Crate&Barrel 

CATALOGUE 

~~ 31 1 GILMAN AVENUE 

WHEELING, IL 60090 






im^fm, fr^fc»j urva ^rifv*/***. I*» * ' " *■* 



i ! C*J «". 3 t!iw»-:>«"i*' 







1 EMPLOYMENT GUIDE UkelANd Newspapers Stpitwhtt 10, 1994 



•■■* 




\. .-> 



V. 




Join the 



•Eagle Team J 



i 



Eagle Country Market has exciting 
PART-TIME positions available for those 
who want to be an integral part of our 
supermarket teams! Current openings 
include: 



• Deli Clerks • Bakery Clerks 
Produce Clerks • Seafood Clerks 

• Bagging Clerks • Cashiers 

• Night Crew Stackers 



\-Wft\ 



fWH^TRTMARKET 



Please Apply at 
Your Local 
Eagle Store! 



Equal Opportunity Employer M/F 





NEED DOUGH? 
WE DELIVER! 



NOW HIRING: 

ANTIOCH (428 LAKE ST.) 838-3030 

(1) PART TIME DELIVERY: 10-15 hours per week. Must be available to start at 4 p.m. 

FOX LAKE (15 S. ROUTE 12) 587-4666 

(2) FULLTIME DELIVERY PERSONNEL Day and evenings positions available. Earn $10 
to $15 per hour delivering for the world's largest pizza delivery company. Flexible schedul- 
ing. Employee discount. Must have insurance and good running vehicle. Must be 18 or older. 

(5) PART TIME DEUVERY PERSONNEL: Evening positions available 10 to 20 hours 
per week. Earn $10 to $15 hour, flexible scheduling. Must be available at least one week- 
end night, have Insurance and good running vehicle. Must be 18 or older. 

(3) CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES: Evening positions available 10 to 15 
hours per week, competitive wage. Must be friendly, 16 or older, familiar with computers 
and like to talk on the phone. 

COME and JOIN the 
DOMINO'S PIZZA TEAM! 




ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 



If you are a skilled Administrative Assistant looking for a better 
opportunity.. .look to Zebra Technologies! 



Our tremendous expansion requires us to add ah Administrative Assistant 
who will provide support to the Director of Manufacturing and his staff. 
Position requires a strong sense of responsibility and the ability to deal 
discreetly with confidential information, and involves a variety of 
administrative, secretarial and word processing functions. This position 
is highly project oriented as opposed to the usual secretarial duties. 

The ideal candidate MUST HAVE A STRONG BACKGROUND IN 
WINDOWS AND EXCEL along with aproficiencyin personal computers, 
word processing, spreadsheets and PC based data base packages. Excellent 
organizational skills and reliable follow through plus superior oral/ 
written skills are required. 

If you possess the above qualifications and would like to work for a 
company which has been selected as one of Illinois' top 100 firms, don't 
hesitate to contact us. Selected applicant will receive a highly competitive 
compensation/benefits package in a SMOKE FREE environment. Please 
send your resume including salary history to: ZEBRA 
TECHNOLOGIES, Dept. AA, 333 Corporate Woods Parkway, 
Vernon Hills, IL 60061. 



M 



Equal Opportunity Employer M/F 



wy 




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- 






perior 




ersonnel 



Permanent and Temporary Personnel Specialists 




3F 



'Secretaries 

►Bookkeepers 

•A/PA/R 

•Telemarketing 

►Clerical 

•Customer Service ;> 



Receptionists 
Data Entry 
Payroll 
Banking 
File Clerks 
Word Processors 




•i i byjftima'i nut 
i ran I i rfl<j wort 
iiu'tafr, tjio ^rn 




perior JLersonnel 



"Your Total Personnel Solution" 

(708)244-0016 

Give us a try. You'll be glad you did! 



% 



$ 



o* 



fttRNITUftg 



^S 




$ Has Great Opportunities! 



WE NEED PEOPLE WHO: 

• Know what it means to give outstanding 
customer srvc. 

• Have an interest in fine upholstered furniture 

• Want to bring fun and enthusiasm to our party 

• Truly believe the customer always comes first 

WE OFFER: 

• $1666.67 starting Guaranteed Draw 

• The chance to make $40K per year 

• A great group of people to work with 

• A competitive benefits package 

• An outstanding employee discount policy 

• All the training you'll need to be successful with us. 

LA-Z-BOY Furniture Gallery, a LA-Z-BOY dealer, the 
premier upholstered furniture leader in the 
Chicago & suburban metro area (16 locations), has 
openings for Full Time sales. Only those interested 
in helping us make the LA-Z-BOY Furniture Gallery 
famous for customer service need apply. If you 
want to learn more about retail for a future career 
or would like to grow with us, we should talk. 



& 



Call 1-800-734-6434, Ext. 7 
9am -5pm, Monday-Friday 



■ 



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SfpTCMbut 30, 1994 LaIceM Newspapers CLASSIFIED 



■ 





Help Wanted 

FuU-Ttme 



220 



Help Wanted 

Fall -Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DRIVERS COME FOR 
THE MONEY, STAY FOR 
THE STABILITY. J.B. Hunt, 
one of America's largest and 
most successful transporta- 
tion companies, off or Its d riv- 
ers starting salaries In oxcoss 
of $2,000 monthly. Let us help 
you with your training.' Call: 1- 
800-368-8638 E.O.E. Subject 
to drug screen. 

DRIVERS GET ON the road 
to success hauling special 
commodities. Join the profes- 
sionals In our blanketwrap 
owner operator program. (The 
newest growing segment of 
the high value products divi- 
sion of North American Van 
Lines, Inc.). 78* per mile load- 
ed/empty plus accessorials. 
'Overall average ot.85« per 
mllo, *2,300 miles per week 
average/ 50% "+; drop and 
hook at origin. Sign- on bonus 
and tractor purchase plan 
available. Minimum of 3- . 
months tractor trailer driving 
experience required. 1-800- 
234-3112 Dept.BW-4. 

DRIVERS HOME TIME A 
PROBLEM? Come Join 
WVT's family. 1-yr. OTR ex- 
perience required for midwest - 
flatbed operation. For more In- 
formation call 1-800-759- 
3164. 

DRIVERS WANTED TO ■ 
RUN MIDWEST AND 
WEST COAST. New pay 

scale, late model equipment. 
Call Gary or Tim at G.F. La- 
Caeyse Transport. 1-800-645* 
3748. - , 

DRIVERS. OTR Co., team, 
O/O and driving schools 
grads. Excellent pay and ben- 
efits. Newer conventional. 
Pay based on experience. 
Regular home time. West Side 
. Transport. 1-800-373-2967, 
ext. 183. 

DRIVERS. OTR MILLIS Is 
adding '175 new trucks to Its 
fleet, and needs top drivers to 
1ID them. Top Pay. MBes, Ben- 
etlts. T-6d0r937 : 0flfl0; E.O£. • 

DHt VERS/O WNER OP- 

ERATORS. POOLE Truck 
Une has Immediate openings 
tor drivers and O/O. Drivers 
starling pay up to 
52.800/month with great bene- 
fits. Teams A & E runs avail-, 
able. Company sponsored 
training for those with ho ex- 
perience. O/O excellent pack- 
age van or flat.. Must be 23. 
For mora Information -call 1- 
800-553-9443. Dept BA-85. 

DRIVERS: Semi-drivers 

wanted for long and short 
hauls. Late model equipment. 
Top Pay. *Bonus Plan. "Excel- 
lent Benefits. Contact Carol 
Benett ay 1-800-373-3142 lor 
more Intormallon. - 

ELECTROLUX 

SALES/SERVICE help need- 
ed. Call 1-800-891-8345. 



LICENSED LIFE & HEALTH 
AGENT NEEDED. Quality pro- 
ducts, high comissions with 
advance before Issue, lead 
system and benefits. (Must 
quality lor advances & bene- 
fits) Call: 1-800-252-2581. 

NEED YOUNG MAN WITH 
CARPET REPAIR EXPERI- 
ENCE, for International fran- 
chise cleaning company. Pride 
In workmanship a must. (708) 

940-0300, 



CLEANING 
CREWS NEEDED 

Full or Part Time 
positions available 

Call Quality Cleaning 

(708) 587-2766 



^fimmmiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiHiiiiiiU: 

DRIVERS OTR 

SiNqtes & teams - 
| nEpuincd. Must Iiave | 
1 CIass A CDL Hazmat. | 
I VERN 

8(708) 526 mm 

■liimiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiirl. 



CLERICAL 

Immediate Start: 

General ofc/word processing. 

Typing 40-50 wpm. 

8:30a - 4:00p,1tfon.-Fri. 

Bannockbum area. 

$7.00 hr. + increases. 

Call Help Unique 
•, for interview 

708-215-9300 



CHILDREN BACK 
TO SCHOOL? 

We have flexible-hour 
career opportunities as* a 
WELCOME WAGON* 
Representative which will 
fit nicely Into your schedule. 
Provide useful information 
about local businesses and 

I the community to new par- 
ents, engaged women, new 
citizens and new neigh 
bors. To loam more, ask 
about our next training 
class. Car necessary.*- 30- 
40 hours par week. 
Call: Maria 577-3637 
Monday, October 3rd 
9 am to S pm 

WELCOME WAGON 1 

ANErGHBORHOOD TRADITION 
slnca 1928 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



Developmental 
Trainer 

Full time, entry level, 
willing to train, indi 
viduals with develop- 
mental disabilities, in 
skills, oral hygiene, 
domestic, pre-work 
and community. 

Contact 
Gail Becker 

(708) 438-5050 

Mount 
St. Joseph 

Lake Zurich 



'jt'miiTiiiiiimitMtnniii i mimtinii ""> 



RETAIL SALES 
ASSOCIATES 

Loath Furniture li Expanding 
Wa are eurmnty Intmtowlng tor 2 
aggressive sates osscdalw to work 
at our Qumoo loc. Applicants must 
bo sell motivated, possess good 
communication eWlls and have a sin- 
cere desire to succeed. We oiler 
exc, incentive benefits and an Inten- 
sive training program. Please call 
store manager at 336-3800. 



1 RESTAURANT MANAGER 

We are looking for a take-charge manager with 
experience In all phases of fine dining operations. 

Please call BUI or Gits 1 Oam to 8pm 

Country* Squire Restaurant 

Rti. 120 & 45 
Grayalake 

(708)223-0121 

Receptionist/Data Entry 

Wc have an entry level position for a receptionist/ 
data entry person. The ideal candidates will have a 

pleasant phone manner and personality to answer 

phones, great customer and do daily data entry and 

some filing. Apply in person at: 

Nu-Way Speaker Products, Inc. 
. 945 Anita Ave., Antioch, IL 60002 

EOE 



DRIVERS 

Local company seeks drivers i 
for tltclr over Ihe road/local i 
division. Reefer experience' 
helpful, excellent driving 
] record a must. CDL license, 
required, excellent pay plus, 
benefits. Apply at 

'BlRQIWOOD TRANSPORT 

3111 152nd Ave. 

Kenosha, WI 

Mon-Fri Sam - 4pm 

or call Mike 
(414) 859-3018 

EOE ■ 



Established firm 

has opening for an 

Entry Level 

SALES 
POSITION 

Individual will be resp. for 
marketing manufactured 
housing In Southeastern 
Wisconsin. Highly motivat- 
ed person will be rewarded 
with high volume sales 
capability. Real estate 
license .is not required, 
Forward resume to: 

Sales Manager 

P.O. Box 17305 

Milwaukee, WI 53217 



SrJSj&T 






Drivara ccx 

CON-WAY. 

CENTRAL 

EXPRESS 

Accepting 
Applications 

•'•- FromQuallfied 
• Truck Drivers 
NOW! 
Join our Team and Enjoy: 

•New Company Owned 
. Equipment 

•Starting Pay $12.80Air. 

-Top Rate $17.55/hr. 

■Pull Benefits Package 

Including Prolit-Sharing 

{(or regular employees) 

•No Layovers • 

Home Every Day 

•Employment With the 

Premier Overnight LTL 

Market Leader 

•MEDICAL BENEFITS - 

AFTER 90 DAYS 
CCX Con-Way Central Express 
requires: minimum 1 year verifiable 
tractor trailer experience: CDL 
Endorsements (H or X and T); D.OT. 
physical; drug screen. Apply at: 

CCX Con-Way 

Central Express 

957 Tower Road 

Mundelein, IL 60060 

CCX Is an 

equal opportunity employer 






220 



Belp Wanted 
Fall-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 





t 


220 


Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fuil-Tlme 




COUNSELOR 

Adolescent 
Substance Abuse 

School-based program seeking 
counselor for high school set 
ting. Requires knowledge of 
adolescents and chemical 
dependency (IA0DAPCA cert 
preferred), and experience In 
adolescent dynamics and Indi- 
vidual, group and family coun 
sellng. Bachelor's degree 
required. Send resume to: 
Human Resources, Lake 
County Health Department, 
301 Grand Avenue, Waukegan, 
IL 60085. Smoke-Free. EOE 



ADMnmvE 1 

ASSISTANT 

The South Lake County office 
of the Northern Illinois 
Council on Alcoholism and 
Substance Abuse has an entry 
level position for an Individ- 
ual with strong organizational 
skills, efficient administrative 
skills, good communication 
skills and a flare Tor details. 
You will Interact with clients 
in reception and appointment 
taking. Other duties Include 
word processing, typing, fil- 
ing, light bookkeeping and 
copy work.' Please contact: 

Ellen Sorensen 

2900 Main Street 

Prairie View, IL 60069 

1 (708)634-6422 ^ 



** Banking ~~ E 

Banking 
Associate 

Fast growing Banking 
organization Is seeking a 
banking associate to work 
in a friendly and profes- 
sional environment We 
seek a self motivated indi- 
vidual positive attitude 
who is dedicated to excep- 
tional customer service. 
Various duties Include 
account openings, cus- 
tomer service and loan 
documentation. Previous 
experience Is a plus. Good 
benefits and pay. Please 
send resume to 

American 

Chartered Bank 

of Lake Zurich 

459 S. Rand Rd. . 
•j Lake Zurich, IL 60047,- 



Vj iniiiriiHiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniHHiuiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiHtMiUHniiTiiiiiiriHiiiii i. 



\M (OOOTV'S IfflDIDO PHOTOttflPHV STUMO 

of IS years it seeking an energetic, responsible . 

person to assist in customer sates and service. If you 

are a people person looking for a good job with good 

benefits, call Ross at 708-223-4448. 



,t iiuMiiiinr umimimh immiiniHi mutumiii Hiiimimimuir, 



..1 



ADVERTISING SALES 



;'\'*-i;'-- 



Lakeland Newspapers, Lake Counr/s largest weekly 
newspaper group, is seeking an Advertising Account 
Executive. The cancWate will be respoosfcte for field 
sales calls, developing a key area in Lake County 
and must possess excellent skills in interpersonal 
communication, creativity and personal responsibility . 
The candid ate must also be serf motivated and able 
to work with minimal amount of supervision, enjoy 
variety and be able to harxte multiple tasks. An auto- 
mobile is necessary (gas compensation will be 
mads.) If you are professionaJ, energetic and pos- 
sess si of the above characteristics we are interest- 
ed in taking to you. A candidate should have previ- 
ous sates experience. Please send resume or call: 

Jill DePasquale 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(708) 223-8161 



=5* 



POLICE TELECOMMUNICATOR 

Opportunities are available for a career-minded, dependable, self-confident 
individual to join the professional telecommunications staff of the Mundelein 
Police Department. The police department communications center receives 
and dispatches all police, fire and emergency ambulance calls for a popu- 
lation of 23,700. Duties involve the operation of the E-911 Emergency 
System and a sophisticated radio and telephone network. 

Applicants must meet the following requirements: education and experi- 
ence equivalent to a high school degree, the ability to speak clear and artic- 
ulate English (Spanish desirable), a full range of hearing in both ears, and 
type accurately. Applicants must also have the desire and ability to work 
rotating shifts, including weekends and holidays. Desirable qualifications: 
previous experience with multi-line telephone equipment, on-line CRT data 
entry, or fast paced customer service. 

Starting salary $23,752.49 annually with advancement potential to 
$29,693.53 plus complete fringe benefits package. Applicants must pass a 
key-stroke/typing test, oral interview and an extensive background investi- 
gation. Applications can be obtained at the 

Mundelein Police Department 

200 North Seymour Avenue 

Mundelein, IL 60060 

starting Wednesday, September 28, 1994 through Friday, October 7, 1994. 
Completed applications must be returned to the Mundelein Police 
Department no later than 5:00 PM October 7, 1994. The Village of 
Mundelein Is an equal opportunity employer. 



I 



Telephone Reception 
InBarrington 

Motor Werta at Barrlngton Is 
looking for a selt-motivaled 
person for our active reception 
desk weekday evenings. Clear) 
work environment with room 
for advancement. 2 wk. vaca- 
tion and profit sharing plan. 
Apply In person 9a-9p at main 
entrance reception, Mon.-f ri. 

Motor Werks 

Berrlngton & Dundee Rds. 
Barrlngton, IL 



I Bobcat Owner! 
Operators 

needed for snowpl owing 

Top Pay - Paid Fuel 

Guar, hours. 

Work today - 
pay tomorrow 

(708)272-1886- 



BANK ON THIS!! 

Teller Trainees - 1 yr. Cash Handling 

Top Pay & Benefits 

244-0016 



perior JCcrsonnei 






PRIOR-SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES 

Need a Part-time job? The Illinois Army National 
Guard needs your skills and experience. You could 
qualify for: Great part-time Pay, Retirement Points, 

Leadership training, education and many other 

benefits worth checking out. Immediate openings. 

For more information call your local recruiter or 

1-800-OK-GUARD 



Illinois 



Americans At Their Best 




NATIONAL 

GUARD 



• 



NOW 



BURGER 

KING FULL & 

* PART TIME 

MOTHERS HOURS AVAILABLE 

Premium pay offered, 
paid vacations, flexible hours. 

Call 708-395-8806 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 

Q: Dear. ..Search: Let me start by saying I read your column 
each week arid thank you for your interviewing tips. I find 
comfort in the fact there are other people out there with the 
same concerns and problems when going through the inter- 
viewing process. 1 have been one of (hose individuals recent- 
ly faced with unemployment after 12 years with the same 
company. I landed my first interview last week and felt very 
comfortable with the knowledge that I have retained from 
your weekly information. I am quite proud to say that I land- 
ed the position and while although I know I did it on my 
own, I know you were a good influence. Thank you again 
and keep up the good work. C.S. - Grayslake. 

A: Dear C.S. Thank you. You made my day. 

9: Dear.. .Search: I was on my way to an interview for an 
outside sales position when I made the unfortunate mistake 
of stopping for a cup of coffee. A few miles down the road, 
I found myself wearing a quarter of the cup on my shirt and 
tie. With no time to spare to run home and change I actually 
thought of blowing off the interview. Something inside me 
said don't. I looked like a mess, I was very uncomfortable 
and only blocks away from what was to be an important 
interview for me. My instincts said if I didn't go now, there 
may be no second chance, so go for it! 1 did. And so it was 
that I walked in and immediately apologized to the employ- 
er for my appearance explaining what had happened. The 
employer just started to laugh and then began his story of 
how he was giving a lecture recently when he went to take a 
drink of water and the glass slipped out of his hands drench- 
ing his pants white he stood before a room full of people. 
There we were (he employer and myself laughing about this 
for five minutes. This broke the tension. I have just celebrat- 
ed my one year anniversary and over lunch with my boss we 
reminisced about the day 1 walked in. "You had guts," he 
said. 'You reminded me of me." I look back now and say to 
myself how glad I am that I took the step that day instead of 
turning my car around because I was embarrassed. I don't 
know if you would have recommended what I did, but it sure 
worked for me. Les - Vernon Hills 

A: Dear Les. ..Had you not taken that chance, you may never 
have known... Good for you. 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professional 
and President of Superior Personnel in Gumec. 
Letters can be sent to Nancy at 5 101 Washington St., 
Gumee.IL 60031. ■ • 



' 




CLASSIFIED {jMm*A Newspapers SipTCMbc* JO, 1 994 



T 






• i. 




220 



fidpWwtcd 
Full-Time 



220 



Hdp Wanted 
Fall-Time 



220 



Help Wanted I 
Fntl-Timc 



220 



Help Wanted 

FuU-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Timc 



THUCK UMiVhHS UHlVb 
TO OWNlt SO Down or com* 
pany Drivers. Here's our now 
program, 78* all mllosl Trao* 
tor ownerahlp/30-42 monlhsl 
*Averago 10,000+ 
mites/month. 'Company Iraln- 
Jng program (or sludonts avail- 
able. New Applo Unes Inc. 1- 
300-843-8308/1800-843- 
3384. Madison. SD. 

WE ARE SEEKING Ono mo- 
tivated self-starter to help 
schools and non-profit groups 
raise lunds as you enrich the 
lives ol your communities 
youth. Groat commissions. 
Call 1-800-966-8704 (or Infor- 
mation. 

WORK FULL-TIME, EARN 
GREAT MONEY (AVER- 
AGE S22 PER HOUR), 
SET YOUR OWN HOURS 
AND HAVE FUN! Join Wick- 
er PIU3, Ltd - Call Lynn 
/7naV497-3903 for dotails 



| MECHANIC | 

= Diesel & Gas - == 
1(708)526-08581 



Mundelein marketing 

company is looking 

for a full time 

Receptionist/ 

Executive Assistant 

Applicant must be person- 
able, organized, type 55 
wpm and be proficient in 
Word Perfect. Qualified 
applicants only. 
Apply in Person 

American 
Marketing Services 

955 Campus Dr. 

Mundelein 



Computer 

PRODUCTION 

MANAGEMENT 

United Malting Is sook/ng a man- 
ager for our personalization area, 
Experience vWlasor A Impact print 
production feq'd. Embossing & 
Ink-jet experience helpful. 
Opportunities for addfl responsibil- 
ities avail, for the right candidate. 
Successful track record supervis- 
ing a production staff req'd, Comp. 
salAons pkg. Quality Corporate 
chlkfcara avail. Please submit a 
resume Incl'dg salary history & 
roqm'ts to: David A. Tabort: UNIT- 
ED MAILING, INC., 1001 Park 
1Rd„ Chanhassen, MN 55317. 
EEO/AA Employer M/F/D/V. 



mam 

•PSYCHIATRIST* 

BoanJ Biij/cea child or adull psychiatrist. 
kVOutpa'jenl rati avail, Flo riot Lc. req'd. 
Apaiacheo Canlw lor Human Sorvicei. 
Inc.. Il a pVL noi-proli! healthcare organi- 
zation, onsflpg a lull nngo ol mental 
haalili, alcohol & drug abuia mm. 
JCAHO •cenxttad. Comp. ulJpui sue 
bans. Sand CV to: HR. Dlr„ A.C.H.B., 
INC., Pl.O. Box 1782, TailahassM, FL 
32303. E.O.EJDrua. Free Worttpiace. 



Medical 

PHYSICAL THERAPIST 

For Industrial rehabilitation program. 
Work hardening, work conditioning, 
job analysis, functional capacity 
evate, multi disciplinary approach. 
Exc. sal., comp. bens., continuing 
ed. oppty's A more. Call or send 
resume to: Jean Gipson, Mgr„ OMC 
PHYSICAL REHABILITATION. (602) 
256-22B1. Fax: (602) 256-6109. 



220 



Help Wanted, 

FuU-Tlme 



ANDRE'S 

STEAK HOUSE 

• Dining room wait staff 
•Banquet wait staff 
•Cooks 

• Pantry 

Please Call 
(815) 678-2671 



Drivers 

SPOTTER/DRIVER! 

Gurnee Area Loc. 

On site Tankwash driver 
position. Prefer to have 
CDL, Hazmat & Tank 
Endorsement. Full-time 
permanent position, flexible 
hrs. Exc. hourly rate, com 
party benefits. Call for appt. 
708*594-2200 ext. 314. 



FLOOR COVERING 
INSTALLERS 

Interested In Irving In COLORADO? 
Denver's leading new home resi- 
dential design center Is searching 
for QUALITY carpet, ceramic tile & 
vinyl mechanics. As Denver's lead- 
ing residential design center, we 
have plenty of work In new residen- 
tial Installations. If you are willing to 
Uvo In the finest area of the country 
& desire enough work to earn 
$ 1 0OO-S2OOO per week, we want (o 
hoar from youl Please send a 
cover letter with your qualifications, 
references & the best time to con; 
tact you by telephone to: Attn: Rick 
Uebondorfer, FLOORING INSTAL- 
LATIONS, INC.. 3770 Paris SL, 
Denver, CO B0239. 



TELLER 

We are wtking an erpeittncd 
Idler for a full time position Mon.- 
Fti. 10am to 7pm. tf you have a 
friendly smile and enjoy servicing 
customer*, please call (708) 
549-5831 cit. 510 24 hour? a 
day seven days a wek for an auto- 
matic telephone application . 

LibertyvMe Bank 

Branch of Richmond Bank 

1509 N. Milwaukee 

LibertyvMe, IL 60048 

BOB 



bnowpww 
Owner Operators 

NorthshorcArca 
Top Pay * Guar. Hours 

Work today - 
pay tomorrow 

(708) 272-1747 



ITsobstitoteI i printing 



TEACHERS 

Grades K- 12 

Wauconda 

School District 

S60/day 

after 1 days 

Call 708/526-7690 

M for application ■ 



1! 



ASSISTANT TEACHERS 
Full Time Early Childhood 

Assistant Teachers 

Qualifications: 19 years of age or 

older and high school diploma or GED 

Benefits Full Time Benefits Include 

•Pa/d Sick '1101% and •Vacation 

Da)^ 'Full Medial and 'Dental 

Insurance ■Retirement Program 

•YMCAMonbeBoip 
Salary commensurate with 
experience and education 

Apply in Person 

YMCA Chlldcarc and 

Learning Center 

706 E. Ilawley St 

Mundelein, IL 

(708) 949-0060 

1 Cindy Shcppard/Dlrcctor 1 






GRAPHIC 
DESIGNER 

Dynamic and fast- 
paced opportunity with 
the world's largest Inde- 
pendent picture frame 
manufacturer. Work In 
graphics areas 
including packaging, 
displays and promo- 
tional literature for 
mass market. Quark 
proficiency essential, 
conventional produc- 
tion skills a plus. 1-2 
years experience pre- 
ferred. Send resume 
and salary requirements 
in confidence to: 

Jim Scheyer 

Decorel, Inc. 

444 E. Courtland St. 
Mundelein. IL 60060 



Agape 

Chiropractic 

Center 

Doctors office in Like Villa 
looking for responsible per- 
son tor various duties 
inducting answering phones, 
greeting patients, and sched- 
uling appointments. Hours 
are Monday, Wednesday and 
Friday from 8:30 a.m. til 
7:00 p.m. Tuesdays and 
Thursdays from 12:00 p.m. 
ill 7:00 p.m. 

Please Call 

(708) 356-8093 

Ask for Karen 



1 FOOD PRODUCTION 

THE LAMBS FARM 

DO YOU like to cook? 
Enjoy working with people? 

THEN COME to work In the 
production area, helping to 
make jams, Jellies and salsa! 

YOU MUST be detail-mind 
ed with the ability to follow 
recipes and monitor conslsten 
cy and quality of product. 
Additional duties Include super 
vision of developmentatiy dis 
abled adults. 

WILL TRAIN QUALIFIED 
CANDIDATE! 

APPLY In person; THE 
LAMBS FARM, Jet 1-94 & Rte. 
176, Ubertyville, IL 60048 
(a.o.e.) 



J 'Experienced Pressman B 

■ for.FLEXOWEB 

JJ labels, l/Clo5/C u 

2 •Pressman * 

■ HEIDl/CSM offset ■ 

■ ■ 

■ »Hol Stamping ■ 

■ Role to role labels 

■ ■ 

■ FT/FT person needed to do * 

miscellaneous job duties m 

2 Island Lake I 
■(708)541-1400" 



HOMEMAKERS, 

TRAINEES, STUDENTS 

& OTHERS 

Do you enjoy helping the dis- 
abled Senior Citizens, etc? 
No experience required. Free 
Iralnfng program! General 
homsmaklng skills are 
required along with a caring 
attitude. Trainees wilt work 
with our clients In their local 
area. We offer: Great Pay, 
Bonuses & Pay Raises. You 
must have a car with Insur- 
ance. Please call for an 
Immediato Interview. 
NATIONAL 
HOME SYSTEMS 
Lake County cmll fricla 
708-336-2885 



SALES OPPORTUNITY 

AFLAC is the world leader in its field. Chicago li its fastest growing market. 



LET'S SUPPOSE 

• You we offered a lifetime career opportunity whh REAL jobiectirity. 

• You could scft a product 10 wanted ind needed that even if you have no prior »lea 
eaperience you can earn a high income after a tbort tramint; program. 

• You were able to wc the proven flnlerlei of uili Fortune 500. NYSE company to 
flow your buiincu wtlh little or no competition. 

• You could Mm m unlimited Income with commtotana, lifetime monthly renewal*, 
atock bootu tod Iwtntl ra. 

Now ask yourself.. 

Is this (he kind of career I'm looting for? 
Show thai you have the energy, ambition, ami entrepreneurial spirit to seize this 
high income and growth opportunity. Call Maggie or Liz at 70eV3S9-7993 or 
send resume to: 

AFLAC 

1700 Rand Road • Suite 100 • Palatine, IL 60074 



FIELD SUPERVISOR 

Skilled technical work in the operation of sewer collection 
systems and pumping stations and maintenance. Valid IL 
Drivers License required. $10-515 per hour depending on 
experience. 

Electrical and mechanical experience necessary. 

LAKES REGION SANITARY DISTRICT 

25380 W. Main Street 
Ingles id e, IL 60041 

708-546-7997 



(production supervisor* 

S lnd Shift i 

I We have an Immediate opening for a hands-on % 
J production supervisor. Mechanical aptitude required, I 






as well as the ability to lead and direct people. 

Bilingual In Spanish Is a plus. Send resumes to: 

BOX XX 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 

Gray slake, IL 60030 ' 



! 



TEAM DRIVERS 

HOME EVERY WEEK - DEDICATED RUN 

Competitive Pay w/Weekiy Pay Late Model Conventionals 



Load/Unload & Stop Pay 
Vacation/Health Insurance 
We Require; 

Verifiable OTR Experience 
Good Driving Record 



Assigned Trades 



Drug Screen 

Meet DOT Requirements 



For Interview call Art or Steve at 
1-815-224-2223 or 1-800-228-4291 



cgetic, self-starters & team players! 



BBBnnBHHnBBOBHHHBBBnannBanBnHBBraBa 

1 GENERAL 1 
1 FACTORY | 

c Transformer mfgr. needs men & women for assembly,!! 
J] Inspection, and packing assignments. We need ener-[| 

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•4 Day - 40 Hour Work Week, Mon.-Thurs. 
•Life, Health & Dental Benefits 
•401 K Retirement Plan 
•Paid Vacation & Holidays 

Apply In Person To: 

ACTOWN ELECIROCOIL 

2414 Hlghview St. Spring Grove, IL 60081 
(815)675-6641 



SEARS PORTRAIT STUDIO 
FULL AND PART TIME CHRISTMAS HELP WANTED 

Here's your opportunity to work with one of the .most national- 
ly recognized companies in the photography industry. Sears 
Portrait., Studios are operated under license by CPI Corporation 
in over 900 locations. 

If you are creative, outgoing, talented with children and enjoy 
seeing the direct result of your work, this may be the job for 
you. Photography experience is not necessary. Ability to work 
with the public a must. Any previous experience in retail sales 
is preferred. 

Hours may include evenings and weekends. 

We provide a fully paid training program, competitive compen- 
sation, and outstanding opportunities for career advancement 
Put yourself in our picture! Salary commensurate with retail 
sales experience. 

APPLY IN PERSON TUE-SAT 1 0-6 

HAWTHORNE CENTER 

E.O.E. M/F 



Med 



Medical Opportunities - - 

PUBLIC HEALTH 
NURSE 

Program Expansion 

LCHD Maternal Child Health 
Programs expanded ■ need 
BSNs! Recent experience In 03- 
GYN and/or Pads desirable. 
Bilingual a plus. Send resume to 
Human Resources, Lake County 
Health Department, 3010 Grand 
Avenue. Waukegan, IL 60085. 
Smoke-Frao. EOE 



PHYSICAL THERAPIST 

West Central Georjrja 
Orthopedic Group Practice 

Salary (o$70K per Yr 
PLUS BONUS-Add'UOIK, 
CPE Allowance, Health, Dental, 
Life & Disability leu, k 
Vacation Flrj_RELOCATION BONUS. 
3 yrs. tnln. exp, proficient in EMG & 
NCV Testing and Interpretation 
with Certification txp, U knowledge 
In AM A ratings. Working knowl- 
edge of computers helpful. State-of- 
the-art facility. Mon-rrl work wk. 
Days Only. Convenient to Atlanta & 
the Gulf Beaches. For more Informa- 
tion call Shirley A. Gaus. 
Administrator 1-600-864- 1401. 

Columbus Health 
Management Services, Inc. 
P.O. Drawer 9456 
Columbus, GA 31908 . 



?£ 



NURSE/MEDICAL ASST./RECEPTIONIST 

Variety or duties to include: light typing. Tiling, schedule 

appt. Computer skills and assisting with patients. 

Round Lake Beach and Mundelein offices. 

Must be able to work Saturdays. 

(708)546-0580 



« 



3 



M«jicaJ 

♦RADIOLOGY* 

Ult/atound lech, wa'niad lor FT po jltton 
lor Kinm outpali«nl Imaging can1ar. 
No wfcendt or callr Mutt be rog'd. 
OB/QYN 1 Abdomal Scanning. Vaicuiar 
e»p. a plus, tic. bent. Wltlng lo work 
dltgnoiUc/or mammography. II in la rail- 
ed, ploasa mail of raj rowmo lo: JOHN- 
SON COUNTY IMAGING, I2O0O W. 
HOih SI.. Sla. »500. Overland, KS 
86210. Fax: 913-469-5695, 



THE WINNING TEAM 

J YOU 
r AND THE 
'CLASSIFIEDS 
'GET YOU 
I WHERE YOU 
'WANT TO GO 




YOU ALWAYS HIT 
THE MARK WITH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 



r . 



Drivers . 

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST 

HILLSIDE REHABILITATION 
HOSPITAL SoCd In Warren, OH 
fjust t 1ffi hrs. from Pittsburgh), 
has positions avail," for 
Occupational Therapists. Hillside 
offers generous bens. Incl'dg our 
newly structured pay scale, 
numerous educational oppt/s & 
feloc. assls". Hllskle treats head 
injury, stroke, spinal cord injury, 
musculoskeletal & neurological 
disorders. Applicants must be 
licVellg. in the state of Ohio. For 
mors Info, call or wbrnlt a resume 
In confidence to: Dopt. ol 
Occupational Therapy, HILLSIDE 
HOSPITAL, 8747 Squires Lane 
N.E., Warren, OH 44484. 

(216) 841-3887 Of (216) 841-3890 



\ Make A Career 
Out Of Caring 

Earn a Certified Nursing 
Asst. Certification while 
you learn & grow in a very 
rewarding field. 

Hiikmt Nursing 

'■ 'ill font 

CENm 

will help set your course. 

Come visit Hillcrest 

for infommtion on 

ourprogram. 

1740 N. Circuit Dr. 

Round Lake Beach 60073 



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■BBBBBBBBBBH 



MOUNT SAINT JOSEPH 




DIRECT 
CARE 



NIGHT 
SHIFT 



\hi-l 



^=^1 



THE RESIDENT IS 

AT THE HEART OF 

ALL WE DO! 



Immediate 
openings for 

Direct 
v. Care 
1 Workers 

Pull or 
Part Time. 

Willing to 

train for 

positions. 

Wlmusm contact Gull Becker 

(708) 438-5050 



RN/LPN 

Full Time Opening 

2pm - 10pm 

Including Saturdays 

Contact 

Candy Sabay 




Medical 

YOU DON'T KNOW US, 

BUT WE KNOW YOUIH 

We're GROUSE IRVING MEMOR- 
IAL, central New York's largest 
acute-care hospital. You're a dedi- 
cated RN w/solid critical or acute 
cam oxper., looking for a change & 
the chance to live In a scenic, fam- 
ily-oriented community. CROUSE 
IRVING MEMORIAL OFFERS... 

* A solid compensation package 

* Shift Differentials up lo 30%. 
' Tuition Reimbursement 

' Extensive Inservlcos oducatJofV 
orkmtat'onprog. 

* Moving Expenses (Up to 52,000.00} 

SYRACUSE A CENTRAL NEW 
YORK OFFER... 

* One of tno best cost-of-living 
standards In the Northeast. 

' Acclaimed school systems & year- 
round sports. Including Big East 
Conference ball. 

* Hlghfy-AHmdable Housing. 

Get to know us belter. We have 
Immediate openings In our 'ED, 
PCU, ICU, CCU & LAD areas. Call 
collect, (315) 470-7523 & ask for 
Vicky Loratto, RN. or Mall/Fax 
resume to (315) 470-7232. Either 
way, we look forward lo hearing 
from you soon. 

CROUSE IRVING 
MEMORIAL 

736 Irving Ave. ' 
Syracuse, NY 13210 

An EOE/AAE Employer 



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Market GuidE 



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Household Goods 
Fumituro 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



EASY CHAIR, SOFA and 

Lovosoat, Bluo, Mauvo, 
Croam, S550. LEATHER 
sofa and lovosoal, 3050. Ex- 
collonl condition, MUST SELLI 

(708)540-1046, 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bod- 
room, complole $1,100. Din- 
ing room set, $1,700. OAK 
bedroom set $1,200, Oak 
dlnlngroom sot" $1,000. 
ALSO Slokjh bedroom sol, 
$1,745. All In PERFECT con- 
dition. MUST SELL) 
(708)543-1045. 

BEATIFUL WALNUT 01- 
NINGROOM SET, table 
55x37, extends to 90x37, 
stained and heat proof sur- 
face, G-chalrs. all In excellent 
condition, SB50/best. (703) 
438-8789. 

CONOVER GRAND PIA- 
NO, IMngroom set wtlh end ta- 
bles, queen size waterbed, In- 
cludes both dressers with mir- 
ror and nlghi stand. All negoti- 
able. (708)662-1510. 

COUCH, LOVESEAT, 

ROCKER, chair, coffee table, 
end table. Country stylo, $150. 
(708) 497-^1135 after 4pm. 



HUTCH AND KITCHEN 
TABLE, oak. $500A>est. (708) 
740-2014 ask for Mark. 

JACUZZI-VITA SPA, 6- 
soal, usod less than lyr. Will 
deliver within roason. 
$3,700rtlrm. (708) 548-8621 
Grayslake. 

KING SIZE WATERBED 
llrm seml-wavoless mattress 
with conlor support. Head 
board with shelves and mirror, 
6-drawer baso. $400. (708) 
265-1799. 

KINGSIZE WATERBED, 6- 
drawer pedestal. Mirror, 
shotve3 and cabinet In head- 
board. $250/best. (708) 
546-0248. 

MATTRESS SETS, ANY 
size, never usod, retail, 5500- 
$1,100. Sacrifice: $135- 
$295. (708) 913-8965. 

,SOFA, EXCELLENT CON- 
DITION. Foyer table wtlh mir- 
ror. (815) 385-0784 after 6pm. 



344 



Jewelry 



LEFT ME AT THE ALTAR. 

Must sell engagement ring, 
$3,200/best. (414) 862-9463 
after 4pm. 



V 
¥ 




¥ 
¥ 
¥ 

¥ 



¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



Daybreak Farms 

5660 Shadow Brook Ct. 

(Rt. 137 to River Rd. (before Milwaukee Rd) 

N-2 mi lei to Daybreak Far me - Follow ilgns) ¥ 

Fri. & Sat. Sept. 30 & Oct. 1 ¥ 

9:30-3:30, Numbers 8:30 ¥ 

¥FABULOUB SALE) ENTIRE CONTENTS OP HOME PJCL. ALL¥ 
M FIXTURES. APPLIANCES AND TOP QUALITY CONTEMPO--- 
▼ raRY FURNITURE. LIVTNQ ROOM: Sect. Sofa by Thaycr¥ 
•.Coegtn. Occ. Table, Pr. Fr. Uph. Chairs, Sofa. Table. Wonderful^' 

Lighted Gtass/Chrome Elegere Shelf. PAMILT ROOM: 4 pc.T, 
^Modular Sofa. Class/Brass/Chrome Tables. PORCH: V 
^Handmade Twig Furn. KITCHEN: Side by Side RcfriCM 
^Dishwasher, Ovens. Microwave, Kll. Table fit Chairs. MASTER^ 
^BEDROOM: Thomasvllle KJng BR Set. Leather Recilner.t. 

BEDROOM: Teak BR Set & Lane BR Set. OFFICE: $4,000^ 
▼Xerox Mach. Like New. Computer Equip.. Lateral Flies. Chairs, ¥ 
MDesk. LOWER LEVEL: Olhausen Fool Table. Bally Pin BallM 
^Mach., Sofn fit Loveseat, Wide Screen TV. OARAGE: Murray^ 
^Riding Mower. Workbench. MISC: Several OUs, Tracker Premier tf 

— System 70 Satellite Receiver. Outdoor Jaciuzl. Custom Marie 

▼Rugs. Lamps, Color TVs fie VCR's...MOREl ¥ 

¥ EVERYTHING IN HOME LIKE NEW! ¥ 

¥ LORD & NOBLE ESTATE SALES ¥ 

¥ 708/615-0249 ¥ 






S30 


Firewood 



S54 


Moving/Storage 



FANTASTIC 
FIREWOOD 

[2 yr. old Seasoned Hardwood. 

Oak, Maple, Ash, Cherry. 

$59.00 per face Cord. 

{1/3 of full Cord) 

Free Stacking & Delivery. 

"Buy the wood that's 
guaranteed to burn" 

(708) 546-3613 



MOVING?? CALL BOB The 
Mover. Furniture; pianos; 
sates; restaurant equlpmenl; 
Light machinery. Lilt gate 
van and small crane 1 nicks. 
PACK' RAT Enterprises. 
(708)662-1956. 



** Recycle 



S93 


Trees/Plants 



WORK HARD ALL DAY? 
ARE YOU TIRED AT 
NIGHT? LET ME CLEAN 
YOUR HOUSE! I'LL 
TREAT IT AS MY OWN. 
TEN YEARS EXPERI- 
ENCE. VERY REASON- 
ABLE. EXCELLENT REF- 
ERENCESI(708) 
39S-6234 (ANYTIME). 



TREE & STUMP 
REMOVAL 

Land Clearing 
Seasoned Hardwood 

Nordstrom Three 
Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 

708-526-0858 



S42 



Landscaping 



S99 



Miscellaneous 
Services 



Firewi 




23 years In business 
• Mixed hardwoods $65.00 F.C. 

• Oak $70.00 F.C. 

» Cfwry • Birch • Hickory $80.00 F.C 

Discount on 2 or more. 

Credit Cards Accepted 

(708) 876-0111 



KARAOKE PARTIES. Com- 
plete mobile system. Includes 
operator/singer^! large selec- 
tion ol songs.v 2yrs. experi- 
ence. Competetlve pricing. 
Calf for details. (706) 
223-6362. 

PERMANENT COSMETICS. 

Brow, eye and Lip color. 
Beautiful Forever!. Electroly- 
sis By Sherry. 18* years ex- 
perl e nee -cert 11 led. Wauk*- 
otn, Lake Villa, Lake Bluff. 
(708)244-1640. 



350 


Miscellaneous 



(2) BIRD CAGES, 1-small 
wiili stand $40, 1-modlum 
$25. Excellent condition. (700) 
548-6142 loavo mossago. 

(4)-FlrQ9lone FTX tires, 
18,189.1 mllos, 235/00115; 
$120/Tlrm. Spare tiro unusod 
$50. fVOB) 587-6555. 

DJ EQUIPMENT, mixor 
board and slack, with Iroa 
lights on sland. (815) 
675-0434 ask tor Bill. 

EXTENSIVE FALL WAR- 
DROBE of mens and ladles 
clothing. Includes formal wear 
and furs. Must sell Immedlale- 

ly. (70B) 631-2428. 

INSULATION 4x8 sheets, 
foil back foam, factory sec- 
onds, easy to Install. Contact 
Ken Nichols, (217) 728-4217 
or 1-800-424-1250. 

OAK HIGHCHAIR/CLOTH 
CUStONS, $25. Inlanl/lod- 
dler rocking horse, $14. New 
down coat, sfzo medium, $20. 
Miscellaneous; humidifier, 
console, $30, crystal chandeli- 
er $40. Or best offers. (708) 
587-4062 9am-Bpm. 

POOL TABLE, BRUNS- 
WICK 4-1/2 x 9tt„ Gold Crown 
II, excellent condition, 
52,400/iIrm. Call Bob (414) 
653-0302. 

RAPID WEIGHT LOSS. 

'Specializing In difficult cases.' 
Known nationwide tor great re- 
sults. 'Guaranteed, 'Increas- 
es Metabolism, 'Boosts Ener- 
gy, 'Stops Hunger. Call United 
Pharmaceutical. Now Save 

20%. 1-800-733-3288. 

SUNQUEST WOLFF TAN- 
NING BEDS. New Commer- 
cial-Homo Units. From $199, 
lamps, lollons, accessories. 
Monthly payments tow as $18. 
Call today Freo New color cat- 
alog. 1-800-462-9197. 

Unfinished redwood table 
tops and bases. One price 
takes all. $300/best. (70S) 
57B-9418. 

WANT MORE PRIVACY77 
Do It Wllh TREES! No fence 
or permits necessary with our 
beautiful thick Blue Scotch 
Pines. We guarantee, deliv- 
er and plant for FREE with 
orders of 10 or/more trees. 
4II.-5H. $65/each; '511.-611. 
$85/each; 6ft.-7ft. 

3120/each. Larger trees also 
available. Nursery Grown. 
Thousands to choose from. 

(815) 338-3348. 

WATER CONDITIONER 

32,000 COMMANDER, 

electronic control system, 
used one time, $675. (708) 
740-7009. _^ 

WEDDING DRESS, size 10 
with room to take in or let out. 
Beautiful white long sleeved 
dress. Sequins and pearls on 
bodice, sleeves and on de- 
tailed train. Scalloped neckline 
and back. Look special on 
your wedding day. in the store 
this dress would be $1,200. 
Asking only $500. Call after 
5pm or teavo message. (708) 
973-0149. 



SPAS fie 
HOTTUBS 

Factory Direct Outlet. 

Always the low price. 

All colors, sizes 

& styles! 

Woodukd Pier I 

(414) 534-5264 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



(2) STAIR LIFTS, Incllnator 
Co. of America, seven track, 
liko new. Each $2,00OA>ost. 
(414) 877-2236. 



EEHT 



Musical Instruments 



ADAM SCHAAF GRAND 
PIANO, llgor mahogany cabi- 
net. Very good condition. 
$1,700.(414)604-3201. 

GOYA classic guitar wllh 
case, handmade,' no plywood, 
30+ years old, $475. (708) 
546-6803. 




360 


Pds& Supplies 



DOG BOAROING- 
Dependabto ADULTS will 
care lor your DOG or Puppy, 
In our home, . Fenced yard 
and loving care for your PET, 
while you vacation, or leave 
oh weekend trips. Have 
Many Excellent Referenc- 
es. (708) 966-6319, 
Florence, or leave message 
and date you anticipate 
boarding. . 

2-IGUANA'S (1) 3ft. long, (1) 
2tt. long, cage, hot rock, water 
dish. S300/best. (708) 
578-9418. 

BABY GERBILS FOR 
SALE, call (708) 336-3792. 

NEED A FRIEND? For sale 
English Springer Spaniels, 
bom 7/5/94, AKC registered. 
All girls! S250/ea. (414) 
537-2075. 

SHAREBOARDER WANT- 
ED. 5yr. old Thoroughbred 
Gelding, hunter/jumper type. 
Stabled In Wauconda. In- 
cJoor/outdoor ring. No begin- 
ners pleased Call Kelly 
(700)854-2266 Loavo Mes- 
sage 



364 



Res Liu rant 
Equipment 



ATTENTION RESTAU- 

RANT OWNERS! Stainless 
steel steam table, 5-wells, 
electric, on wheels, wllh cut- 
ling board. NSF approved. 
$350.(708)223-7451 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or Parte. 
Also JUKE BOXES, MUSIC 
BOXES, Nickelodeon and 
Coke Machines. Paying 
CASHI Call (708)985-2742. 



TONE 

Because we are focal, we 
lake the lime to get the 
whole story. 

Each week in your 
Lakeland Newspaper you 
can expect fine tuned 
coverage ol events thai 
affect you and your family 
in detail. 

Stay in tune wilti your 
Lakeland Newspapers, 
Sutecrfce today 

(708)3238101 



PETS IN NEED 

Needs Your Help! 

We have until October 4 to liquidate the 

animals we have, or they will be 

destroyed! 

Here is a sample of some of 

the animals we have available for adoption: 

Long and short haired cats and kittens, some 

dectawed, Siamese cats, 

German Shepherd, Long haired Dachshund, Lab-mix, 

Golden Retriever, Cairn Terrier, and many other 

small, 

medium and large dogs. 

Adopt from m shelter 

& receive your 

epay/neuter card. 

Be a responsible pet owner! 

(815)PAT-1462 

Pets In Need 



A 4 -bod room, 2-1/2 bath 
Wlldwood House. Largo 
deck overlooking Iho lake. 
Free pro-qualltylng tor mort- 
gago. $155,000. (708) 
549-9400. 

BARRINGTON- Northwest 
Hwy. 3-bodroom, 2-balh, on 
1/3acro. Appliances, central 
air, 2.5car garago. Energy offi- 
ciant. Rustic cedar shakos. 
Just roduced: 8 1 8 0,000 NOW 
Si 79 ,900. Contract, sale or 
rent/option possible. (708) 
526-8306. , 

BRICK RANCH ON 11 acr- 
es, 4yrs. old, great lor ani- 
mals. No Realtors. (708) 
395-1312. ' 

CRYSTAL LAKE Schools. 

DEAL DIRECT WITH BUILD- 
ERl 4-bedroom, 2-story, 2.5- 
baths, deck, energy efficient. 
River rights on wooded lot. 
DRY basement has potential. 
t l Q IiOOO $179,900. (708) 
526-8306. 

FOX LAKE- LARGE Deluxe 
Cedar/Brick 2-story wtlh Eng- 
lish base me nl on 1-acre*- 4- 
bedroom, 2.5bath. Jacuzzi, 
fireplace, 3-car garage. TOO 
MANY UPGRADES TO LISTI 
Ready to move-In. Contract 
Possblo. Financing available, 
la70i0 OO, Now 5269,900. 
DEAL DIRECT With 
BUILDER and SAVE. (70S) 
526-6306. 



You CAN own your own 
home! No downpaymenl on 
Mites materials, atlracllve 
construction financing. Call 
Miles Homes today. 1-800- 
343-2884 ext. 1 



HOME FOR SALE. 4-bed- 
room, * 2.5-baths. 
$327,000. Buill In 19B0 by 
Laziaroto Construction Com- 
pany. Booutllulfy detailed 
throughout. Professional land- 
scape, West Trails, Graystake. 
(700) 223-6032. 

JOHNSBURG NEARLY 1 
ACRE ON A CUL-DE-SAC. 

3 bedroom Ranch with full 
basement, 2.5 car garage, up- 
dated kitchen and bath, Johns- 
burg Schools, private beauti- 
fully landscaped backyard, 
noar Chaln-o-lakes accoss 
and Molra. $124,900 (708) 
497-9083 Appolnlmonl. 

JOHNSBURG/LAKE 
DAWN WOOD, 5-bedroom, 
3-bath. 2-story home, sitting 
on beautiful wooded tot wllh 
pond, private setting, whirlpool 
master suite, country kitchen, 
approximately 3,000sq.tt, plus 
lull llnlshed walk-out, base- 
ment. Priced welt below mar- 
ket. $219,000. (815) 
344-9335. 



KENOSHA, South Side, 
7807-23rd Ave. 2-bodroom, 
brick ranch. Largo rooms, fin- 
ished basoment, central air. 
Move-in condition Great 
neighborhood. Groat Schools. 
(414)657^323. 

LAKE ZURICH, FOR SALE 
BY OWNER. Dcslrablo Hunt- 
er's Crook. Lovely 3«bedroom 
plus loft, 2.5 baths. Fully land- 
scaped with largo deck. Fan- 
tastic lot backs up to open 
space. Excellont condition, 
neutral docor. $282,000. (708) 
540-8930 ' 

TWIN LAKES WISCON- 
SIN. Energy efficient bklevel 
2,000plus sq, II., 3 fbodrooms, 
cathedral ceiling, low main- 
tenance. Cul-de-sac, great 
schools, close to golf course. 
Asking $147,000. (414) 
877-3096. 

WAUCONDA, NEW 4-BED- 
ROOM, 3-car garage, walk- 
out basement. (708) 
367-1122 days. . 



For Sale By Owner 

3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath 
sptit-level with attached 

2 car garage. Brick 

fireplace in family room. 

Gurnee school district. 

$171,500 

(108)249-3361 



•••••FOR SALE 

NEW CONSTRUCTION 

McHENRY (east side) Beautiful 3 br, 2 ba Tri- 
Level, C/A, Oak Trim & Much More!! 
$149,900 

FOX LAKE, 3 br, 2 ba Contemp. wAvhtrlpool, 
ceramic & FP, Must See!! $135,900 

WONDER LAKE, 2 br Walk-Out w/Den, 
Quality Const, at a Great Price! ! $99,900 

WATERFRONT 

WAUCONDA, Nice 2 br Ranch w/FP, Pier & 
Seawall on Bangs Lake!! $174,900. 

McHENRY, 3 br, 3 ba Contemp. w/4 car gar. 
& HUGE lot on Fox River to Chain-O-Lakes!! 
$279,900 (Priced Below Market!) 

■ For Additional Info. Call 

RYAN & COMPANY REALTORS 
708/526-0300 



Start with 

the best value in a 

quality home. . . 




.And take 3 F 
APPLIANCES 

Let us build your new quality-built home 
during the off-season, and we'll give you 
3 free appliances! That's a $1,750 value! 
Or, take 50% OFF your choice of 
appliances— up to $3,000 value 
(depending upon options). Remember: 

• This Is a limited time offer 

• Delivery restrictions apply 

See me today for these 
^ -m^^and other savings! 

GQofliek, 




COUNTY UNE BUILDERS 

216 Janet Drive ^ 
Island Lake 

708-526-8306 



BUSCHMAN COMPANIES 

300 N. Milwaukee Ave. Ste. A 
Lake Villa 

708-265-0230 



Pis. . / 



ScpTeMbe* 10, 1994 UIceIancI Newspapers CLASSIFIED 




ROUND LAKE PARK. 310 

Brierblll Hill Drive 2 bedroom, 
completely redecorated home 
on double fenced-in lot. Seller 
Brokered/Soller Financed 
Groat Investment or Great 
Starter - BIG SAVINGS 
WITH GENEROUS TERMS 
$67,000 (706) 546-^056 



Mchenry- raised ranch. 

3-bcdroom. Finished lower 
level, deck, energy efficient, 
2-car garage. Many up- 
grades! River rights. Avail- 
able August 1st. Contract 
Possible. i 131 ,000, 

$127,900. (70S) 526-8306. 



Lakeland ClasBltieds 
Get the Job Done! 
Call (708)223-81 61 



MCHENRY-THIS WILL GO 
FASTI I Lovely new 4-bed- 
room, 3-tull baths, spilt level 
home on wooded lot accros3 
from beautiful Morralne Hills 
State Park. Quality construc- 
tion, cathedral callings, fire- 
place, appliances. Main- 
tenance free exterior, 2.5-car 
finished garage. Completed 
lawn and drive. Plus many 
more extras. $152,500 CALL 
NOW. Financing available. 
Contact: Senate r Builders, Inc. 
{815)459-1333 or 1-800-546- 
1339. 




WINCHESTER 2 >— J 

If you are looking for a comfortable, well designed home, modest In price, the Winchester 2 Is your 
answer. - 

. Within 1,152 square feet of Irving space are three bedrooms and two bathrooms. The garage, with 
an additional 460 square feat, could easily be converted to a recreation room, If the extra Irving space 
Is desired, or used as a workshop for the do-it-yourself person In the household. 
S The large living room Is the place friends and family can gather to enjoy each other's company. 
A skylight brightens the atmosphere, and for those cold times of the year, a built-in wood stove 
spreads the warmth. Weather permitting, a small patio can be accessed through a sliding glass door 
(or relaxing in the sun or having a barbecue with the whole gang. A dining room and adjacent Li- 
shaped kitchen, complete with built-in appliances,- transform this entire section of the house into a 
great room, where foot traffic flows unimpeded. Groceries and other Items can be brought Inside 
directly from the garage or the adjoining carport without worry. 

The lavish master suite Is filled with amenities. Occupying one complete side of the house, It fea 
tures a huge walk-in closet, private bath, separate vanity, skylight and a sliding glass door that leads 
to Its own private patio. 

Two Identical bedrooms, each with ample closet space, are nearby. This Is an Ideal situation for 
parents with young children. They are able -to maintain their privacy, while still being able to keep 
tabs on the youngsters. For empty nesters or retired couples, one of these rooms could be used as 
the guest bedroom and the other for a small den, sewing room or home office. This design lets you 
decide. 

The second bathroom Is located In the hallway along with extra closet storage space. Another 
closet Is positioned behind the door In the entry. 

For a study kit of the WINCHESTER 2 (402-28), send $9.00, to Landmark Designs, P.O. Box 
2307-LP60, Eugene, OR 97402 (Be sure to specify plan nama & number). For a collection ol plan 
books featuring Landmark's most popular home plans, send $20 to Landmark. 




What's New 
On the Market 




AFFORDABLE 

TOWNHOMES ON 

SALE NOW!! HURRY!! 

Minules lo Abbott; Baxter and 

Lakehurst. 1 and 2 bedroom 

units starting . at 543,900. 

Romantic fireplace, deck, pool, 

sauna, appliances, cathedral 

ceiling. Much cheaper than rent 

- country, club living - superb 

convenient location! 

Ask 4 Brenda or Gary 

Cornerstone Realty 

872-8998 




.AKELAND NEWSPAPER'S 
CLASSIFIEDS 

(708)223-8161 



LAKEVIEW WOODLANDS 
OPEN HOUSE, SUNDAY, 
OCTOBER 2, 1pm-4pm. 
Quality alt brick tudor with 5- 
bedrooms, formal dlnlngroom, 
sunroom, 3-car garage, with 
high doors. Situated among 
gorgeous oak trees on a pri- 
vate pond. Presteglous area 
near Wauconda. 28302 Lake 
View Circle ( Rt. 176 to Danoll 
Rd. North to Lake View, left to 
house). $299,000. ERA J. S. 
JAMES (708) 381-5555 Char- 
lotte Brady-Agent. 



ANTIOCH GREAT CUL- 
DE-SAC location, with large 
back yard and 80ft. non chain 
water frontage. 2-story cotonh 
al, 3 -bedroom, central air, ex- 
posed basement, patio doors, 
natural fireplace, bay wind- 
ows. 2-story tamlryroom, dock, 
security system. Enjoy nature 
from deck overlooking a pri- 
vate back yard and peer. Built 
in 1932, 1111 Edgowater 
Lane. Heron Harbor Subdivi- 
sion. Open Sunday October 
2nd. I2pm-4pm. $199,950. 
(708) 395-7029. 



GURNEE/PRICED TO 

SELL, DUPLEX TOWN- 
HOUSE, END UNIT. 34098 
WHITE OAK (WOODLAND 
HILLS SUBDIVISION, 

NEW SECTION). OPEN 
HOUSE, SUNDAg OCTOB- 
ER 2nd, 11 am -5pm. Quail-' 
ty, beautiful view, private patio 
faces woods, 2-bedroom. loft, 
family/diningroom, 2.5 car ga- 
rage, air, 1.5 baths, neutral 
decor. All appliances and 
window treatments included, 
bow window. Many upgrades. 
Si23,900/negoiiablo. By Own- 
er. (708) 855-0305. 



FOR SALE BY OWNER. 
OPEN HOUSE, SATUR- 
DAY AND SUNDAY, 1pm- 
5pm, 2407 Deerpath Dr., Lfn- 
denhurst. 3-bodroom ranch. 1- 
bath. Spacious walk-out deck. 
All neutraPcolors. Newer cen- 
tral air and heat. Newly remo- 
deled kitchen and bath. Low 
taxes. Close to school and 
shopping. $120,900.(708) 
356-1624. 



FOR RENT. (1) 2-bed- 
room, rental. Appliances. 
Adults. No pets, references re- 
quired. McHenry, on the 
Chain. (815) 344-3944. ■ . ' 

2 BEDROOM COTTAGE 
on Petite Lake. $550 plus utili- 
ties and socurtty deposit. (708) 
395-5045 

BARRINGTON TOWER 

LAKES, 1 -bedroom, lull base- 
ment, attached garage, large 
fireplace, llvlngroom. 

$840/month. (708) 566-0613. ' 

GRAYSLAKE 3-BED- 

ROOM HOUSE. In country. 
$825/month, plus security do- 
posit. Non-smoker, no pots. 
Available 11/1/94. (708) 
22S-0729. 

INGLESIDE- 2 BED- 

ROOM home, nice yard, 
basement, fireplace. Newer 
carpeting and bathroom. $620 
per month phis utilities. Avail- 
able Oct. 1. Call Ra^h, days. 
(708)390-8050, ext. 667 or 
evenlng3,(708)546-S809. 

ISLAND LAKE 1 -bedroom 
coach house overlooking lake. 
Newly decorated. $675/month 
plus security, heat Included. 
(708) 526-7255. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH - 3 
bedroom with lull basement 
on qutet street. Available irrv ' 
mediately, $795/month plus 
$1,000 security deposfty (708) 
945-5217. 



JOHNSBURG RIVER 

FRONT! Cozy 2-bedroom, 1- 
balh, 2-car garage, large - 
deck. Enjoy tho water all year, 
with pier and shore station. 
$800/month, $1,000 security, 
references. Available Novem- 
ber 1.(708) 740-8274. 

LAKE CATHERINE 
HOUSE nestled among the 
oaks. Prime location, 2-bed- 
rooms, 1.5-baihs, carpeted, 
sky-lights, deck, flrepaco, 
Beautifully landscaped, lawn 
caro provided. Boat s\\p. For 
non-partying adult or couple. 
References. $750/monfh. 
Available October 15th or No- 
vember 1st. (708) 395-6342 
days, or (708) 395-5530 
evenings. 

LAKE VILLA DUPLEX 3- 
bedrooms, 1-1/2-balhs^ wlth- 
garage. $825/month. Call alter 
6pm. (815) 363-9039. 

LAKE VILLA HOUSE 4-bed- 

rooms, SflSO/month. Call after 
6pm. (815) 363-9039. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 2- 

bedroom, lott, privacy fenced 
In back yard, washer/dryer. 
$675/month. (708)740-3922. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH. 3- 

bedroom house, 1532 Lotus. 
Central air. full basement. 
$750/rnonth plus security de- 
posit. Available October 1st. 
(708) 395-8465. 



ZAMPARO and GOLDSTEIN, P.C. 

Attorneys for Plaintiff 

899 Skokle Boulevard, Suite 300 

Northbrook, Illinois 60062 

(70S) 564-3100 

STATE OF ILLINOIS, COUNTY OF LAKE, SS. - IN 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDI 
CIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. CHEMICAL 
BANK, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND 
SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF JANUARY 
31, 1990, SERIES 1990-1, PLAINTIFF v. MARY 
WILLIAMS, BRUCE WILLIAMS, DEPARTMENT OF 
PUBLIC WORKS OF COUNTY OF LAKE.. UNKNOWN 
TENANTS, UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON-RECORD 
CLAIMANTS, DEFENDANTS, NO. 94 CH 198. 

Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to t 
Judgment made and entered in said Court in the above 
entitled cause, the Sheriff of Lake County, Illinois will, on 
Monday, October 31, 1994, at the hour of 9:00 a.m. 
(C.D.T.) at 25 South Utica, Waukegan, Illinois, sell at 
public auction the following described premises and real 
estate mentioned In said Judgment, situated in Lake 
County, Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient 
to satisfy the Judgment, to-wit: 
Commonly known as: 

34219 Hainesvitle Road, Round Lake, Illinois 60073 
Improved with a single family residence. 

Sale shall be under the following terms: 10% down, 
balance within 24 hours. Premises will not be open for 
inspection. 

For information contact: Roger Zarnparo, Jr., ZAM 
PARO and GOLDSTEIN, PC, Plaintiff's Attorney, 899 
Skokie Boulevard, Suite 300, Northbrook, Illinois 60062, 
Telephone: (708) 564-3100. 

Dated: August 31, 1994. Waukegan, Illinois 



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY - WAUKEGAN, ILLINOIS 
NBD HIGHLAND PARK BANK. N.A. 
Plaintiff, 
V. 92 CH 59 

ROBERT E.WIEN, er si. 
Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SHERIFF/JUDICIAL SALE 
PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE 
PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a 
Judgment ol Foreclosure and Sale entered by the Court in the 
above captioned cause on May 18, 1992, the Sheriff ol Lake 
County, Illinois, will on October 3, 1994 at/in the Robert H 
Babcock Justice Center, 25 South Utica Street, Conference 
Room, First Floor, Waukegan, Illinois 60085, at 9:00 a.m., sell at 
public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, the follow- 
ing described real estate mentioned In said Judgment, situated in 
Lake County, Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to 
satisfy said judgment to wit: 

Commonly known as 1222 Crofton Ave., Highland Park, 
Illinois. 

Together with all buildings and Improvements thereon. This Is 
a single-family, 1 1/? story 3 bedroom home with attached 
garage. 

The name and address of the person to contact for Informa 
tton regarding this real estate and the sale is: 
Ethan E. Trull, Esq. 

Seylarth, Shaw, Falrweather & Geraldson 
Suite 4200 
55 East Monroe 
Chicago, Illinois 60603 
(312) 346-8000 
This property Is NOT open for Inspection. 
This Is an "As Is" sale "CASH", requiring the successful bidder 
to deposit ten percent (10%) ol the bid at the time ol the sale and 
the balance with the Sheriff within 24 hours of the sale. This prop- 
erty Is being sold withoui any warranty or representation whatso- 
ever as to the condition of title and withoui recourse to the sell, 
Plaintiff.- or any olhor oarty to this lawsuit 



SMALL 1-BEDROOM, LIV- 
INGROOM/KITCHEN/D1- 
NINGROOM. Socluded In- 
gleslde. $550/month, plus util- 
ities. References required. 
Prefer single person. Available 
October 1st. (706)587-2413. 

SMALL 3-BEDROOM 
HOUSE (n Round Lako Park, 
pay own utilities, absolutely no 
pets. ' $625/month, 1-month 
rent as security deposit. (70S) 
546-1260 after 4pm. 

TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN 3-room, 1 -bedroom 
newly remodeled house for 
rent. Large lot, on quiet si met. 
Rent S425 /month, security de- 
posit $500. Available October 
1. (708) 387-0745 or (708) 
,795-0055. 

TWO BEDROOM HOME 

overlooking Round Lake, 
5625/month we cut grass and 
shovel snow. Or $400/rnonth 
you cut grass and shovel 
snow, untitles not Included. 
Call Theresa (708) 541-0900. 

WAUKEGAN 2-bedroom 

plus den, large Uvfngroom. eat- 
In kitchen, full dry basement, 
off street parking. Qutet area. 
Close to naval base. (708) 
336-7576 after 5pm, leave 
message with name and 
phone number. 



■ Grayslake ; 
2 School District • 

■9 room, 4 bedroom* 
■farm house for rent. All' 
■appliances Included,' 
■water Included, utlll- 1 
■ties are not. Available 
"Nov. 1st or sooner. 
J $n00,00/month. 
■ (708) 234-4635 i 



508 


Homes Wanted 



STOP FORECLOSURE- ARE 
YOU FACING BANKRUPT- 
CY- DIVORCE- PROBATE- 
UNEMPLOYMENT. We Buy 
Houses, W« Loan Money. 
All Caah or Terms. Fast 
Settlement. Scott: (70S) 
94S-823S. 



514 



Condo/Town Homes 



GURNEE 2-BEDROOM, 2- 
BATH townhouse, fireplace, 
vaulted celling, new carpel, 
air. Golf, swimming etc. 
$87,000. (7Q8)'367-6535. 

VACATION VILLAGE, 2- 
BEDROOM, ground level, 
new carpet and ceramic tile. 
$60,000. (312) 915-2348 
days, (708) 640-6896 even- 
ings. 



ZAMPARO and GOLDSTEIN, P.C. 

Attorneys for Plaintiff 

B99 Skokle Boulevard, Suite 300 

Northbrook, Illinois 60062 

(708)564-3100 

STATE OF ILLINOIS. COUNTY OF LAKE, SS. - IN 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL 
CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY. ILLINOIS. THE ACADEMY 
GROUP, INC.. PLAINTIFF v. AMERICAN NATIONAL 
BANK AND TRUST COMPANY OF CHICAGO, AS 
TRUSTEE U/T/A DATED AUGUST 24, 1977, AND 
KNOWN AS TRUST NO. 4-11 09, ROBERT BROMBERG, 
EDNA PINKIE BROMBERG, NORTH SHORE SANI- 
TARY DISTRICT, UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON- 
RECORD CLAIMANTS, DEFENDANTS, NO. 93 CH 614. 

Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a 
Judgment made and entered In said Court in the above- 
entitled cause, the Sheriff of Lake County, Illinois will, on 
Monday, October 31, 1994, at the hour of 9:00 a.m. 
(C.D.T) at 25 South Utica, Waukegan, Illinois, sell at 
public auction the following described premises and real 
estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated In Lake 
County, Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient 
to satisfy the Judgment, to-wit: 
Commonly known as: 

1255 North Avenue, Highland Park, Illinois 60035. 
Improved with a single family residence. 

Sale shall be under the following terms: 10% down, 
balance within 24 hours. Premises will not ba open for 
inspection. 

For information contact: Laurence J. Goldstein, ZAM 
PARO and GOLDSTEIN, P.C, Plaintiffs Attorney, 899 
Skokie Boulevard, Suite 300, Northbrook, Illinois 60062, 
Telephone: (708) 564-3100. 

Dated: August 31, 1994. Waukegan, Illinois 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
Independence One Mortgage Corporation, 

Plaintiff, Case No. 94 C 1223 

VS. . Judge Castillo 

Stewart A. Lltwln and Martha D. Litwln, 
Household Finance Corporation 111 
Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 26264 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered in the above entitled cause on June 7, 1994. 

I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
October 18, 1994 at the hour ol 9:15 am at the front door of Lake 
County Courthouse - Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder 
lor cash, the following described premises: 

1 126 N. Shore Dr., Wauconda, IL 60084 
The improvements on the property consist of single family, alu- 
minum with an attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 

hours, certified funds. No relunds. The sale shall be subject to 

general taxetfahdio special assessments. 

The property%UI NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount was Si 36,157.37 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will. receive e 

Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 

specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 

Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 

4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 

Officer Is noj required to provide additional Information other than 

that set forth In this Notice. 










CLASSIFIED UkdANd Newspapers ScpttMben JO, 1 994 



514 



Condo/Town 
Homes 



FOX LAKE- VACATION 
VILLAGE-BEAUTIFUL 2- 

IqvoI 1 •bedroom romodolod 
condo. Spiral staircase to bod- 
room and bath. Sconlc vlow of 
Marina from patio. Ideal year 
round Irving or weekend geta- 
way. Central air, now carpotod 
living area, parquet flooring In 
s bedroom, new kitchen sink, 
countortop, and floor area. 
New bathroom Itoor. New hot- 
water heater. Pool, clubhouse, 
laundry facility, tennis courts, 
etc. Managed by owners. 
Complete outdoor main- 
tenance program. 24/hr. Full 
security. $34,900. (70S) 
587-4029. 

WAUCONOA 2-BED- 

HOOM, 2-BATH, condo for 
rent, on Bangs Lake. Seven 
month rental. $725/month, 
heat and air Included. (708) 
424-0566. 



518 


Mobile Homes 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



KENOSHA 1992 FRIEND- 
SHIP-ASPEN 16x72. Central 
air, dock, shed, all appliances. 
Many oxtras. Financing avail- 
able. 532,500. (414) 
942-9SA1. 

MOBILE COUNTRY LIV- 
ING at Its best, $15,000. 
Owner witl carry S3. 000 down 
payment Interest tree land 
contract. (414) 537-4208. 

, MOBILE HOME 1993 OAK- 
WOOD, 14x80, 3-bedroom, 
2-baths. All appliances Includ- 
ed, washerAdryer. S22.000. 
(708)724-6601. 

MOBILE HOME FOR SALE. 
1989, I6ftj(70ft., 2-bedroom, 
2-balh, all appliances, central 
air. storage shed, shingled 
roof, enclosed porch, comer 
lot. MUST SEE TO APPRECI- 
ATE. $44,900. CALL (708)546- 
8828. 

MOBILE HOME, 5-ROOM, 

good condition, well Insulated, 
tow utility bills, all appliances 
Included, extended warran- 
ties. 2-sheds, on double corn- 
er tot. Woodland School Dis- 
trict. Reduced to $7,000. Call 
. after 3pm Monday-Friday. An- 
ytime weekends (708) 
662-4317. 

MOBILE HOMES- SIN- 
GLES and Doubles. 2-3 bed- 
rooms. Lake County and Ke- 
nosha County. Bank loans and 
appraisals. 5% Down on Any 
New Home Financed. (708) 
836-1965. 

MODULARS 'DOU- 
BLEWIDES, *SIN- 
GLEWIDES, 'TWO 
STORY MODULAR ON 
DISPLAY! FOUNDA- 
TIONS, BASEMENTS, GA- 
RAGES, WELLS, SEPT- 
ICS. WE DO IT ALLII 
FREE STATEWIDE DELIV- 
ERY/SET. RILEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1- 
■00-798-1541. 

MUST SELLII 1989 

14X70, 2 large bedrooms, 2 
lull baths with garden tub, fire- 
place, nice yard with shed. 
Many upgrades, would be 
great far retirement couple. 
. $26,000(708)336-0309. 



APARTMENTS AND 

HOMES FOR RENT- In the 
Kenosha area. For Informa- 
tion on available rentals, 
phone Rental information 
Sorvices. (414)652 0609. 

FOX LAKE 1 -bedroom bUov- 
el. $540/monlh plus deposit, 
all utilities. No pets. (312) 
660-6792 hooper. 

GRAYSLAKE- 2-bedroom 
apartment with balcony, 
freshly painted, adults pre- 
ferred, lyr. lease, security de- 
posit, no pots. $595/month. 
(708)729-3767. 

HA1NESVILLE- 2-BEDROOM 
APARTMENTS, new 6/unll 
building, carpeting, and laun- 
dry facilities, S625/month 
^security. Taking applica- 
tions now for Immediate oc- 
cupancy. No pots. Call (708) 
546-1474. 

LAKE VIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS. Largo 1+2- 
bodroom apartments. Lake 
Villa. $545 and $680/month. 
Heal water, air Included. 
(708)356-5474. 

LARGE 1-BEDROOM, 

2ION, Free heat, wator, gas. 
Coin laundry, air, parking, ca- 
ble. $475/monlh. (70S) 

5B7-7217. 

LARGE STUDIO APART- 
MENT IN FOX LAKE. Air, car- 
peting, pool, tennis, boat slip, 
acces to chaln-o-lakes. Avail- 
able immediately. (708) 

336-4733 

MUNDELEIN 1-BED- 

ROOM, COUNTRY sotting. 
Includes utilities. $425/month 
plus security. (708) 949-6451 
leave message. 

NEAR NAVAL BASE, clean, 
furnished, 1 -bedroom, spare 
room. $405/month plus elec- 
tric. Free Heat. (708) 
662-4760. 

ORCHARD APARTMENTS- 
3-1/2 miles west of CLC on 
Washington St. 2/bedrooms, 
carpeted, laundry facility. No 
pets. No waterbeds. Lease. 
5560/monlh, gas/heat/ water 
Included. (708) 328-6674. 

SPRING GROVE. SMALL 
2-bedroom air conditioned 
apartment., second floor. No 
Pets. $525/monlh plus securi- 
ty deposit. Includes heal, wa- 
ter, sewer, stove, refrigerator 
and ample parking. (815) 
675-2860. Loave Message. 

UNION GROVE, Wl. 2-bed- 
room apartments. FREE heat. 
New carpet. Celling Fan. Mini 
blinds. Close to schools. No 
pets. From $490/month. (414) 
878-4809. 

VERNON. HILLS, available 
October. 1. Spacious 2-bed- 
room, 1-1/2 bath apartments. 
$655/month. No Pets. (708) 
526-9283. 

VERY NICE 2-BEDROOM 
apartment, North side Wauke- 
gan, downstairs flat of house. 
1-car garage, basement stor- 
age, laundry facilities, nice 
yard. $525/month plus utilities. 
No pets. No section 8. (708) 
249-1089 afier 4pm. 



All ml ctliK rterfcui la (fata nmppr k wbject to Ik Menl Mr 

Hou^Ad*tifchmiiiailttk|»IU>»<*»eryKi^ 

aiofciiJon bwd on nee, odor, raUftoo, m, htftdfap, katiUl uUa or 

Htall origin, or m infanta to mike tar •** prdrflBo»,liiiiluaoaiordii* 

crtato^talt*i^riD*ri«rtn»Kin|of fc o ii o fr 

is ttUfan, he IMrti Hum Krf* Ad pett* ofcatakai-buedon 
M.incMlrjffijrtil^Uii^wwttwilfcdiK^ 
nl tamfctfr we** ■foMrWai tor ml «Hte rtkhrioHoi tat In Ml jwr- 



NrHouriagAlKmtaB 



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520 



Apartments 
For Rent 



520 



Apartments 
For Rent 



520 



Apartments 
For Rent 



520 



.Apartments 
For Rent 



534 



Business Property 
For Sale 



WAUCONDA- ONE BED- 
ROOM Apartment, newly 
decorated, living room, kitch- 
en. Carpoled, yard, stovo, re- 
frigerator, heat and hoi wator 
Included. $5l5/monlh, lease 
and security. No pets. Avail- 
able Immediately. (708)433- 

0891. 

_^ ^— ^^^— ^^— 

WAUKEGAN- 2 BEDROOM, 
cottages, Victorian setting, 
off street parking, Available 
now. S650-$750/month. 
(708) 336-0144. 

ZION-EAST SIDE. 2-bed- 
room, dose to townVlraln. New 
carpot/palnl +. Military wel- 
come. Section 8 not available. 
No Pets. $595/month. (708) 
831-5388. 



jtSZ&S' 



MUNDELEIN 

Spacious, lovely I & 2 
bedroom apartments. 

Secure building. 
Manager on premises. 

Laundry facilities. 
Available Immediately. 
Minutes to shopping. 
|_ CALL 
|j(708) 5&27WL 



tmmmmmmmm 



STATIONSIDE 
VILLAGE 

I 52151 1TH AVENUE i 
KENOSHA, Wl 

Luxurious living 

: Apartments & Townhouscs ! I 

2 Bedrooms • 2 Baths 

Mini Blinds 

Appliances 

Garages Available 

Elevators 

No Pets 

i Call (414) 656-1010 ii 

nmmmmmiuiumutl 



v. 



v 



WAUKEGAN 

One bedroom, heat . 

included New carpet & 

paint, quiet building, no 

pets. $450/mo. One mo. 

security deposit required, 

(708) 939-0970 



->» 



# 



it Ingleslda * 

t **30<K 00 J 

Ar Security Deposit it 

* on * 

J One & TWo Bedrooms* 

J 'Spacious J 

^ 'Private Balconies ^ 

^ «Short term leases avail. ^ 

* Lakeview $ 

* Apartments* 

* (708)587-9277 * 

if 'quaffiad applicants, lyrlaaso if 
*•••*•••**•• 



WESTWIND 

VILLAGE 

APARTMENTS 

2200 Lcwli Ave., Zlon 

RENTING FROM $395 

Appliances • Custom Blindi 

On-site Manager 

No Pets 

(708) 746-1420 

(708) 731-1804 

or Bear Property 

Managemtnt 

(414) 697-9616 



rvy» ■•«•«««««■•* «\YA 



i 



; Water's Edge Apartments! 

September 1 Bedroom Special 
1 month FREE Rent 

•FREE gas heat, cooking & water 
•Spaciously designed apartments 
•Patio or balcony available 

250 S. ftte. 59 - Fox Lake ^». 

(708) 587-6888 OQ 



Antloch's 

lines! 2 bedroom 

- apartments. 

1 bath or f 1/2 baths. 

Balcony or patio. 

Extra storage. 

No Pets. 

Ask about senior ■ 

citizen incentives 

Military clause. 

Rent 1 6207mo.«r sec 

(708)838-0655 



528 



Apl/liomcs 
To Share 



Anita 
>| terrace p 

ilLliJUI.inJH 



LAKE VILLA. NEW HOME 
CONSTRUCTION. Garage 
space Included. Male/Female. 
Non-smoker. $400/month, all 
utllites excluding telephone. 

(70B) 265-0785. 

ROOMMATE WANTED. 

$425/monlh, includes utilities. 
Protorrably omployod. First 
months rent and hall security 
required. Ask lor Tony. (708) 
567-1701 alter 4pm. 



HBHBBBBHBHBBBHBB1 

| CAR LOT | 

jj Brick Bldg on g 

g Rt 1 2, Richmond, g 

| I Bay, office, garage g 

E & storage. Excellent g 

jj visibility. Alternate g 

d use OK. $695/mo. 3 
n a 

g Land Hgmnt 8 

P 8I5-678-477I 

n ■ • a 

■BBBByBBBBBBBBaa 



538 



Bustncss Property 
For Rent 



530 



Rooms For Rait 




PEBBLESHIRE 
PHASE I 

Spacious, modern 1 & 2 bdrm 

apts from $573 

FREE heat & cooking gas. 

•PLUSH CARPETING 
•MODERN APPLIANCES 
•LAUNDRY FACILITIES IN 
EVERY BUILDING 
•ON SITE MAINTENANCE 
MINUTES FROM 
HAWTHORN CENTER 



708-367-4504 

695 Westmoreland Dr. (lj 



•Microwave Ovens 

•Dishwashers 

•Washers & Dryers 

•Vaulted Ceilings 

•Patios or Balconies 

•Convenient Location 

(708) 356-0800 

705 Water's Edge Dr. 

Lake Villa, IL 

On Routs 132 (Grand Ave.) 

Just east of Route 93 at (he 

south sido of Deep Lake 

Pmttmknilhf 

rf^S mintgtdbf 

\SJ Mtmgimitt 

AwAy ftrtwri 



ABBOTT LAB ENGINEER 
SEEKING FURNISHED 

ROOM. PLEASE CALL 
ANTHONY (70B) 938- 
8440 PAYS. 

ROOM FOR RENT. Wlnth- 
rop Harbor, use ot kitchen priv- 
ileges. References required. 
$400/monlh; plus $400 depos- 
it. (70B) 746-4550. 

ROOMS FOR RENT. Wa- 
terfront rooms on Fox Lake. 
Only $100/week Including uni- 
ties. (708) 356-2747. 

ROUND LAKE Beach - laun- 
dry and kitchen facilities In- 
cluded 385/Wook, available 
now, references required 
(708) 740-3309. 

WAUCONDA FURNISHED 

ROOM, kitchen privileges, In 
lake side home. $70/wk. (708) 
526-7891. 



GURNEE-LIGHT INDUS- 
TRIAL, 3,300sq.ft., at S4ft, 
Call Property Management 
PIUS (708) 244-6155. 

Rt. 59 Office 1 
For Rent 

|Rt. 59 offices & ware- 
house for rent. 1,000 - 
•3,000 .sq.' ft. New bldg, j 
ikitchen from $595/mo: 

RE/MAX Advantage 

(708)395-3000 

Michael Lescher 

I "Vow Urtk to the Chaln'l 



Downtown main street 
Professional/Medical 
Up to 1200 S.F. plus 
Large lobby,' storage, 

(708) 566-2252 



560 



Yacort lot/Acreage 




»j Business Property 

'"■■■' For Rent 



WILDWOOD AREA, AIR 

conditioned, office for lease 
l,000sq.ft., newly decorated, 
available September 15. Call 
today. (708)223-8691. 



Lakeland Classifieds 
Get the Job Done! 
Call (708)223-81 61 



Ingleslde 
Vacant Lot 

[Sewer & Waterf 

ilngleside - level,. 
Jvacant lot, 66x132 with! 
'sewer & water.' 
I$34,900. 

RE/MAX Advantage 

(708) 395-3000 

Michael Lescher 

i "Your Link to the Chain" 



LAKELAND MORTGAGE MARKET 



(A Service Of Mortgage Market Information Services And Lakeland Newspapers) 



CALL FOR TODAY'S BEST RATES 

& FINANCIAL UPDATES ...9am, noon. Som 



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Consumers or lefKlers, 
call Robin at 708-834-7555 



LIUINQ. II, mo.. R« a idlnllll Uorlus. LI 

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«eu!«*» tut Ml MnliMl 

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Sepmtbtn JO, 1994 Uksktid Newspapers CLASSIFIEPfy ' 



ZAm-. 




Vacant lot/Acreage 




Out Of Area 
Property 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



710 



Boats/Motors/ 
Etc 



804 



Cars for Sale 



804 


Can for Sale 



fAUKECA* 

6 ACRES PRIME 
lEVELOPNMf IAW 

Lloned R-6 Multi-Family 

■Maximum of 168 Mi 

«Clote to Shopping, 
Tuniportation and 
Great Lakes Naval Base 

Ralph 
DePasquale 

Grubb & Ellis 



o 



Gmbbr.Ellia (708) 390-8050 
"" — x667 



564 



Resort/VacaUon 
Rentals 



RESORT FOR SALE BY 

3WNER. 12011. on East Loon 
jakQ, Anlloch, 6-modem fur- 
bished cabins, 2-1/2 car ga- 
tage at waters edge. Cabins 
on Mol plus adjoining lot. Will 
divide cabins from other lot. 
|(70B) 531-0857 fordelalls. __ 



NAPLES, FLORIDA 

Spend Christmas In A Tropical 
Paradise Overlooking The Gull 01 
Mexico! New 4brJrm, 4blh home, 
den, w/2 screened porches. Stop 
out on Die beautiful white sands ol 
Qortila Seech. 15 ml. south of Ft 
Myers/avail November, December 
4 April. S3. GOO por mo. 

813-643-3100/813-643-2988 



568 



Quiff Area Propcrt) 



FINAL CLOSEOUTI Save 
thousands on Lake Barkley, 
Ky. bargains. 1.5 acres from 
$7,900. Nicely wooded with 
lake access, near stale park. 
On country road with utilities 
and protective covenants. 
Lakelront also available. Per- 
iod for vacation retirement. 
Excellent financing. Limited 
lots remain. Call. now 1-800- 
853-1323. ext. .1891. Wood- 
land Acres. 8:30-8:30, 7-days. 

WILDERNESS CREEK 

FRONTAGE, $19,900. Wa- 
ters Meet Lake, boat to Eagle 
River, only S27.9O0. Hunting 
Acreage, borders National for- 
est, S9.700. Scattering Rice 
Lake, get on the quiet side of 
ihe chain, S57, 900. Newly 
constructed Model Home, pri- 
vate Lake, hurry, the last one 
sold In 2-days, $77,450. Four 
Seasons Realty Minocqua 1- 
800-548-6933. 



Ml. • Lake Michigan Million $ 
Views. We I aft nature unspoiled 
so we could spoil YOUI Share 
good limes w/Tamlly/friends In 
exceptional home w/100' sandy 
beach. Spacious 4br, 3bth, 2 story 
liv./dln. rm. This space can't 
describe this tremendous home. 
Call Curt, 616-393-0444. CARINI 
S. ASSOCIATES REALTORS. 



a A. • N.E. Working cattle ranch 
blwn. 2 ot largest lakes in Georgia.' 
376 ac. lenced/X-lanced. 5000 si 
5BR, 4BA, colonial. 24x24 
ole/game rm, 1 br, Iba guest h so, 3 
c-gar w/studlo, 3br caretaker 
home. Carponter/mach. shop, 
barns, outbldgs, equlpt incl. 
$1,200,000. Owner fin. 
706/283-7674 for detail* 



IDAHO, BOISE 

l properties, adjacent-gated 
community, prestige nghbrhd, 
water wonderland, let home, 
beaut, landscaping, 3br, 2blh, for 
mat Hv./din, rms, extensive oak 
Interior, gourmet WL, $421,750. 
2nd Prop: 3br, 2.5bth. den, formal 
llv,/dln. rms, bit in entertainment 
center In (am. rm., $289,900. Call 
Wright Patterson R.E., 1-800 
658-3602, Betty, 208-686-5082 or 
Barbara, 20B-B87-3427 Brochure 
& video. 



MT.- Gat Away From HAIIl 

Il5 3 ac. w/well, 1/2 ml. riverfront 
|(no flooding). Low crime area, 
■electric, beautiful view, Bearlooth 
Imlrfs, 39 ml. Cody, WY. 27 ml. ski 
I resort on Hwy. 72. Hunt, fish, build 
lyour dream home, good winters, 
|SU9K. By Owner 

406-662-3615 



UTAH 

iBrand new custom home In SL 
■George. Near Bloomington 
[Country Club Golf Course, 
■Walkout bsmnt, many extras, 
IS269,000. Call Dave or Sharon 
(Weeks, 801-673-6184. ERA 
IB rakers at Bloomington. 



TX-WIMBERLEY 

(35 ml. to Austin) Hill country, Ig 
4 level rock home, 4br, 3bih, 
FR, 1r, DR, study, 2 (pics, Ig kll 
w/blt In, Ig deck w/hot tub, Inter 
com, sep 2 car gar., 1 1/4 ac. 
view, $595K nogo. 

Owner, 512/847-5381 pp 



TEXAS 

Farms tor sole In Texas 
Panhandle. 1 approx, 1 3/4 sec, 
producing (arm wllh spklr. & Irg. 
beaut, home, S923K, 2), approx. 
640 acs. In CRP until 10797. 4 6* 
wolls w/pumps In hole. S4B0K. Call 
Jim Owens, WINDMILL REALTY, 
Dumas. TX. 1-600-935-6814. 



WA. • 70* ft waterfront on Lake 
Washington S. Bellevua 12 mln. to 
Seattle Foundation In (or 4000 sq. 
It. house under existing smaller 
home. Beaut, night vu ot skyline 
I lies across take. 50' dock 
Saltwater access w/lreshwator 
moorage. Pvt lane, bike trail. 
$555K. By Owner, 206-747-2179 
to messg. ' 



MN. • Carved From Wilderness 
Near Lake Superior, 124 ac. farm 
w/renovated log home. Bam, 
fields, pond, antiques w/tum-key 
historic farmstead. J3Q8K, COB 
BLESTONE REALTY CO.. P.O. 
Box 365, Grand Marais, MN 55604 
or call Mike Raymond 

1-218-387-1118 



1987 LE SHARO-WINNE- 
BAQO, good condition. 
$12,500.(815)385-1083. 

LIKE NEW 1994 32H. Iravol 
trailer, sleeps 8, tull bath, air, 
self contained, microwave. 
Washer- dry or. Asking 

510,200. (708) 381-2339. 

CAR TOTE TOW DOLLY 
TRAILER, with spare tire, ex- 
cellent condition. (708) 
746-2403 aflor 4:30pm. 

DODGE 1978 CLASS C 
MOTOR HOME, 24ft. fully 
sell-contained, 87k mites, 
overhauled at 65k miles. Eve- 
rything In good working condl- 
tlon. $6,500, (414) 694-3971. 

END OF SEASON BAR- 
GAIN. 22ft. Layton travel trail- 
er. Excellent condition. $5,800. 
(708) 395-7997. 

JAYCO 1986 TRAVEL 
TRAILER, 26IL, new awning, 
separate bedroom, $6,300. 
Reese- trailer hitch, $75. (708)' 
244-4860. 

JAYCO 1989 ; POP-UP 
CAMPER. Designer series, 
sleeps-6. Excellent condition. 
Many options. $3,500. (414) 
857-9418. 



WA. within 10 mln. of Portland 
Int'l Airport in a very nice area 
ol Vancouver. 5 yr. old 3br, 
2344 s.t. Home on 1 level, mild 
winters, very low taxes, 
S223K. Call 1-206-687-5110 
or . write: W.R.B, Realty 
Company, 813 W. Main #18, 
Battle Ground, WA 98604. 



ONTARIO, CANADA 

Retire/Retreat - 4 Season. 2000 
s.l. log cottage, 3br, (urn. 140' on 
lake, gar., $350K. Also; 12 lots (7 
waterfronts, 5 rear, sell all or sep- 
arate), 16 ml. N, ol Walrton, nr 
airport. Approx. 800' waterfront, 
$1 Million for all. By Owner, call 
810-937-2214 forde tails. 



WA. - Get Out Ot The City! 
Spectacular Yakima River 
Property, Prosser, WA. River 
frontage, access to .payed 
road, springs, creeks, ' out 
slanding view of lower valley, 
excell. potential. Approx. 28.5 
ac. Horses, cattle, sub-div. 
S295K. 509/786-4505, Owner. 



E. Texas Resort 

Near Sabine Nad Forest. Bus conl. 
cenler/vac/corp retreat or retirement 
homes. (2) 18 hole golf courses. 
Hiking, fish, tennis, golf, more. 1400 
+/- ac. Developm't permits In place 
lor goll course homes/lots, Call 
MANHELM INTERNATL REALTY. 
1-800-639-0555 or 71 3-556-9421 for 
details or Fax 713496-3431. 



S.W. MONTANA 
PROPERTIES 

320+ acres. One of a kind proper- 
ty that a small airstrip could be put 
right on the property. This proper- 
ty borders Wall Creek Wildlife 
Management area, Public Lands 
& U.S. Highway 287. Great views 
ot Ihe Madison Range, Gmveiy 
Range & overlooks the Madison 
River. Priced al: $880,000.00 Call 
FAN MOUNTAIN REAL ESTATE, 
Inc., 406-662-5263 lor details. 



OKLAHOMA 

Choice Recreational Property 
(Corp. Relreat). 570 ac, 2 mi. 
frontage on Cimarron, No. 
Central Oklahoma. Also 3300 
s.f, home, 3br. 6.5 ac, S129K. 
Call SELECT- HOMES 
AGENCY, 1-800-737-4344 for 
details on both. 




5| Real Estate Wanted 



578 



Real Estate 

Misc. 



Mobile Home 

2 bedrooms, large, front 
living room, electric fire- 
place, air conditioning. 
Large storage building, 
\ Union Grove. 3 blocks 
from shopping. 
For appointment call: 

Sue or Amy 
(414) 878-4792 



WANTED LAND TO BOW 
HUNT on in Nothem lllnots or 
South Eastern Wisconsin. Will 
trade labor or pay small fee. 
Carpet and linoleum Installer 
by trade. Fred (708) 

546-3928. 



708 



Snrjwmobilcs/ATV's 



(1) 1984 ARTIC-CAT PAN- 
THER 440. $1,200. (414) 
862-2903. 

1990 ARCTIC CAT 440 
PROWLER. 1993 ARCTIC 
CAT 700 WILDCAT, both In 
excellent condition. Take both 
home lor $6,500. Call (or de- 
tails. David Jr. (708) 567-1992. 

SNOWMOBILE 1989 YA- 
MAHA EXCITER, with PSI 
650 Big Bore kit, Includes 
many extras $3,500. (4) place 
trailer $800. (708) 526-9932. 

SNOWMOBILE, PON- 

TOON, AND JET SKI 
TRAILERS BY TRITON. 
Check my prices. Dan's Surf & 
Turt. 1-800-646-2744. 




710 


BoaVMotors/Elc. 



P0OT00HS, BASS 
& FISHING BOATS 

Complete Er final 

fall clearance b 

liquidation. New 6 used. 

No reasonable offer 

refused. Save hundreds, 

even thousands! 

Woodland Pier I 

(414) 534-5264 



MERCURY & FORCE 
OWBOARDS 

Complete b final fall . 
clearance b liquidation. 
No reasonable offer 

refused. All sizes. 

Rush - save hundreds 

b even thousands! 

Woodland Pier I 

(414) 534-5264 



BOAT, AUTO AND RV stor- 
age available. Inskfo $15 a 
loot, outskto $10 a loot. (708) 
356-2747. 

FISHING BOAT MOTOR. 
Sears 7hp. outboard motor, 
shallow water drive. Like New! 
Only $400. Call Now Ihts will 
go qulckll (708)265-0246 alter 
5:30om. Mint Condition. Ac- 
cessories Included. 

HOBBIE CAT 16ft., good 
condition, with trailer, $1,200. 
Wl!) give' away 18ft. Melgas sin- 
gle hull with purchase ol Ho- 
ble. (708) 223-6245. 



1974 MARLIN, 16ft., 140hp 
I/O, roller trailer. Many extras. 
MUST SELL! (708) 215-7506 
Kevin. 

1988 FOUR WINNS, 160 
Freedom, 130 I/O, trailer. Ga- 
rage kept. $5,700rbes1. (708) 
587-7488 

28FT. CRUISERS, INC. 
VILLA VEE 1983. Ifybridge, 
lots ot electronics, excellent 
condition. At Kenosha. Wis- 
consin. Ready to sell, asking 
$26,000. Will discuss. 
WINTER STORAGE PAID. 
(706) 497-4970. 

ANTIQUE CLASSIC 1957 
WOODEN DELTA SPEED 
BOAT. ALL ORIGINAL 
EQUIPMENT. EXCEL- 

LENT CONDITION. 

$2,500. (708) 740^9006. 

BOAT 1989 16ft. Sea 
Sprit* Open Bow, excellent 
condition, 85hp Force out- 
board engine with power tilt, 
indudes Caulklns trailer and 
custom-made cover. $6,000 
or will trade tor pontoon. (708) 
395-2015. 

BOAT, 21fl. V-hull, walk- 
Ihru windshield. 302 V-8, very 
good condition, tandem axle 
trailer. $1,900/best. (708) 
298-2201. 



Sears 7hp. outboard 
motor, shallow water 
drive. Like Ncwl Only 
$400. Call Now, this 
will go qulckll 

(708) 26M246 

•Iter 5:30 p.m. 

Mint Condition. 
Accessories included 



SUNFISH SAILBOAT, ex- 
cellent condition, like new, 
$975. (708) 223-1395. 

WINTER STORAGE PAID1 
27tt.7ln. Concorde Express 
Cruiser. Sleeps-6, galley, hot 
water, twin 318*8, hater-radio, 
depth tinder, sum log. Must 
sell due to Illness. 12,000/best. 
(312) 478-5200. 



JON BOATS, DUCK 

SKIFFS, PADDLE 

BOATS & CANOES 

Factory Outlet 

Final fall clearance 

6 liquidation. 

Save Hundreds/ 

Woodland Pier I 

(414) 534-5264 



714 


Camping 



1984 KENT SKYLARK 32tl. 
Bunkhouse, air, 2-bedrooms, 
seasonally parked with deck 
and shed in rustic Wisconsin 
campground, $6,500. (708) 
658-7278. 




ENJOY BRANSON MUSIC 
SHOWS AND S1LER DOL- 
LAR CITY CRAFTS FESTI- 
VAL. Free reservation service 
tor beautiful Table Rock Lake 
resorts. Indian Point Chamber 
ol Commerce 1-80Q-BB8- 
3313. 

GOT A CAMPGROUND 
MEMBERSHIP OR TIME- 
SHARE? WE'LL TAKE IT. 
AMERICA'S MOST SUC- 
CESSFUL RESORT RE- 
SALE CLEARINGHOUSE. 
CALL RESORT SALES IN- 
FORMATION TOLL FREE 
HOTLINE 1-800-423- 

5967. 



720 



Sports Equipment 



1978 Z-28, 454 nitrous, au- 
tomatic, Candy Maroon, black 
Inferior, posl. $5,000/best. 
(708) 546-1918. - 

1986 Olds 88. New motor. 
Excellent condition, $3,500. 
(815) 385-0227. 

25th YEAR ANNIVER- 
SARY. 1976 Corvette, L-82 
engine, t-tops, 77,000 miles. 
Excellent condition, 
$8,500/bost. Must Sen. (708) 
244-2481. 

BERETTA 1994 Z 28. 
Power windows and locks. 
Transferable extondod war- 
ranty and manufacturer. Pur- 
sun Keyless Car Alarm, V6. 
19,000 miles. Asking $15,500. 
(708) 263-5389, Monday-Fri- 
day 6pm-9:30pm. Saturday- 
Sunday anytime. 

BUICK 1985 REGAL. White 
with Burgundy Interior. Runs 
Great! $1,000/best. Call after 
4:30pm or leave message. 
(708) 973-0149. 

BUICK 1987 CENTURY, 
V6, runs good, new exhaust 
and brakes, high miles; 
$2,100/best. (708) 356-5165 
after 5pm. 

CADILLAC 1985 SEVILLE, 

97,000 miles, fake convertlblle 
top, all power with leather In- 
terior, new tires, new brakes, 
body In good shape, air condi- 
tioning, am/lm stereo with cas- 
sette, $5,500. (70S) 546-8607 
aftor 5pm. 

CAMARO 1979 Z28, 350 

with 4 -speed "slap,' excellent 
shape, asking $5,000/best. 
(708) 567-5078. 

CHEVROLET 19B4 CAVA- 
LIEH, 4-door. 4-cyllnder air, 
needs some work. 
$4,0O0fbest. (70S) 740-3142. 

CHEVROLET CAMARO 

Z2B 1987, low mileage, very 
clean, $8,500. (708) 
872-3719, 7am-10am or after 
6pm. 

CHEVY 1973 MALIBU, 350 

cu.In. engine, good running, 
many new parts, reliable win- 
ter car, $600/best. (708) 
546-6803. 

CHEVY 1985 CELEBRITY. 
Some rust. Runs good. 
$1,500/best. (708) 566-5615. 

CHEVY 1986 SPECTRUM. 
Low miles, 5-speed, alarm, ex- 
cellent condition. $2,100rbest. 
(708) 688-2252 or (708) 623- 
6518 evenings. 

CHEVY 1992 CAVALIER 
Z24, black, very clean, air 
conditioning, power windows, 
power locks, cassette. (708) 
336-2036. 

CHEVY 1992 CAVALIER, 
22.000 miles,. 2-door, au- 
tomatic, air, 5-speed, excel- 
lent condition. $7,500. (708) 
336-9257. after 4:30pm. 

CHRYSLER 1983, 5th 

AVENUE. Leather Interior, 
power everything, a-cyllnder, 
103,000 miles. No dents, mini 
condition. $2,300/best, (708) 
740-7957. 

DODGE 1984 OMNI, 4- 
door hatchback. Very reliable 
and good running condition, 
$800. (708) 740-h$240 even- 
Ings only. 

DODGE 1985 OMNI GLH, 
black. Excellent condition. 
Must see to appreciate! 
S2,0OQVbest. (414) 694-2605. 

NISSAN STANZA 1980. 
New: battery, tires, exhaust 
and alternator. Dependable, 
120,000 miles. Needs dutch 
$500. (708) 497-3903. 

OLDS 1985 WAGON, runs 
well, $1,200/bost. (708) 
356-6536 after 5pm. 



BIKE, TOURING MIELE, 
20ln. frame, 10-spoed, excel- 
lent condition. $350/best. 

(414) 653-O890. 

MOUNTAIN BIKE, NISHIKI 
COLORADO, Shimano Sis 
conponents, 18-speed, good 
condition, ready to ride, $300. 
(708) 973-1218. 

SKATEBOARD 1/2 pipe. 
4ft. high x Bit. wide x 25lt. long, 
like new condition, 5350 /best. 
Adam (708) 949-7432. 



DODGE 1987 RAM, custom 
cap, custom tires. 

$2,8O0/best. (708) 973-1318. 

FIREBIRD 1991, Mops, 

loaded, excellent condition, - 
$9,500/bost. (414) 882-6516. 

FORD LTD 1986 CROWN 
VICTORIA, 4-door, one own- 
er, low mileage, light blue, vel- 
vet Interior, an the toys, like . 
now. SS.500. (708) 362-3200. 

FORD 1979 FAIRMONT 
FUTURA, 107,000 miles. 
Very good condition, new bat- 
tery, spark plugs. $1,100. 
(708) 662-7168. 

FORD 1982 THUNDER- 
BIRD, 250 straight 6. Many 
now parts, $900. (708) 223- 
8622. 

FORD 1986 ESCORT, 
black, 4-door, automatic, eco- 
nomical , needs minor repair, 
runs good, $775, (414) 
843-2892. 

FORD 1989 MUSTANG, 
5.0, everything power, In ex- 
cellent condition, 45,000 
miles. $6,500/best. (414) 
654-4492. 5302- 44th Ave., 
Kenosha. 

FORD 1992 F-1S0, 41.000 
miles, 5-speed. $9,300. Super 
condition. (414) 857-6964. 

HONDA 1990 ACCORD 
EX, 4-door, air, power wind- 
ows and locks, am/tm cas- 
sette, power sun-roof, 48k 
miles. One Owner, $10,000. 
(708) 223-6487. 

HONDA ACCORD LXI 
1988, 4-door, 5-speed, man- 
ual, sun-root, clean. 
$5,0O0.(7O6) 660-5684. 

HOT ROD, 1984 Olda Cut- 
lass S with Chevy 350, 30 
over Bore. 300 plus tip engine 
has less than 1,000 miles. 
TH350 Trans. Is under warran- 
ty Too much to list. Has new 
paint, needs hood. Very clean, 
no rusl. Spent over $7,500. 
Have receipts. $4,000/1lrm. 
(708)816-6034. 

LEXUS SC300, 

1992.BLACK w/tvory leather, 
sun root, CD, fully loaded. 14k 
miles. Excellent Condition. 
$29,500.(708) 546-1340. 

LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 
1980 MARK VI, less than 
71,000 miles, good condition, 
asking $3,400. (708) 
587-7902. 

LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 
1988, air, cruise, sun root, 
leather Interior. 64,000 miles. 
Excellent condition. (708) 
336-2357. 

LINCOLN TOWNE CAR 
1984, tuN power, mint, 70.000 
miles. S5,500/besl, (708) 
587-4355. 

MERCURY 1987 SABLE 
WAGON, am/lm cassette, all 
power, air conditioning, now 
brakes, 115k highway miles, 
good condnion. $2,950.(708) 
223-5873. 

MUSTANG 1967, from Ha- 
waii. Must Soil!. No rust. Excel- 
lent condition. Must see to ap- 
preciate! $3,500/best. (708) 
973-1316. 

MUSTANG 1986 GT, 5.0, 
grey, Sspeed, power steer- 
ing, power brakes, 58,000 
miles, $4,500. (708) 
973-1917. 

NISSAN 19B7 200SX-XE, 
4-cyllnder, 5-speed, power 
steering, power brakes, air, tilt 
cruiser, am/tm. High highway 
miles. Sl.600/best. (708) 
5B7-1693. 

PONTIAC SUNBIRD SE 
COUPE 1992, 6-cyllnder, 
sport package, tinted wind- 
ows, alarm, 52,000 miles, 
$7800 or best oiler. (414) 
657-1244 




SERVE EVERYONE 



OLDS 1990 CUTLASS SU- 
PREME, automatic, full pow- 
er, air, 4-door, low. mileage 
$7,000. (708) 356-0840 alter 
7pm. 

OMNI GLH TURBO 1985, 
good condition, 120k, Iota ot 
new parts, rebuilt trans, spd 
shifter, have receipts for eve- 
rylhlngt FASTI 5.0 EATERI 
$2,000/best (708) 918-8182 
after 4PM. 

PONTIAC 1989 GRAND 
PRIX SE, loaded, power every-' 
thing. Bra inducted, excellent 
condition. $6,900/best. (414) 
843-2345. " 

SCIROCCO 1981 bull! by 
Callaway, turbo system, 
S 1,800. Bulck 1965 Skylark, 
low miles $2,000/bost. (708) 
223-9468. ■ 

TOYOTA 1982 CELICA, 
excellent condition Inside & 
out, runs great, very reliable, 
Air, 5-speed, low mileage, 
$1,900.(708)735-1801. 

TOYOTA 1985 CELICA 
GT. Hatchback, red, sun- 
roof, automatic, 88k, excellent 
condition. Am/tm cassette, 
power windows, locks, steer- 
ing, cruise, tilt. 53,000/best. 
(708) 336-91 1 1 . Leave mes- 
sage. 



• U.C. Us Rhst • 




IT TAKES! 

# More $$ for ^ 
your trade, etc. 

OLDSMOBILES 
HYUNDAIS 

94's&95's 

Demo Program A Edge Cars 
*B5 Used Cars In Stock * 

Marquardt 



&*■ 



On Rt. 41 at 

Washington St., East exit 

Gurnee, IL 

• (708)249-1300* 



810 



Classic/Antique Cars 



1967 MUSTANG, New 289 
high performance. Needs little 
body work. Asking $1,600. 
(708) 872-0523. 

ATTENTION VW BUG 
LOVERS! Fall collection sale, 
have 1966, 1975, 1960, 1964. 
1966 and 1975- stock vehlde, 
running condition. 1960-semt- 
custom, 1964 -full custom, na- 
tional show winner. 1984 GTI- 
needs some work, excellent 
body condition. (815) 
344-0626 leave message. 

FORD 1963 FAIRLANE 
500 SPORT COUPE, V8, 
automatic, power steering. 
S1,500/tirm. (708) 526-6577. 



814 



Service & Parts 



CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 
BODIES.* Factory-new, guar- 
anteed from $1,300. Doors 
from $89. Fenders Irom $50. 
Beds Irom $600. Bedllners 
$169. Bumpers, grills, repair 
panels, paints, abrasives, 
windshields, radiators. Deltv- 
ery. Mark's (217) 824-6184. 




CHEVY 1990 C SERIES 
CONVERSION VAN. Always 
garaged. This Is a must to see. 
Has ail the toys! 350 VS. 4- 
speed automatic, always 
maintained. Shop around, 
then call tor appointment. No 
disappointments hero! 62K. 
511,200.(708)249-0031. 

DODGE RAM CONVER- 
SION VAN 1992, V8, 
wheelchair accessible, au- 
tomatic wheelchair lift (or 1 
person to handle alone 
$25,250ybest (414) 654-0559 
(414)654-8312. 

PLYMOUTH 1985 VOYAG- 
ER, loaded, air, extra clean, 
S3.200rbost. (708) 223-6567. 




CLASSIFIED UIceUncI Newspapers SepTcmbeR 70, 1 994 



828 



vcl 



834 


Trucks/Trallcrs 



844 



Motorcycles 



844 


Motorcycles 



844 



Motorcycles 



Four Med Drive 
Jeeps 



828 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps 



FOHD 1984 BRONCO II, 
now transmission, now mul- 
itore, runs great, needs minor 
body work, $2,500. Ask for 
Tim (708)356-9189. 



GMC JIMMY SLE 1992, 
fully loaded. Asking $18,250 or 
bost otter (414) 654-0559 
(414)654-8312. 

JEEP COMANCHE 1990, 
4i:4. custom wheels, top, 
nm/lm CD, $7,900. (708) 
54B-391B 



FOHD 1983 truck with 3- 
sldod cap. Great condition, 
runs good, air, am/lm cas* 
setto. $2,000/nogotlable. 
{815)344-6918. 




DIRT BIKE 1993 SUZUKI 
JR50. groat first blko, excel- 
lent condition, $750. (414) 
843-4173. 

MINT CONDITION. 1979, 
850 GS Pressor Suzuki motor- 
cycle. Includes atl accesso- 
ries, helmets, storage cover 
and more! Only 25,000 origi- 
nal mites. A Must Sool. Only 
$1,500. Call (708)265-0246 
alter 5:30pm. 



FOR SALE 19B0 YAMAHA 
XSII SPECIAL, votier lairing 
and hard bags, stereo, Wrkor 
header, some chromo, rebuilt 
10,000 miles ago. $1,200. 
1985 ENT1CER 340; $700. 
Frod (708) 546-3928. 

MOTORCYCLE 1994 Mag- 
na, V4, 750cc, lots ol chromo, 
lemon yellow. Must sell duo to 
financial problems. Will make 
deal. (708) 546-5420 Scott. 



MOTORCYCLE 1991 KA- 
WASAKI 454 LIMITED. 
Black and chromo, loss than 
300 miles, asking $2,75oybost. 
(708) 526-^984. 

MOTORCYCLE 1992 SU- 
ZUKI DR350, like new condi- 
tion, low miles. Purchased 
new In 1993. $2,500. (414) 
843-4173. 

1981 YAMAHA, 400cc road 
blko. Woods baltery, $500. 
(708) 497-4135., atler 4pm. 




HONDA 1986 RM-250 
ATV, 4-whoelor. Vory good 
condition. $2,000. (414) 
052-0155., 



848 



Wanted To Buy 



DON'T LET ME FREEZEll I 
nood a soft top tor a 1987 
Joop Wrangler. Must bo rea- 
sonably priced and tn good 
condition. (708)395-0415; 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



TO PLACE 
YOUR AD HERE 
CALL _ 

708-223-8161 



isnv 



-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 




Howe Studio 

Award-winning photographer ready 

to capture your special moments for 

Wedding, Portrait, Glamour & Portfolios. 

Call (708) 360-9209 
for an appointment 

GURNEE__ 



SEAMLESS ALUMINUM GUTTERS, , 
ALUMINUM SIDING, TRIM, SOFFIT, FASCIA 

J.B. HOME EXTERIORS 

SENIORS CITIZENS 90 DAYS SAME AS CASH 
INSURED 22 COLORS FREE ESTIMATES 

FAMILY OWNED 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE LOCAL REFERENCES 
JOHNGEBERT LEAVE MESSAGE AT (708) 587-8772 



FANTASTIC 
FIREWOOD 

2 yr. old Seasoned Hardwood. 

Oak, Maple, Ash, Chary. 

$59.00 per face Cord. 

(1/3 of full Cord) 

Free Stacking & Delivery. 

"Buy the wood that's 
guaranteed to burn" 

(708) 546-3613 



Adult & Pediatric Allergy 




DR. DANIEL YAMSHON 




'ASTHMA 
•HAY FEVER 



HIVES 
HEADACHES 



•ECZEMA 
•FOOD ALLERGY 



FREE ALLERGY SCREENING 



i| AlpS ? SB Phy .icitnt Buffalo Grovrf ftound Uke Beach 
IS S. Old Hand Road . 150 Half Day Rd. 2 SKlSK!,? 1 ' 
I (708)550-3300 (708) 91 3-0300 . (708)546-5800 
24 Hour Am. Service (312) 889-8729 



Protect Now 

Before Winter 

Weather 

Damage! 



t^-y.v. 



H V 



•*^5"»-jr~««"v 



3 



**-« 



WE SEAL DRIVEWAYS 



...and small parking lots 

•Seal Coating -Patchwork •Crack Filling 

Protect and Preserve • Reasonable rates. Call for a FREE estimate 

(708) 740-4051 or (70S) 366-1911 ~~^" 

AMERICAN.SEALCOATING BY GEORGE 



irzrm 



M 




Duraclean 

Rated best by 
Independent tests 



Carpet & 
Furniture 
Cleaning 

CALL 
TODAY! 




Get It DONE before winter! 
Call 

The Contractors Network 

Hundreds of Contractors checked-out 
and ready to work for you! 

FINDERSsm 

(708) 548-3463 

Referrals are FREE! 



K 



W.A. SOD FARM 

Wisconsin Grown & Inspected 

#1 Kentucky Bluegrass Blended Sod 

Peat or Mineral 

Forklift Delivered 



Phoati <414)M5-2725 
FAX:<4M)lf*-74M 




HOME IMPROVEMENT \ 

Kitchens • Baths • Decks 
Room Additions 

NO JOB TOO SMALL 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(708) 526-3976 



587-2356 

Duraclean 

specialists 




Duraclean'a 

"Gold Standard of Excellence" 

for over 60 yeara 



te 



LEAJFBLAD GRADING 
& CONCRETE 

•Backhoe & Bobcat Excavation 
•Gravel Driveways 
•Landscaping & Decorative 
Rock Construction 
•Tree Planing & Removal 
•Lot Clearing 
•Drain Tiles -Truck Hauling 

CONCRETE 

•Removal 'Installation 
Fully Insured 
708-356-3050 

J no |ob too largt to Mtlmttt or loo small to tpprtclatt 



■Vl:1 



;.J 



If you love to cook/ 

hate to cook/ 

or just ntid m* idiot* stare a 

ifitfi your friondil 
, CALL FOR DETAILS 

<Jtt>76HH« 



f BUYING 

I Aluminum Cans 

*COPPER 'BRASS 
*AUTO RADIATORS 
*LEAD 'ALUMINUM 

A-1 RECYCLING 

96 Honing Rd., Fox Lake.lL 

(708) 587-0788 

-or- 

1000 Rand Rd(Rt. 12), Unit 212 
Wauconda, IL 

(708) 526-0760 

HOURS: 

Mon.-Frt. 

9 a.m.-5 p.m. 

Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 

L : Closed 12-12:30 



HOME TYHST LOOKING 
FOR ADDITIONAL WORK 

MASS MAILINGS: 

Have a letter that needs to be 

sent to everyone? I have the 

I computer set-up. 2 day turnaround | 

depending on volume. Have 

additional requests, just askl 



CALL BRENDA AT 
414-248-1589 



SCHNEIDER 
BUILDERS 

Addition *KK I Bath remodeled 

Ganget •Dorrmn 

'Handyman Senrka 'Fret Deiigra 
•Ctutom Built Dedu and Gazebo 

FREE Estimates 
CaU Toby at 

(798)546-4311 



FREE SERVICE 



CONTRACTOR REFERRALS FOR ANY CONSTRUCTION NEED: 

• Heating/Air ♦ Remodels 

• Kitchens • Roofing 

• Landscape • Siding 



• Additions 

• Basements 

• Bathrooms 



• Decks 
Electrical 



Painting 
• Plumbing 



Windows 
• And Mere... 



» UeCineal • riuiliuniy - r 

Celt Homeowner's Referral Service, Inc. for Qualify Contractors you can Count On\ 




Contractors referred are: 

fZAdequately Licensed; Insured; Reputable; 

BRrferenced; tS EataWWied for Five Yeer* 



lluiiu'ouiii'rs HHorrjl Si'r\U'«. Inr. 
1-80O-9(i-KrrrR 1-800-967-3337 



PRCflllCR 

pence co. 

(708) 933-0338 

Custom Cedar • Chain Link 
Free Estimates 



i n i iiiiui i immi i i i i ii i i iii i 



DUNCAN 
PAINTING 

Jrrtenon/Exteriws • FREE ESTIMATES 

Insured Quality Work 

References - Top Line Material 

WE DO OUR OWN WORK 

Call 
(708)566-1002 



•Driveways 

•ResurFacing 
•Repairs 
•Parking Lots 
•Seal Coating 

Residential Specialists 
Bonded and Insured 

FREE ESTIMATES 
(198) 149-9858 
(815)344-8419 



immmm .i mm.mmn 




. SSMVING YOU* PAINTING 
AND DECORATING NEEDS. 

Complete Intorior/Eiterior 
Also Munli^Dutom Wodt 
Quality Woric ■ Neatly Done 

FREE Estimates 

AffordabU Prka 

"Have the job done warrl" 

Call (708) 223-2656 

24 Hr. Mtssag* 



4A4i444AAAAA«ii4ilAAI44« 

4 
4 



LAWNWORKS 



ITS THAT TIME OF YEAR - FALL CLEANUP 

Retainer Walls • Boulder • Timber • Flagstone 



»vv- 



4 

4 
A 
A 
A 
4 
4 NO JOB TOO SMALL 



Fall Planting 
Your choice of 
shrubs or trees 




•Walkways or Patios 
Brick or Flagstone 

• Reasonable Rates 
Call Dennis Adams 

708-546-3231 



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A *4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 



SepTCfttbtM JO, 1994 UblANd NEWspApcits CLASSIFIED 




. 



***************** 

* HAIR CUTS by J 

J FREDDIE'S II * 

* "Your Neighborhood J 

* i BarborShop" J 

* . . Comer 0/ .Washington + 

* & Lewis, WauJtegan J 

* 6:3<tam - 5:00pm 'nies.-FrldBy J' 

* . 8:30am - 3:00pm Saturday J 

* (708)249-2264 

J •Fred H/ouseJc ^ 

7 Proprietor . ^ 

£ 5 minutes from Great America * 
***************** 



TO 



T & C METAL CO. 

Wo recycle aluminum cans! 

Wo also buy • Insulated WIro 

•Copper •Brass -Load •Stainless 

•Aluminum Siding •Batteries •Zinc 
•Auto Radiators •Catalytic Converters 



Buyer* of non-ferrous metal*. 
Industrial account* welcome. 



378 Prairie St. 
Crystal Lake, IL 



u 



FLOORS U WALK ON, inc. 



615-459-4445 



Hours: Mon.-Frl. 8-5; Sat. 3-1 



1 Blocks, of Hwy. 176 
BeNnd J & L Gas Station 



Cerpeu • Hardwood • Ceramic • Vinyl 
Kitchen A Bathroom Remodeling 

RatidvittmX A Co.nmmrcUl Ixaftlmlitm 

ALL WORK ClJAJtANIfXD 

'bee Estimates 
(708) 356-2500 
(708)310-5220 




DONrWROWAWAYl 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING ITTV OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS, 
FOR REPAIRS. 

| WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 

33261 N. Highway 45 

WHdwood, IL 60030 

(708) 223-8691 




A 

A 
A 
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CW LANDSCAPE CO. INC. 

LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS & CONTRACTORS 
Serving Lakf County Since 1960 
•Computer Design •Seeding 
•Flagstone Patios -Sodding 
•Stone Walls -Planting 
•Texture Gardens •Grading 

(708)746-8953 



A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

.A 

A 

A 

A 

A. 

A 



W 



AAAAAAAAAAAAAA 



MAID IN AMERICA 



CLEANING SERVICE 

Serving most \oj the near and far suburbs for over 23 years, 

Dmly-Weekly-Bi-Wttkly and Monthly rate Available 

• Free Estimates • Gift Certificates Available 

We DO Windows • Trained, Bonded, Insured 

and English Speaking Staff" 

Phone (708) 546-2588 • Fax (708) 546-2601 

1427 Cedar Lake Road 

Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 




f Discover 
Renting 

I You can do it yourself 

(708) 740-8800 

. Round Lake Park 

($) 

Ram Rental 





AURSEN & 
LACKMAN<b 

Window & Door Replacement 

Service You Can Trust 
_ Free Estimates 

Depend On! 




(708) 838-5300 



ALUMINUM & 
VINYL SIDING 

Softit A Fascia 
Window and Wood Trim 

Vinyl R-rU.^mwil V*/ui-l- v.'. 

',7' -k CuM^inl"""-"! 

Iir.nt^'l Pm*6 E'.tirn.iU*'. 

^ EAGLE SIDING CO. 
(708) 526-7222 




: Fully 1«p; 

Oua^l&kwtth Written 



BEEPERS!! 



Sales A Service 

MOTOROLA 
BRAVO 





• FrMp«Hv«fy : 

• Al Connect Charge* ; 

• On* Month Mrurna? Morel caff 

Action Beeper Corp. 
54*9690 

(WM)47t>-TSM RwaidlafcaBesch 



. 



•CONCRETE DRIVEWAYS 

^GARAGE SLABS 

^EXPOSED AGGREGATE PATIOS 

"WOOD DECKS 

GURNEE QUAMW 
CONST. CO., INC. 

^LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED* | 
. (708) 627*2969 
(708) 360-0481 





These high quality shirts feature 50%/50% Heavyweight 
Jersey Knit, taped high crew neck, hemmed short 
sleeves, and full cut. 

NO ART OR SCREEN CHARGES ON 48 OR MORE SHIRTS 

1 44 or more with your 1 -color Imprint 

WHITE - $5.60 each COLORS - $6.44 each 

ITEMS and IDEAS (708) 438-7488 



LANDSCAPING SPECIALIST 

RESEED, PLANT TREES & 

SHRUBS FOR A 

BEAUTIFUL SPRING 

(wood decks & brick patios, too) 

BUDGET 
LANDSCAPING 

PATIOS & 

DESIGNER 

DECKS 

(708) 838-2101 




Let Us Do Your Typing, 
Inventory, Bookkeeping, Etc. 

FULL OR PART TIME 
. May we meet with you 
and talk over your needs? 

We think we ecu be of assistance 

The Business Puce 

Virginia Johnson 

P.O. Box 27, Round Lake, IL 60073-0027 

(708)546-4510 



Fine 



Homes 




WICK'S TOPSOIL 



4 YDS; 
6 YDS. 
8 YDS. 
14 YDS. 



$65.00 
$75.00 
$85.00 
$115.00 



by 

Paul Zasadil 

•New Homos \ •Renovations 
•Additions •Carpentry 

(708)566-4724 



Local Delivery 

Out of Area Xtra Del Chg. 

(708) 367-6566 

(815) 344-7928 



■aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaasaaag 



***************** 

$* Bum's feMSuHHt* 
JStoiaoi Spiciii •* 

J Any size boat trailer -or- * 
X 2 snowmobiles on trailer * 
* *2B.OO por ■»•«•* * 



* 
(708} 8*7-0100 * 

IOW RATES! * 

ii * 



SHAVINGS 

1 Bale or 1,000 

Cash & Garry 

112 mile north State Line Rd. 

East of Hwy. 45 on County Trunk CJ 

HQRT0N BROS. 

Bristol, Wl 
(414)857-2525 

Mon. - Fri. 8-5, Sat. 8-3 




Tupperware 



LOTS OF NEW ITEMS 



a 

a 
a 
a 
a 

1-NEW FALL CATALOQ- 

a 
a 
g Call to request a catalog, 

g place an order or 

a date a party, 

a Please call Phaedra Weiler 

a 
a 
a 



■aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaai 




* 
* 
* 
* 

* Winn* iRRnwMi: * 

* $12.00 per fit. 20' or under * 

* $13.00 per tit. 2V or over * 

* Cars, RVs, etc. * 
***************** 

d PSYCHIC CARD READING 

. ^ 6y Lee 9i arris 

,-s, Cards, Palms, Character Readings, 

<s> Advice on All Problems of life Such As Love, Marriage, 
(Z Business, Etc. Specializing in Reuniting Loved Ones, 
VI Removing Stumbling Blocks 

* 708/202-0831 

& ALSO AVAILABLE FOB PARTIES 



HOME 
REMODELING & 
IMPROVEMENT 

All Phases 
, Reasonable Rates 

FREE ESTIMATES 
(708)587-9729 



3? 



&BJS2ZLJ m*(&Mm*wm**m^ 




1 



S 







'ho momm, «sr. mm «o HMim»G v i^ 

htisnatariOws- Mamas anb mo** 
call worn additional services offered 
WE THE PEOPLE BUSINESS CENTER . 
V (708) 5 48-1300 X 



BORSIC ft SON! 
LANDSCAPING j 

Landscape Contractors & j 
Maintenance 
Slit Seeding - CompJefe Renovation | 

•Seeding •Sodding j 
•Trees •Shrubs 
•Topsoil •Woodchips 
TREE ESTIMATES 

(708)662-3134 



!G,Si* Service 

Carpentry • Electrical 
Plumbing 

All phases of home 
remodeling & repair 

FREE ESTIMATES 

1703) 537-09371 



MAINTENANCE 

No Job Too Small. I'll Do It AIL 
•Remodeling 

Kitchen's, Bathrooms & Rec Rooms 

•Painting And Wallpapering 
•Flooring 

(All Types) 

•Siding Ind Rooting 
•Carpentry 

Decks & Additions 

ill Work Very Well Done 

Flit llfiMAfil, CALL 
(4U1S3M43V 



— 




SPORTS/LEISURE UkcM Newspapers SepTEMbcn 70, 1994 



Bears lone unbeaten; Pats cruise in North 




Stevenson 28, Warren 
Stevenson is back in the North 
Suburban Conference and play- 
off pictures with the romp over 
Warren, Kyle Brandt and Robert 
Llszka scored two touchdowns 
running each in the first half, 
Stevenson (3-2, 3-1) gained 387 
yards. 

Libertyvillc 26, Fenton 10 
Libertyvillc's Richie Kronn 
starred in his first varsity game, 
rushing for 72 yards including a 
33-yd. touchdown. He also 
returned a punt for 29 yards. 
Quarterback Chris Fulbright 
completed a 3-yd. TD pass after 
fumbling the bail and slipping. 
Posting a 4-1 NSC record, the 



Wildcats share the conference 
lead with North Chicago. 

Mundeleln 33, Lake Forest 9 
Running back Djorn Johnson 
racked up 206 yards on the 
ground to continue his rushing 
onslaught in the NSC. Johnson 
also connected with Israel 
Gonzales for a 31-yd, TD flea- 
flicker. Mundclein will be going 
for three wins in row at Warren 
Saturday. 

Rockford Boylan 42, Antioch 13 
Antioch kept the game close mid- 
way through the third quarter 
only trailing 13-8, but Rockford 
proved why they are the No. 1 
team in the state by coming up 



with 29 unanswered points In the scored on a 16-yard run and Luke 

second half. Antioch running Chbrazy tallied from 1 yard out as 

back Brad Rubash caught a 53-yd. Carmcl Improved to 2-3, 1-2 East 

TD pass from Walter Martens. Suburban Catholic Conference. 



Round Lake 37, Johnsburg 
Ray Mucllemann scored three 
touchdowns and Kevin Burris 
two as the Panthers reached the 
victory column for the first time. 
Round Lake (1-3) scored on two 
4-yard runs by Mucllemann, a 4- 
yard run by Kevin Burris and a 
22-yard run by Burris. Joseph 
Miller had a 1-yard run. 

Carmel 13, Benet 
A strong ground game led Carmel 
to the win after three losses. Nick 
Ycager, who ran for 93 yards, 



Grayslake 20, Wauconda 6 
The Rams have won two of their 
last three games. Jeff Neutzman 
scored twice and Cris Perham once 
as the Rams improved to 2-3. They 
share first place in the Northwest 
Suburban Conference with Round 
Lake and Marian Central. 

Marian Central 40, Grant 15 
Dave Stone and David Jakstas 
scored running touchdowns but 
it was not nearly enough for the 
defending (0-5, 0-1) NWSC 
champs. Jason Liska, three 



touchdowns, keyed the powerful 
Hurricanes (5-0, 1-0). 

Richmond 21, 

Genoa-Kingston 7 
The Rockets (2-3, 1-0) end a three- 
game losing streak and start on the ( 
right . note in the Big Eight 
Conference Red Division; Greg 
Regincr, Tony Scacco and Lucas 
Dchmlow scored touchdowns. 

Lake Zurich 35, Jacobs 14 
Lake Zurich running back Mike 
Stumpp rushed for 211 yards and 
scored three TDs. His touchdown 
runs went for 1yd., 80 yds and 52.', 
The Bears' remain undefeated 
overall (5-0) and in the Fox Valley 
Conference (3-0). 



SPORTS/LEISURE 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



THIS WEEK 

Rain delay 

Weather dampens 

championships 

PAGEC57 

Big loss 

Knights shut-out 
look to recoup 
PAGE C18 



On U roll 

Corsairs not distracted 
by injuries 
PAGE C59 




'I 



t 

Yugoslav from Round Lake wins karate title 



runners 
aim to trim 
race times 

College of Lake County's 
men's and women's cross 
% country runners will be look- 
ing to improve times at the 
Milwaukee Area Technical 
£ College invite Oct, 1, 

"We have some pretty 
dedicated runners who arc 
fun to work with," Coach 
Karen Graham said. 

The Lancers are not the 
power they once were, not 
. claiming a title in three 
invites.';' /The ; teams still has 
: ; lofty goals. 'We arc still going 
for the conference champi- 
f| onship and^ striving . for 
nationals," Graham said. 
C Sophomores Jeff Buumann 
I from Palatine, Rick Quiglcy 
i from Waukegan and Rob 
^Hannon of Antioch lead the 
lumen's I team. Freshmen are 
H'Rob /Rung' from Warren ': 
^TriwnsbJp i High School, Mik«K 
$ Reavls*br Highland Park and 1 " 
§BriatfLafrd of WaukcgaiiL % :g&£ 
.Glrlsr are -all ;freshmen:f 
• fTdnl Welzen of Round Lake, 
^ Jennifer Carlson of 
IlfJLIbert^wUe, and Renee 

TessrnajifbfiGraysIa^ 
« L^mcers. Wt|11 be hosting their 
1 own invitational Oct. 8. ? <^v 



KEVIN HANRAHAN _ 

Staff Reporter 

Oddly enough, Ncnad 
Brakocevic came from Yugoslavia 
to the United States to compete 
in karate. 

"I came to the United States 
to compete in bigger tourna- 
ments. 1 like (the) better competi- 
tion here," he says in broken 
English. 

And he has certainly picked it 
up well — karate, that is — 
because he fought his way to 
being the national karate cham- 
pion and was awarded an All- 
American of the USA Karate 
Federation, which is the national 
governing body for karate. 

He earned a gold medal in spar- 
ring and a bronze medal in forms 
during the national championships 
in Jacksonville, Fla. To qualify for 
the national competition, 
Brakocevic had to compete in the 
Atlantic League Regional, where 
earned a silver medal in sparring 
and a bronze medal in forms. 

Brakocevic arrived to the 
i United States only two years ago 
and has since reached local, 
regional and national stardom in 
karate. 

The 17-year-old is now a 
senior at Round Lake High 
School, where he was named to 
the junior homecoming court last 
year and is a varsity soccer player 
for the Panthers. He said one of 
his biggest obstacles since com- 
ing here is learning English. 

Since arriving to the United 
States, Brakocevic has won 13 
medals, two trophies, and 
numerous patches, plaques and 
awards in karate. Under the guid- 
ance of his mentor Master John 



Townslcy, Brakocevic trains at 
USA Karate in Libertyvillc and 
teaches there as well. 

"Karate is another world for 
me. I enjoy it," Brakocevic. 

His passion for karate came 
approximately three years ago. 
While at home in Belgrade, 
Yugoslavia, he became sick and 
was lying in bed. His brother 
Vejjko brought home a video for 
him to watch while in bed. 

As it turned out, Brakocevic 
fell in love with Jean-Claude Van 
Damme 's movie, "The 

Kickboxer." After that, "I started 
practicing everyday." 

He became interested in com- 
peting in this country after visiting 
his grandfather, Jclenko, who lives 
in Round Lake Beach. When he 
decided to come here, he said his 
friends said he would grow tired of 
America and return shortly. 

"My friends back home don't 
believe all the medals I have 
won," he says with a proud grin. 
He even earned the Presidential 
Sports Award signed by President 
Bill Clinton and has bis picture 
plastered on the cover of a 
national karate magazine. 

His mother, Branka, didn't 
even believe him about all of his 
accolades until she saw him win 
the national championship. "It 
meant a lot to me for my mother 
to sec me compete in the cham- 
pionships," he said. 

Now, Brakocevic is the talk of 
Belgrade. 

But Brakocevic intends to 
remain in this country. He is 
planning on attending the 
College of Lake County and wants 
to play soccer and continue to 
compete in karate. He was disap- 




Nenod Brakocevic at the Allantte League Chmptonshlp In Akron, Ohio. 



pointed to learn that only five 
American colleges compete in 
karate at the collegiate level. 

"I hope to make karate more 
popular in colleges," said 
Brakocevic. 

He said his heart will always 
be with karate, and the first thing 
he teaches his young karate stu- 
dents is the "courtesy about the 
sport (and) trying to be the best 
you can be." 



In the meantime, the young 
Yugoslavian is trying to cope with 
the pressures of being an 
American teen-ager between 
school, soccer practice, karate 
training and teaching. He is also 
working hard with the USA 
Karate Federation in trying to 
make karate an Olympic sport. 

Said his grandfather, Jclenko, 
"He loves to be the champion for 
the United States.". 






Warhawk coach hits Zion 



STEVE PETERSON 



. Staff Reporter 

Bill King is criticizing the de- 
cision by Zion-Bcnton High 
School not to play North Chicago 

**ffrgri in future athletic contests. 
: "It puts an unnecessary fear in 
people's minds. The decision not 
to play us is short-sighted," 
Coach King said. 

An altercation between the 
two teams took place following 
North Chicago's 22-17 win Satur- 
day. A resolution of the issue was 



possible as, by coincidence, North 
Suburban Conference principals 
met Wednesday. 

"We were at least a hallway 
away from the home lockerroom. 
Why were they (Zion players) al- 
lowed to come down the hallway 
and initiate a fight?," Coach King 
stated. "The participation of one 
of the Zion coaches in the fracas 
was also uncalled for. Unless I get 
an OK from my superior, I will not 
say who it was." 

Efforts to reach Gary Fields, 



games 



Zion superintendent, were un- He said the decision limits the 

successful before deadline; chances of participation for ath- 

King, in his second, week of letes. 
head coaching position due to a North Chicago coaches re- 
certification question of former ceived what they believe to be a 
North Chicago head coach Rod- cold shoulder before the game 
ney Hampton, pointed to how his with traditional rivals. "I was five 
team conducted itself following a yards away from Rich Petersen 
31-8 loss to Antioch the week (Zion head coach) arid lie never 
before. shook my hand. The only people 

"We got our butts whipped, who did was the athletic director 

but our kids did not initiate any and track coach," King said, 

fights. We licked our wounds and King had to watch the second half 

went on," Coach King said. See WAR HAWKS page C39 



I 









ScpttMbeii 70, 1 994 UIceIancJ Newspapers SPORTS/LEISURE 




Mother Nature delays four Wilmot championships 



MICHAEL H.' BABICZ ■■'■><» 
Correspondent 

Break out the antacids and 
sleeping pills as Mother Nature 
decided it will be another week 
before the last four of Toft Auto 
Racing's, 1994 Wilmot Speedway 
Champions are decided. 

The. Annual Night of 
Championships is rescheduled 
for Saturday, Oct. 1 . Race t i m e is 7 
p.m. Three days of rains forced 
the postponement of the season 
championship main events 
planned for Sept. 24. 

This marks' Wil mot's ninth 
rainout. The features will deter- 
mine the 1994 Kings of Wilmot In 
the sprints,' modifleds, sportsman 



and mini-sprints. 

Muskego's Dick Colhum holds 
, a 10-polnt advantage over runner- 
up Allen Winker of Kenosha, Wis. 

Kenosha's Dennis Spitz leads 
the modified standings by 22 
points over fellow Kcnoshan 
Jimmy Uttcch, Jr., and leads by 22.; 

John Pochler of Libcrtyvillc is 
14 points up on a fast finishing 
Scott Kuxhousc of Antioch. 

In the mini-sprints, second- 
year competitor Steve Moulis of 
Fox Lake is in front of defending 
champion Scott Sip pel of Elkhart 
Lake, Wis., by 16 points. Moulis is 
on top of the field despite having 
not won a feature event. 

Lorraine Miles of UbcrtyvUle 



has become the first "queen" of 
Wilmot Speedway as she clinched 
the street stock Dudwclscr Racing 
Scries title becoming the first 
female regular season champion 
in the track's 41-ycar history. 

Defending, champion . Roy 
Morrison of Antioch will repeat as 
he has sewed up the mini-modi- 
fied title. 

"This rainout will certainly 
add to an already exciting night of 
championship racing," said pro- 



moter Ray Toft "We've had clos- 
er individual championships 
before, but never this many divi- 
sions all to be decided in the final 
feature events. 

"We are keeping with our cus- 
tom of not raising the grandstand 
admission for the final special 
night," Toft continued. "If s our 
way of thanking the fans and 
allowing them to sec. our 'super 
bowl' at regular season prices." 

To close out the season for 



"Wisconsin's Clay Center of 
Speed," all six divisions will com- 
pete In season championship fea- 
tures and feature challenges. In 
addition, there .arc the ■ 23rd 
Annual Collls A. .Pearson 
Memorial Modified Race, along 
with the Bcinc Excavating Sprint 
and J&L Oil Modified Shoo touts. 
For Wilmot Speedway Infor- 
mation, phone the 24-hour race- 
lines (414)662-2446 or«38-RACE ( 
or track office at (414)062-2458. . ; 



— WilivioT ResuIts 



Official Toft Auto 

Racing's Wilmot Speedway 

1994 Budwelser Racing Series 

Official Point Standings 

As of Sept. 24 

Sprints 

1. DlckColburn (9)-l,100; 2. Allen 
Winker (10w)-1.170; 3. Dennis Spitz 
(41)-1,149; 4. Todd Daun {19)-1,101; 
5. Dave Bliss (39) -1,053; 6. Gary Zobcl 
(Z93)-976; 7. Tim Cox (40)-950; 8. Tim 
Amnion (U-840; 9. Kurt Davis (6K)- 
B21; 10. Kris Spitz (4KJ-802. 

Bicnc Excavating Sprint Dash 
(Final) 

1. Dick Colbum (9)-6G; 2. Dennis 
Spitz (41J-48; 3. Allen Winker (10w)- 
42; 4. Todd Daun (19J-40; 5. Tim 
Amnion (1) -26; 6. Tim Cox (40)-24; 7. 
Kurt Davis (6K)-20; 7. (tied) Dave Bliss 
i(39)-20;9. Mike Frost (88)-18; 10. Gary 
Zobcl (Z93J-16. 

Modifleds 

1. Dennis Spitz (4D-1.367; 2. 
^imray^lJUech, Jr. (12)-1,345; 3. Gary 
Dye (4)-lT239; 4. Todd Hcpfner (28)- 
1,043; 5. Lenny Ostrowski, Jr. (B3)- 
1,021; 6. Tim Cox (40) -949; 7. Craig 
Lager (18J-937; 8. Fred Zack (92J-886; 
9. Larry Vandervcrc (14) -830; 10. Jerry 
Doles (55J-B13. 

J&L Oil Modified Dash (Final) 

1. Jimmy Uttech, Jr. (12)-90; 2. 
Dennis Spitz (41) -70; 3. Fred Zack 
(92)-60; 4. Lenny Ostrowski, Jr. (83)- 
44; 5. Tim Cox (40J-24; 6. Gary Dye 
(4)-22; 7. Todd Hcpfner (28) -10; 8. 



Allen Winker (10w)-8; 8. (tied) Jerry 
Doles (55)-8; 10. Keith Olscn (30)-G; 
10. (tied) Joe Pal mis a no (16) -6. 
Mint-Sprints 

1. Steve Moulis (1M) -754; 2. Scott 
Sipcl (5s)-736; 3. Steve Rcldcl, Jr. (4R)- 
576; 4. Matt Roebuck (10)-5G9; 5. 
Romy Baus (74}-530; 6. Tony Dcieso 
(78)-528; 7. Kal McNulty (14J-440; 8. 
Doug Addison (15J-444; 9. Patrick 
Haynes (5)-427; 9. (tied) Glen 
Isaacson (B2J-427. 

Mini-Mods 

1. Roy Morrison (3)-G34; 2. Dr. 
Ken Johnson (2) -565; 3. Hcrmic 
Schultz (71J-560; 4. Duck Wack (1)- 
556; 5. Jim Sullivan (91) -502; 6. Lisa 
Hcywood (99} -490; 7. Jim Morrison 
(J24)-476; 8. Tommy Sexton (7) -466; 
9. Rich Musgravc (2D-428; 10. Phil 
Schultz (17J-426. 

Street Stocks 

1. Lorraine Miles (23)-874; 2 Lary 
Donat (18)-810; 3. Mike Waterman 
(77J-736; 4. John Janssen (1D-700; 5. 
John Fahl (74)-670; 6. Ncal 
Ostergaaid (76)-590;.7Jlandy Wetzel 
(28J-492; 8. Eric Allen (88J-470; 9. 
Tom Donat (30J-452; 10. Larry 
Marshall (38)-412. 

Sportsman 

1. John Poehler (23) -1,090; 2. Scott 
Kuxhouse (57)-l,076; 3. Larry Surlcta 
(55)-l,062; 4. Ed Devall (6)-1.046; 5. 
Jim Bennett (33)-934; 6. Rob Olson 
(95) -850; 7. Dave H olden (29) -8 18; 8. 
Bobby John Herislcy (15)-762; 9. Bob 
Tellcfsen (15J-716; 10. Jeff Seidler (1)- 
542. 



\m WiKG 




Yonr Favorite High School Teams Hit the Airwaves on 

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of Lake County 

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Be sure to give Paul or Wendy a 
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SPORTS/LEISURE UkriANd Newspapers September 10, 1 994 



I 



Knights go downhill 
early, in league defeat 



Sometimes you know on any 
given day it will not t>c your shining 
moment 

The Lake County Knights suf- 
fered that fate Sunday at Hanson 
Stadium. From a second-play fum- 
ble to a last-second altercation 
between a player and Coach Al 
Dark, it was indeed a rough after- 
noon for the Knights in a 38-0 loss. 
The defeat drops the Knights to 2-2 
in the Uiicagoland Football League. 
The Pailhcrs stay perfect and in first 
place at 4-0. 

The misery began early. 
Trailing 6-0 after Avery Thurmon 
had scored the game's first tally on 
a 1-yard run, a fumbled handoff 
and an interception marked the 
end of the first two possessions. 

"They were a well-rounded 
team, but I still have confidence in 
this team," Clark said. 

Clark was allegedly struck by 
defensive end Randy Jones as the 
final minutes wore down, Clark 
said he had benched his former 
North Chicago High player. 

If there was a bright spot for the 
Knights on this miserable day, it 
was the defensive secondary. 

Although throwing for more 
than 1 1 yards, QB Tom Lesencwicz 
only beat the secondary on two 
scores: a 39-yarder to Kevin Jackson 
for an 18-0 lead and a 29-yardcr to 
Louis Ortiz for the final score. 

"The defensive secondary did 
not get us in trouble," Clark said. 

"We were overaggressivc 
against the screen. I thought we did 
OK. They exploited us at the mid- 
dle. They have good receivers who 



ran their routes well and found the 
seems and ate us up. It Is very frus- 
trating," Knights Dale Jackson said. 

Jackson is joined in the sec- 
ondary by Craig Freeman and . 
Steve Gardner. Gardner had an 
interception in the end zone 
which prevented yet another 
score. Lesencwicz played in the 
shadows of Hanson Stadium at 
Calvin High in Chicago. 

"We scored 65 points last week. 
Everyone executed," he said. Six 
turnovers, including an intercep- 
tion returned for a touchdown, 
spelled doom for the Knights. 

"We had some internal prob- 
lems mis week with guys who don't 
practice," Clark said. The season Is 
far from over, as the Knights return 
to Hanson Stadium Oct 2 to face 
the South Side Hitmen at 1 p.m. 

"You wilt sec a whole different 
game next week," Jackson stated. 

The Knights are in 100 percent 
agreement 




5&& 



ij. "i .'"■ ' ',;.'"■ 






'■'",. ■;:-•'■ 



Defending the pass 

Lake County Knights defenders John Burns (55) and Mike Mullen try to break up a Chicago 
Panthers pass. QBTom Lesenewlcz completed the pass to Avery Thurmon. Thurmon scofed two 
touchdowns In Pathers' 38-0 rout. 



Bauer sparks CLC hooters, net two OT victories 



Eric Bauer may have been in- 
spired as he was playing against 
some of his old high school op- 
ponents. He scored 3 goals. 

Two days later, Bauer con- 
tributed to provide College of 
Lake County with key chances as 
CLC won two double overtime 
matches to go over .500 overall 
with a 6-3 win over McHcnry and 
a 4-2 win at Kishwaukce. 

"He is our only sophomore 
forward and we knew he was ca- 



pable of that. His goals came 
from all over - left side and right 
side. He makes the opportunities 
of the shots he gets," CLC Coach 
Dave Beck said. 

The Lancers fell behind 3-0 at 
halftimc against the up-and- 
coming Scots. "We talked about 
what we needed to do and doing 
it. We were calm and composed. 
We had a lot of chances In the 
first half, but were not finishing 
them off," Beck said. 



Jeff Ilaug scored CLC's first 
second-half goal off an assist by 
Matt Roebuck. Bauer scored the 
next two goals, off Hclmuth 
Fcndcl assists. Bauer then com- 
pleted the hatrick. 



Dave Porterck never left the field. 
Against Kishwaukce in the 
rain, CLC won 4-2 after a 1 -1 reg- 
ulation standoff. Brooks got the 
regulation goal and Mike Perez 
off a pass from Roebuck and 



McHcnry scored a goal for a Brooks from Haug gave CLC the 

4-3 lead, but Jason Brooks and win. 

Bauer teamed to complete the CLC hosts Lewis and Clark at 

scoring. 1 p.m. Oct. 1 in Grayslakc.- 

The 60 minute of overtime "This is our first time, .over 

meant defenders Chris Swanson, .500 and we would like to stay 

Chris Wallin, Julio Farfun and there," Beck said. 



NEWS 1 22 



■ 









THG TALK OF LAKE COUNTY 

"THE ACTION AUCTION" 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1994 AT 9 AM 
Listen and call 336-7900 to bid on the following items: 

YAMAHA FZR lOOO MOTORCYCLE - Ace Honda, Kenosha 

8»xl0' CUSTOM MIRRORED WALL - Waukcgan/Gurnec Class, Gurnee 

COMPLETE LIVING ROOM SET - Sears Homclife, Mundeleln 

SYBARIS POOL SUITES GETAWAYS - Sybaris, Downers Grove 

MAJESTIC FIREPLACE WITH BEVELED GLASS - Collins Fireplace, Waukegan 

CUSTOM WINDOW TREATMENTS - Draperies & Blinds, Etc., Zion 

QUEEN SEALY POSTURPEDIC SET - Classic Mattress, Waukegan 

CERTIFICATE FOR MERCHANDISE - Victor Furs, Highland Park 

PORTABLE CELLULAR PHONE PACKAGE - Pace Communications, Waukegan 

ROYAL STUDIO PROFESSIONAL PIANO - Conn Music Center, Highland Park 

60 SQUARE YARDS CARPET - Frank & Marthas, Waukegan 

BOB TOSKI CUSTOM GOLF CLUBS - La Golfeur, Mundelcin 

MEMBERSHIP PACKAGES - Lake County YMCA. 

Other Items Include: 

Gift certificates - Nevada Bobs, Liberty v ill e 

Singer Spartan sewing machine - Singer Sewing Center, Liberty ville 

Phillips Interactive CD Player - Remco, Waukegan 

2 Pair Rollcrbladcs - Village Skate, Mundelcin 

13# & 16# Bowling Balls - Ericksons Pro Shop, Waukegan 

Bcnclli Super 12 Gauge Shotgun - Custom Gun, McHenry 

2 Night Getaway Packages - Hampton Inn, Gurnee 

Mens Snowmobile Sportswear Suits - Ron & Brian's Suzuki, Waukegan 

Complete Bill Blass Tuxedo - Gingiss Formal Wear, Waukegan 

Certificate for Transmission Repair - Motra Transmission Center, Waukegan 

70 gallon Fish Tank with Accessories - Happyland Pet Center, Waukegan 

Golf Memberships - Zion Park District, Zion 

3'x5' American Flag Installed - Kosco Flags, Waukegan 

Fireproof Safe - Waukegan Safe & Lock, Waukegan 

Jelly Belly Gift Pack - Goclitz Confectionary, North Chicago 

• ••and fabulous food certificates from: 



Madison Avenue Restaurant - Waukegan 
Bernhardt'** Bakery - Gurnee 
Pepe's Mexican Restaurant - Waukegan 
Domino's Pizza - Buffalo Grove 



Hillery's Ribs & Bar-B-Que - North Chicago 
Franklin Foods - Waukegan 
Happy Bill's Restaurant - Zion 
Ethel's Place Farmstand - Palatine 



Tune in to News 1220, WKRS for more valuable merchandise not listed here! 

and remember... 
DON'T BID BLIND! SEE THESE ITEMS FIRST HAND AT THE MERCHANTS LISTED! 










ScpTEMbM 10, 1994 UkElANd Newspapers SPORTS/LEISURE 




Injuries, Benet no match for Carmel's character 



The toughest part of the week 
for Carmel High's football team 
seems to be Monday through 
Thursday. 

The Corsairs overcame thin- 
ning of numbers and posted a key 
13-0 win at Benet Academy 
Saturday. The win improves 
Carmel to 2-3 overall, 1-2 East 
Suburban Catholic Conference 
and breaks a three-game losing 
streak. 

"We arc really banged up and 
have a lot of injuries. We started 
with 52 players on the roster. We 
had 37 players for practice Friday," 
Coach Mike Fitzgibbons said. 

The Corsairs were without 
leading touchdown scorer Ruben 
Rivera and quarterback J. R. 
Ocampo. 

"Ocampo is through for the 
year. He rcinjurcd a knee in prac- 
tice/' Fitzgibbons said. 

The Corsairs went with soph 
Luke Chorazy at QB and a rush- 
oriented attack. Led by 91 yards 
from Nick Yeagcr and 50 from 
Chorazy himself, Carmel racked 
up 336 yards on the ground com- 
pared to 114 for Benet 

"Wc had a bigger line and we 
wanted a shorter game and better 
field position. This team showed a 
lot of character," Fitzgibbons said. 



I'Jii 

' Chorazy was the hero in the 

first week ijs .Carmel downed Notre 

Dame 24-26. lie 1 played to start the 

in the sce&ndlwftglc^ 

Yeagcr and Qiorazyscol^d'tfte 
CHS touchdowns in the second 
quarter at rain-mlrcd Benet 

Yeagcr capped a drive with a 
16-yard run midway through the 
period. 

The defense, led by Pat Kraft 
and Steve Golcbioski, both se- 
niors, made key play after key play. 
. Kraft Intercepted a pass following 
' a Carmel fumble which could have 
given Benet hope. A fourth-down 
pass all but ended the game. 

An interception by Golcbioski 
set up the second score - a 1-yard 
Chorazy run. The drive featured a 
13-yard pickup by Yeagcr on third 
down and Chorazy\s two-yard run 
on fourth down. 



CHS made three fourth-down 
tries., . 

"We arc really proud of the 
offensive line. Plus, I had night- 
mares of them blocking a punt" 
Fitzgibbons said. 

"This is a huge win. It is a big a 
game as i I can remember," 
Fitzgibbons said. 

"Wc have to sore things up. We 
were Inside the 20, but did not 
score. Wc have to do something. 
We have our. best personnel in In 
offense," Benet coach Gary 
Goforth said. "It is a killer. Wc 
played as hard as they did," 

Carmel Is now back in the 
playoff picture at 2-3 and looks to 
keep the effort alive at Marist in 
Chicago at 7:30 p.m. Sept 30. The 
Redskins arc also coming off a 
shutout over a win! ess team, 
downing St Joseph 37-0.. 



CLC spikers prepare for 'classic' 




College of Lake County's vol- 
leyball team had lost twice as 
many matches as it had won, but 
the Lancers arc far from giving up 
hope. 

"We felt good about the way 
we played in the win over DuPage 
and even in the loss to McHenry, " 



CLC Coach Sue Garcia said. 

CLC downed No. 2 DuPage 
15-5, 15-8 and beat McHenry 15- 
12 in the first game before losing 
15-9, 15-6. 

"We controlled the tempo 
against DuPage. We just passed 
well," Garcia said. 



Luke Chorazy fights hit way for yards during the game with Benot. 
Quarterback Chorazy scored a touchdown In Carmel's 13-0 win. 
Carmel Is at Marist Sept. 29 at 7:30 p.m.— Photo by Steve Peterson 

Vikings defense leads the way 




From page C36 

from the stands as a referee eject- 
ed him. 

"That was a bad judgment 

call on his; part because he had • 

his back to me and looking at me 2SH5S5 
"out of the corner of his eye. He 

'^'should have been watching the 
game. There were 20 penalties . 

r»^cd,agafost^g^^^ 

against the opposition. There is a 

f little unbalance there," King 

§; said. 

King said he was adjusting a 
player's helmet on the sidelines. 
The Warhawk coach said his 
players were celebrating when 
Zion players allegedly started the 
altercation. 

"Our students conducted 
themselves, very well. It is always 
a big rivalry game and there was ' 
■ just a little scuffle after the game. 
It is unfortunate the. decision 
came about. Wc arc ready to play 
Zion in any sport," Dr. Cuttic Ba- 
con, North Chicago superinten- 
dent, said. 

The implications of Zion 
dropping North Chicago events 
reaches into the conference 
standings of various sports. 

"I have not looked at the 
league constitution yet but if 
they don't play, it would be a for- 
feit by Zion," Tim Albers, Ubcr- 
tyville High athletic director said. 

Albers said LHS, to his knowl- 
edge, has not had trouble with 
behavior of North Chicago ath- 
letes. "We have had problems at 
• the underlcass level with teams 
. not showing up," he said. 

A volleyball match between 
Warren and North Chicago last 
week was postponed to Oct. 3 due 
to the Warhawks only having five 
players on an injury-riddled team. 

"I believe they canceled the 
games due to a safety concern/' 
Lcn Chimino, Warren Township 
High athletic director, said. 

The decision was a topic for a 
Warren High board member 
Tuesday night 

"I believe Zion did the right 
thing for the students," Jan 
Brennan said. 

On another front, Chimino 
said the three schools who lost to 
North Chicago while Hampton 
was coach will be submitting a 



letter to the Illinois High School John Davis, Mundelein High 
Association. "Everyone needs to School principal and NSC chair- 
know if they violated the by- 'man, said before meeting he did 
laws," he said. not know-of any such action. 



Led by two turnovers for 
touchdowns, the Lake County 
Vikings shutout the Chicago 
Falcons 15-0 Saturday. 

The Vikes will be looking to 
stay competitive with Racine 
longer than they did earlier with 
an Oct 1 game at Round Lake 
High. The Vikes bring a 4-2 
record into the second chance 
with Racine in the 6 p.m. game. 



Racine won two weeks ago, 45-0. 

Gary Griffin continued to 
play havoc with those who wish 
to throw the ball, returning one 
Interception for a 51-yard score 
and gaining three other pick 
offs. 

Butch Turney made the Fal- 
cons pay for their* first mistake 
with a 36-yard fumble return in 
the second quarter. 



Official publication 



• • • Notice of Proposed Constitutional Amendments * * • 

Pursuant to law public notice Is hereby given that the following proposed amendments to the Illinois Constitution will be 

submitted. to the Electors of the State of lUiiwii f oc adoptioo or rejection at the General. Election to.be held on November 8, 1994, 
(Proposed changes in the existing constitutional provisions are indicated by underscoring new matter and by striking ail matter to be deleted.) 



PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO 

ARTICLE I. BILL OF RIGHTS 

SECTION 8. RIGHTS AFTER INDICTMENT 

In criminal prosecutions, the accused shall have the right to appear 
and defend in person and by counsel; to demand the nature and 
cause of the accusation and have a copy thereof; to be confronted 



with the witnewM ayamct him nr her in m — l j fc t WJBWM- fa — m 



fee* and to have process to compel the attendance of witnesses in his 
or her behalf; and to have a speedy public trial by an impartial jury 
of the county in which the offense is alleged to have been 
committed. 

, SCHEDULE 

This Constitutional Amendment takes effect upon approval by the 
electors of this State. 



FORM OF BALLOT 

This proposed amendment to Article I will appear upon the ballot in 
the following form: 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO 

SECTION 8 OF ARTICLE I 

(Bill of Rights) 

Explanation of Proposed Amendment 

This proposed amendment changes Article I, Section 8 of the Illinois 
Constitution regarding the rights of the accused in a criminal 
prosecution by replacing language giving the accused the right "to 
meet the' witnesses face to face" with language giving the accused 
the right "to be confronted with the witnesses against him or her". 



For the proposed amendment to 
Section 8 of Article 1 - Bill 
of Rights - of the Constitution 



YES 



NO 



PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO 

ARTICLE IV. THE LEGISLATURE 

SECTION 10. EFFECTIVE DATE OF LAWS 

The General Assembly shall provide by law for a uniform effective 
date for laws passed prior to June July 1 of a calendar year. The 
Genera) Assembly may provide for a different effective date in any 
taw passed prior to iujac JWy-4. A bill passed after Ma y ftl , fem-3Q 



shall not become effective prior to June My 1 of the next calendar 
year unless the General Assembly by the vote of three-fifths of the 
members elected to each house provides for an earlier effective date. 

SCHEDULE 
This Constitutional Amendment takes effect upon its approval by the 
electors of this State. 



FORM OF BALLOT 

This proposed amendment to Article IV will appear upon the ballot in 
the following form: 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO v 

SECTION 10 OF ARTICLE IV 
(The Legislature) 
Explanation of Proposed amendment 
This proposed amendment, which takes effect upon approval by the 
voters, amends the Effective Date of Laws section of the 1970 Illinois 
Constitution. This section of the Constitution details when bills shall 
take effect and by what vote they must pass the General Assembly if 
they are to take effect earlier than scheduled. 
Currently, any bill passed after June 30 cannot take effect before July 
1 of the following year unless the bill passes the legislature by a three 
fifths voce. The proposed amendment changes the date when the three- 
fifths vote requirement takes effect from July 1 to June 1,. As a result 
of this amendment, any bill passed after May 31 will not take effect 
until June 1 of the following year unless the bill passes the legislature 
by a three- fifths vote. 



C'i 



For the proposed amendment to 
Section 10 of Article TV - The 
Legislature - of the Constitution 



YES 



NO 



Office of the Secretary of State • Capitol building • Springfield, Illinois 

I, GEORGE H. RYAN, Secretary of State of the State of Illinois, do hereby certify that the foregoing Is a true copy of the proposals 
and the forms in which the proposals will appear upon the ballot at the November 8, 1994 General Election pursuant to Senate 
Joint Resolution Constitutional Amendment 123 and House Joint Resolution Constitutional Amendment 35, of the Eighty-Eighth 
General Assembly, the originals of which are on file in this office. 



In witness whereof, I hereunto set my hand and affix 
the Great Seal of the State or Illinois. Done In the City 
of Springfield, this U* day of August 1994. 





George H. Ryan 
Secretary of State 



0994E-197-Gen 

September 30, 1904 

October 7, 1994 

October 14, 1994 




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